8 Tasmania
West Coast wilderness railway
The West Coast Wilderness Railway forms a gateway for visitors to explore Tasmania’s unique rail heritage, discovering the...
 
 
Eucalyptus nitens (improved genetic strains) have been planted throughout hundreds of thousands of hectares of Tasmania
 
There are more than 700 species of Eucalyptus, mostly native to Australia. The Tasmanian Blue Gum was proclaimed as the fl...
 
The West Coast Wilderness Railway, Tasmania is a reconstruction of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company railway betw...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dicksonia antarctica, Tasmanian Tree Fern
 
 
For many Australians, they recognize that Tasmania is a last bastion, or stronghold for quite a number of unique fauna, pa...
 
 
 
 
 
Tasmania Text: Internet  Pictures :  ♦  Sanda Foişoreanu ♦  Doina  Grigora ş Arangement :  Sanda Foişoreanu Anne Kirkpatri...
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Tasmania8 West Coast Wilderness Railway

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1174901-tasmania8/

When the ABT Railway (now the West Coast Wilderness Railway) was built in Tasmania, it was considered one of the engineering marvels of Australia.

The West Coast pioneers who built the original railway in 1896 accomplished a great feat of labour. For many miles along the King River the railway line was hewn with pick and shovel out of the steep side of the gorge. Forty two bridges were built over the 22-mile long stretch of wilderness; for the 'quarter mile' bridge below the gorge, pylons had to be driven 60 feet into the silt with men constantly up to their waists in the cold water.
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  • YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
    http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1174901-tasmania8/
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  • Thank you Johndemi!
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  • I missed this one,I think what happened is you might have posted it after 9 hence I assumed I
    already watched it.
    Thanks for the reminder ,I like it including both songs.
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  • When the ABT Railway (now the West Coast Wilderness Railway) was built in Tasmania, it was considered one of the engineering marvels of Australia. The West Coast pioneers who built the original railway in 1896 accomplished a great feat of labour. For many miles along the King River the railway line was hewn with pick and shovel out of the steep side of the gorge. Forty two bridges were built over the 22-mile long stretch of wilderness; for the 'quarter mile' bridge below the gorge, pylons had to be driven 60 feet into the silt with men constantly up to their waists in the cold water.
  • Along the 35km journey you will stop at stations of the past - Lower Landing, Dubbil Barril, Rinadeena - where your trained guides will bring to life the stories of these historic points on the railway.
  • West Coast Wilderness Railway brings you the most spectacular views as you pass over bridges towering above the rivers below, through massive hand-hewed rock cuttings, under the protective canopies of ancient rainforests and along the edge of plunging gorges. The historic 35 kilometre railway of tight curves and spectacular bridges clambers through rugged wilderness, dense Tasmanian rainforest and steep gorges, a legacy of the engineering skills, determination and endurance of the early 19th century West Coast pioneers who built it. Their spirit is reflected in the original railway motto "We find a way or make it".
  • the heritage coaches on the railway have been painstakingly recreated to ensure you'll enjoy a comfortable journey. For real indulgence, choose the Premier Carriage - where you're every desire, from sparkling at breakfast to pastries for morning tea and local cheeses in the afternoon, is catered for by your personal carriage guide. Or take in the journey through the Tasmanian wilderness from the comfortable Tourist Carriage lined in Tasmanian specialty timber, with lunch included.
  • A lunch stop in the heart of the dense forest at Dubbil Barril allows passengers to wander along forest paths and discover remote creeks running down to the King River and see first hand the beauty of the majestic Tasmanian wilderness rainforest. At Lower Landing, passengers can enjoy the treat of tasting Tasmania's unique leatherwood honey, from the hives of the Tasmanian Honey Company that are dotted throughout the rainforest. Trains run daily leaving Strahan or Queenstown. Coach shuttles are available for the return journey. 'Fettlers' lunches and afternoon teas are available on board the train, or why not try 'Dotties' coffee shop in Queenstown for a fine selection of light refreshments, before or after your journey.
  • The history of the West Coast Wilderness Railway is marked by resourcefulness and frontier spirit that continues to influence the special character of the west coast today, according to Federal Group Managing Director, Greg Farrell. The opening of the railway's full service between Queenstown and Strahan on 27 December 2002 is a landmark for the region, says Mr Farrell. "The railway has a story that inspires us today and tells us an enormous amount about the flavour of the west coast - its hardiness, the tenacity of the people, and the way they adapted to remote and harsh conditions with ingenuity," he says. He is convinced that the west coast has the potential to be one of the most fascinating and compelling tourism regions in Australia. The railway, along with Macquarie Harbour and Strahan as the gateway to the World Heritage Area, will help build strong, memorable visitor experiences of the region. "When they leave the area, we want visitors to take away its imprint - the feel, the sights and sounds that create the distinctive edge for the west coast," Mr Farrell says. The Federal Group acquired the railway last July as part of an "all points of the compass" expansion program that included purchase of the popular Strahan Village accommodation centre and Gordon River Cruises, as well as a prime beachfront site to be developed as a world-class resort at Coles Bay on the east coast. The new holdings were added to the existing line-up of Wrest Point in Hobart and the Country Club Resort in Launceston.
  • Tasmania8 West Coast Wilderness Railway

    1. 1. 8 Tasmania
    2. 2. West Coast wilderness railway
    3. 3. The West Coast Wilderness Railway forms a gateway for visitors to explore Tasmania’s unique rail heritage, discovering the inspiring story of the pioneers who built the railway more than 100 years ago.
    4. 6. Eucalyptus nitens (improved genetic strains) have been planted throughout hundreds of thousands of hectares of Tasmania
    5. 8. There are more than 700 species of Eucalyptus, mostly native to Australia. The Tasmanian Blue Gum was proclaimed as the floral emblem of Tasmania on 27 November 1962. Blue gum is one of the most extensively planted eucalypts. Its rapid growth and adaptability to a range of conditions is responsible for its popularity.
    6. 10. The West Coast Wilderness Railway, Tasmania is a reconstruction of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company railway between Queenstown and Regatta Point.
    7. 26. Dicksonia antarctica, Tasmanian Tree Fern
    8. 29. For many Australians, they recognize that Tasmania is a last bastion, or stronghold for quite a number of unique fauna, particularly the carnivorous marsupials like the Tasmanian devil and the quolls. They have got a number of species that have remained here, whereas on the mainland they’ve become extinct.
    9. 35. Tasmania Text: Internet Pictures : ♦ Sanda Foişoreanu ♦ Doina Grigora ş Arangement : Sanda Foişoreanu Anne Kirkpatrick - Train Track Of Emotions Gang Gajang - Talk To Me

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