Mexico Tree of life (3)

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The Mexican Trees of Life traditionally represent the myth of Adam and Eve’s banishment from Earth but interpreted through indigenous religious beliefs. They also represent Earth’s fertility, which involves dying to be reborn. The tree form is now used to depict many different stories including trees of death.

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  • Traditional Tree of Life with Garden of Eden theme from Metepec The craft is made in three principal areas: Metepec, Mexico State, Izucar de Matamoros, and Acatlan , both in Puebla, and most are made with commercial intent. In the old days, these were a traditional gift for newlyweds as a symbol of fertility and abundance. The craft is best preserved in Metepec, where craftsmen have received orders from countries such as China, Japan, France, Italy and Germany with a large number going to Spain. The government of the municipality of Metepec has sponsored courses in pottery and ceramics to keep the tradition alive. However, the craft has been waning and may be in danger of extinction. On Comonfort Street in Metepec there are dozens of pottery workshops but only two of these remain making the trees. One major reason for this is cheap imitations, mostly imported from Asia. This has been a problem for many Mexican crafts, with the federal government stepping in to develop trademarks and “denomination of origin” for traditional crafts.
  • This group consists of only one, giant cactus native to the southwestern U.S. and northwest Mexico. C. gigantea (Candelabra Cactus; Giant Cactus; and Saguaro or Sahuaro) is one of the largest of the Cactus family. In the wild, the Saguaro Cactus usually forms large colonies. It is a home to many birds and is popularly used as scenery in movies. This cactus takes up to 150 years to grow into a plant 40 feet tall, eventually reaching a height of 50 feet or more with a trunk up to 2 feet thick. A cactus this size weighs several tons. Because it is so slow-growing, it is an excellent container plant when small. This columnar cactus sometimes grows a few branches when it is 10 to 15 years old, making it resemble a candelabrum. Young plants are unbranched and much more heavily spined. When the plant is 40 years old or more, huge, funnel-shaped, fragrant flowers are produced. These greenish-white or white blossoms are produced in the spring on the tips of the stems. They are followed by red, oval, edible fruits. Plants in the wild produce millions of seeds, though usually only one seedling in 50 million is successful; therefore, a mature cactus may reproduce only once every five years. Taking plants from the wild is illegal.
  • Navajo tree of life rug
  • Mexico Tree of life (3)

    1. 1. México Tree of life http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1298765-tree-of-life3/
    2. 2. The tree of life (candelabra) is a popular form of art in Mexico. Shaped in the form of a tree, it is then crafted in great detail with figures such as people, branches, flowers, fruit, animals and other subject matter
    3. 3. Mural done with Mayolica tiles entitled Arbol geneologico del comienzo del mestizaje Museum of Artes Populares in Mexico City
    4. 4. Cactus gigantea (Candelabra Cactus; Giant Cactus) Traditional Tree of Life (Candelabra) created by Oscar Sotano on display at the Museum de Artes Populares in Mexico City
    5. 5. Cactus gigantea (Candelabra Cactus; Giant Cactus
    6. 7. The Mexican Trees of Life traditionally represent the myth of Adam and Eves banishment from Earth but interpreted through indigenous religious beliefs . They also represent Earth’s fertility , which involves dying to be reborn. The tree form is now used to depict many different stories including trees of death . Traditional Tree of Life (Candelabra) on display at the Museum de Artes Populares in Mexico City
    7. 17. The Church of Santo Domingo in Oaxaca opened for worship in 1608 and is one of the best examples of baroque architecture in Mexico. The genealogical tree of Santo Domingo de Guzmán (founder of the Order) is outstanding. It is done in gilded and polychrome plasterwork upon the ceiling of the sotacoro (the area under a raised choir)
    8. 20. Tree of Life, traditional Navajo design comes to us from the Mexican state of Zacatecas
    9. 21. Talavera poblana
    10. 22. Talavera poblana
    11. 23. Viva México huichol yarn painting
    12. 24. S ound: Lila Downs - Semilla de piedra; Cumbia Maya México Text & Pictures: Internet 6 personal photos Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Arangement : Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

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