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Glasgow University
Glasgow University
Glasgow University
Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery
Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland with a University and Cathedral dating back to the 15th century
Glasgow University, Scotland, Lanarkshire from the early 1900's.
 
 
A grand obelisk located in the centre of Glasgow Green, the Nelson Monument lies on the north bank of the River Clyde a ha...
Glasgow Green is a park situated in the east end of Glasgow on the north bank of the River Clyde. It is the oldest park in...
Glasgow Green Templeton Business Centre
Saint Andrews church near Glasgow Cross
 
 
 
 
F otograf ii : Ioana Minciu Prezentare: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Raindrops keep fallin’ on my hea...
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Glasgow

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Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and third most populous in the United Kingdom. The city is situated on the River Clyde in the country's west central lowlands. Glasgow grew from the medieval Bishopric of Glasgow and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow in the 15th century, which subsequently became a major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment in the 18th century. From the 18th century the city also grew as one of Britain's main hubs of transatlantic trade with British North America and the British West Indies.
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  • Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and third most populous in the United Kingdom. The city is situated on the River Clyde in the country's west central lowlands. A person from Glasgow is known as a Glaswegian. Glasgow grew from the medieval Bishopric of Glasgow and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow in the 15th century, which subsequently became a major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment in the 18th century. From the 18th century the city also grew as one of Britain's main hubs of transatlantic trade with British North America and the British West Indies.
  • With the Industrial Revolution, the city and surrounding region shifted to become one of the world's pre-eminent centers of Heavy Engineering. most notably in the Shipbuilding and Marine engineering industry, which produced many innovative and famous vessels. Glasgow was known as the "Second City of the British Empire" for much of the Victorian era and Edwardian period. Today it is one of Europe's top twenty financial centers and is home to many of Scotland's leading businesses. Glasgow is also ranked as the 57th most livable city in the world.
  • The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, the university was founded in 1451 and is presently one of seventeen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the world. In the 19th century, it became a leader in British higher education by providing the educational needs of youth from the urban and commercial classes, as opposed to the upper class. Glasgow served these students by preparing them for professions that were not commercial - the law, medicine, teaching, and the church. It also trained a smaller group for careers in science and engineering. It was the Sunday Times "Scottish University of the Year" for 2007. The university is a member of the Russell Group and of Universitas 21.
  • Since 1870, the main University campus has been located on Gilmorehill in the West End of the city. Additionally, there are a number of university buildings elsewhere in the city, a facility at Loch Lomond, the University Marine Biological Station Millport and the Crichton Campus in Dumfries (which is jointly operated alongside a number of other institutions). Glasgow has departments of Law, Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, and Dentistry—a position that is unique amongst the other universities in Scotland.
  • Time should be set aside to visit the Glasgow Museum and Art Gallery. Opened in 1901 it probably has the finest municipal collection of British and continental paintings in the United Kingdom. Van Gogh's "Portrait of Alexander Reid" (1886) is certainly one of the museum's highlights as Reid was a well-known Glasgow art collector. Other artists displayed here include Bellini ("Madonna with Child", ca. 1475), Botticelli ("The Annunciation", 1490), Guardi ("San Giorgio Maggiore by the Canale Grande in Venice", 1755), Rembrandt ("The Carcase of an Ox", 1630, "A Man in Armour", 1655), Picasso ("Flower Seller", 1901), Camille Corot ("Mademoiselle de Foudras", 1872), Matisse ("Study of a Young Woman", 1919), Juan Gris ("The Glass", 1918) and Georges Braque ("Still Life with Fruit", 1926). French Impressionists are also well represented with Degas ("Dancers", 1898), Signac (Sunset in Herblay, 1884), Seurat ("Riverbank", 1883), Cézanne ("Fruit Basket", 1877), Monet ("Vetheuil", 1880), Sisley ("Boatyard in Saint-Mammes", 1886) and Pissarro ("The Tuilerie Gardens", 1900). William Aikman and Henry Raeburn ("Mr and Mrs Campbell of Kailzie") represent British portrait artists but others include William Turner ("Stirling", 1831), the Anglo-American Whistler ("Portrait of Thomas Carlyle", 1872), Graham Sutherland, Ben Nicholson and Ben Johnson ("The Gatekeeper", 1977).
  • Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland with a University and Cathedral dating back to the 15th century and home to some of the finest examples of Victorian Architecture in the UK.  In Gaelic, the Celtic language of Scotland, Glasgow (Glasghu) means “Dear Green Place” and, in addition to its 70 parks and gardens, it has some of the most picturesque lochs and mountains, which can be reached within an hour’s drive.  The recently refurbished Kelvingrove Art Gallery is home to some outstanding works of art from Salvador Dali to Charles Rennie MacIntosh. 
  • Next only to the standing stone at Taynuilt, this was the first memorial to Viscount Horatio Nelson (1758 - 1805) anywhere in Britain and the first civic memorial. It commemorates the man and his naval victories, which are recorded on panels around the base; namely Aboukir (1798), Copenhagen (1801) and Trafalgar (1805), where he was killed. Erected by public subscription in 1806, this A-listed monument is 44m (144 feet) in height and the work of architect David Hamilton (1768 - 1843). In 1810, the obelisk was struck by lightning, reducing its height by 6m (20 feet). The damage is still visible and the monument was later protected by the fitting of a lightning conductor. Radical socialist John Maclean (1879 - 1923) held his first anti-war rally here in 1914. In 2002, the Nelson Monument was subject to a £900,000 refurbishment, which include the installation of flood-lighting. Glasgow architect David Hamilton, born in 1768, designed many of Glasgow's most impressive buildings. His best known work was created in the neo-classical style. Among his first projects in Glasgow was Hutcheson's Hospital on Ingram Street, built in 1802. He designed the Nelson Obelisk
  • The Doulton Fountain, gifted to Glasgow as part of the 1888 International Exhibition , was moved to the Green in 1890. Designed by architect Arthur E. Pearce , the 48ft tall fountain was built by the Royal Doulton company to commemorate Queen Victoria's reign. It featured a 70ft wide basin, with a slightly larger than life-size statue of Queen Victoria, surrounded by four life-size statues of water-carriers representing Australasia, Canada, India and South Africa. A lightning strike in 1891 destroyed the statue of Victoria, and rather than let the city replace the statue with an urn, Doulton paid for a second hand-made statue to be produced. In the 1960s the fountain was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair with the water supply being turned off, however in 2002 a £2 million restoration program was started that restored the fountain to its original condition. As of 2004, the fountain has been placed in a new location, in front of the People's Palace.
  • When the Templeton Carpet Company decided to build a factory towards the end of the 19th century, overlooking Glasgow Green, the oldest park in Glasgow, it should have been a straightforward job. But the city council kept rejecting their proposals because they were not good enough. So William Leiper was given the brief to design a building with impeccable credentials. He came up with the idea of making it look like the Doge's Palace in Venice - it is not clear whether he was being serious but the council approved. So in 1892 his extravagant edifice of polychromatic brick - orange, yellow, blue, with turrets and arches and circular windows became a reality. Over the years, additions have been made - some, such the one made in the 1930s, as colourful as the original. It is no longer a carpet factory but has become a business centre instead.
  • George Square is regarded as the very centre of the city as this is the location of the City Chambers, the headquarters of the city council, Glasgow's main public building. The tall column in the centre of the square supports a statue of Sir Walter Scott, one of Scotland's greatest authors. Around the square are other statues of people, including Robert Burns, who have connections with the city. During the Christmas period the square is ablaze with its decorations while, during the hottest part of the summer, office workers flock to the benches in a desperate bid to soak up some sunlight.
  • The square was laid out in 1781, even though a few years later it was still being described as a hollow, filled with green-water, and a favorite resort for drowning puppies, while the banks of this suburban pool were the slaughtering place of horses. Large two and three storey houses were built around it between 1787 and the 1820s, but only the present-day hotel on the square's northern side retains these early buildings. The square itself was given over to private gardens which only the privileged householders could use; this so annoyed other Glaswegians that its railings were torn down on several occasions. Later the council discovered (as an 1872 guide relates) that the whole enclosure belonged to the public who had been so long excluded from it. The square was to achieve its pre-eminence when the city moved its centre westwards and the merchants and manufacturers who controlled the council wanted a lavishly decorated building and a grand civic space which reflected their position as leaders of the City.
  • Glasgow

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    2. 2. ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵ ۵
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    4. 4. Glasgow University
    5. 5. Glasgow University
    6. 6. Glasgow University
    7. 7. Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery
    8. 8. Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland with a University and Cathedral dating back to the 15th century
    9. 9. Glasgow University, Scotland, Lanarkshire from the early 1900's.
    10. 12. A grand obelisk located in the centre of Glasgow Green, the Nelson Monument lies on the north bank of the River Clyde a half-mile (1 km) southeast of the city centre.
    11. 13. Glasgow Green is a park situated in the east end of Glasgow on the north bank of the River Clyde. It is the oldest park in the city dating back to the 15th century.
    12. 14. Glasgow Green Templeton Business Centre
    13. 15. Saint Andrews church near Glasgow Cross
    14. 20. F otograf ii : Ioana Minciu Prezentare: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Raindrops keep fallin’ on my head – Sacha Distel

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