Like all folk dancing,
traditional Mexican dances
provide a glimpse into the
culture of the region. Not
only do these danc...
Mexican culture shines
through the traditional
dances of the country.
Many Mexican families
are planted firmly in
religiou...
Many school children learn the Jarabe
Tapatío (Mexican Hat Dance) in their
classrooms, while tourists to Mexico may
witnes...
The Jarabe Tapatío
The Mexican Hat Dance was
named the national dance of
Mexico in 1924 in an effort to bring
together sev...
The dance involves a male and a female dancer, with
the male working hard to seduce the female during the
dance. At first ...
A joyous dance, the
number finishes with the
woman accepting the male
dancer's courtship, and the
two delight the audience...
Many variations show different levels of sexuality;
traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited very
suggestive beha...
The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19th
century. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously pe...
Jarabe Tapatío, or the Mexican hat dance, is the best
known of a variety of Mexican folk dance called the
jarabe. Original...
Charro and China Poblana garments
China poblana (or, Chinese
Pueblan) is a term that refers to
two elements of the culture of
Mexico that have been related
...
Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
The china poblana of popular
imagination — of shiny
embroidered blouse and shawl
— is ...
The China Poblana gown, wore by women that worked in the cities as maids or vendors
created this new clothing style that c...
Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
The legend of this emblematic woman was born between
the XVI and XVII in Puebla, in New Spain. Mirrha was a
child from Mon...
Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
Miguel de Sosa taught Mirrha to read, to pray and to behave like an European
lady. She became a Catholic, changed her name...
Festival costume skirt
British Museum
When Miguel de Sosa died, he
provided Catarina’s manumission in
his will, and she de...
As a member of the Poor Clares of Saint Augustine Catarina studied
philosophy, theology and law; she made her main priorit...
Today she’s remembered not only for her dress, that became part of the
identity of Puebla, but also because of her life de...
Her legend was born with that dress, the colorful, bright and highly
ornamented dress that has been a symbol of Mexico all...
Mexican hat dance, or Jarabe Tapatío (Feria de las Culturas Amigas de la Ciudad de México)
The Charro gown; once the
Spanish left the new upper
classes enjoyed horse riding and
developed a suitable gown called
tra...
Charro is a term referring to a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in ...
The "charro film" was a genre of
the Golden Age of Mexican
cinema between 1935 and 1959,
and probably played a large role
...
Stained glass window entitled "El Jarabe Tapatio" (The Jarabe Dance from Guadalajara) designed by Roberto Montenegro and
X...
“Bailarines de Vallarta” (“Vallarta Dancers”) by Jim
Demetro, 2006
Inspired after seeing Vallarta’s famous Xiutla dance tr...
As the oldest and most celebrated dance company in Mexico, Ballet
Folklórico de México de Amalia Hernández shares the beau...
Text and pictures: Internet
Copyright: All the images belong to their authors
Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu
https://plus....
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
Mexico El jarabe tapatio
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The Mexican Hat Dance was named the national dance of Mexico in 1924 in an effort to bring together several different cultures together as one national identity. Since it became the national dance it has also become a symbol of Mexico around the world.
The dance involves a male and a female dancer, with the male working hard to seduce the female during the dance. At first the two dancers flirt, but then the woman's attention is turned away from the man's advances. A joyous dance, the number finishes with the woman accepting the male dancer's courtship, and the two delight the audience with a kiss hidden by the male dancer's hat. Many variations show different levels of sexuality; traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited very suggestive behavior in a public performance, but culture has changed and with it this dance has become increasingly suggestive.
The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19th century. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously perform the Jarabe Tapatío at various fiestas and other big events.
Famous ballerina Anna Pavlova went on to perform a version of this dance en pointe, and it brought her newfound celebrity in Mexico.

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  • Mexico El Jarabe Tapatio
    http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1638768-el-jarabe-tapatio/
    http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/el-jarabe-tapatio
  • Mexico El jarabe tapatio

    1. 1. Like all folk dancing, traditional Mexican dances provide a glimpse into the culture of the region. Not only do these dances from Mexico express the rhythms of the music, but also the vital colors woven into Mexican clothing and decoration, as well as themes important to the region such as Catholicism and communion with nature.
    2. 2. Mexican culture shines through the traditional dances of the country. Many Mexican families are planted firmly in religious faith and the rich intricacies of generational traditions and celebrations observed year after year. Dance has long played a role in these special days, such as coming-of-age parties, religious events, and agricultural celebrations.
    3. 3. Many school children learn the Jarabe Tapatío (Mexican Hat Dance) in their classrooms, while tourists to Mexico may witness a performance of Danza del Venado (Dance of the Deer) or Tlacolorerosis (an agricultural dance). While these traditional dances each have very different roots and styles, they bring various aspects of Mexican culture to the audiences who see them
    4. 4. The Jarabe Tapatío The Mexican Hat Dance was named the national dance of Mexico in 1924 in an effort to bring together several different cultures together as one national identity. Since it became the national dance it has also become a symbol of Mexico around the world, especially in the United
    5. 5. The dance involves a male and a female dancer, with the male working hard to seduce the female during the dance. At first the two dancers flirt, but then the woman's attention is turned away from the man's advances.
    6. 6. A joyous dance, the number finishes with the woman accepting the male dancer's courtship, and the two delight the audience with a kiss hidden by the male dancer's hat.
    7. 7. Many variations show different levels of sexuality; traditional Mexican culture would have prohibited very suggestive behavior in a public performance, but culture has changed and with it this dance has become increasingly suggestive.
    8. 8. The accompanying music is Mexican folk that was created in the 19th century. Today, Mexicans still proudly and joyously perform the Jarabe Tapatío at various fiestas and other big events.
    9. 9. Jarabe Tapatío, or the Mexican hat dance, is the best known of a variety of Mexican folk dance called the jarabe. Originally banned by colonial authorities in the 19th century due to its sexual nature and general challenge to Spanish rule, it has since become symbolic of Mexico both in the country and abroad. As such the dress worn by participants is also meant to symbolize Mexican women and men, with women dressed in a style called “China Poblana” and men dressed as charros.
    10. 10. Charro and China Poblana garments
    11. 11. China poblana (or, Chinese Pueblan) is a term that refers to two elements of the culture of Mexico that have been related by name since the end of the 19th century, although the elements they incorporate are much older. In its most commonly and widely used sense today, it is the name of what is considered the traditional style of dress of women in the Mexican Republic, although in reality it only belonged to some urban zones in the middle and southeast of the country, before its disappearance in the second half of the 19th century.
    12. 12. Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla The china poblana of popular imagination — of shiny embroidered blouse and shawl — is a product of the nineteenth century. Symbol of Mexican femininity, she is linked to Spanish prototypes such as the maja, immortalized in paintings by Murillo y Goya
    13. 13. The China Poblana gown, wore by women that worked in the cities as maids or vendors created this new clothing style that combines Indian, Spanish and oriental elements.
    14. 14. Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
    15. 15. The legend of this emblematic woman was born between the XVI and XVII in Puebla, in New Spain. Mirrha was a child from Mongolia, formerly in China, who was she was sold to a merchant who then took her to New Spain to be the Viceroy’s personal servant. But as soon as they arrived to Acapulco, a wealthy man from Puebla, called Miguel de Sosa, offered a big amount of money for her, almost ten times more than the Viceroy, so the merchant sold her to him instead.
    16. 16. Fountain of China Poblana in Puebla
    17. 17. Miguel de Sosa taught Mirrha to read, to pray and to behave like an European lady. She became a Catholic, changed her name to Catarina de San Juan and created a mix of her typical dressing and the skirts she saw on the indigenous women. This dress became famous and soon everybody in Puebla have heard about the young woman who came from China and wore the most beautiful dresses, she came to be known as La China Poblana (Poblano/a is the name of the people from Puebla, Chino/a of the people from China).
    18. 18. Festival costume skirt British Museum When Miguel de Sosa died, he provided Catarina’s manumission in his will, and she decided to enter a convent.
    19. 19. As a member of the Poor Clares of Saint Augustine Catarina studied philosophy, theology and law; she made her main priority con coexist and convert indigenous people by teaching them catechism, a work she realized until she died in 1688.
    20. 20. Today she’s remembered not only for her dress, that became part of the identity of Puebla, but also because of her life devoted to helping, educating and teaching others. She is also a symbol of unity, of Puebla’s community. It’s amazing that 322 years after she died, this woman is still recognized and remembered for all the good work and love she gave to this city. Her tomb is in La Compañía de Jesus Temple, and is still one of the most visited in Puebla.
    21. 21. Her legend was born with that dress, the colorful, bright and highly ornamented dress that has been a symbol of Mexico all over the world. But her story was real and is still an inspirational one. And walking around Puebla you’ll find many reminders of this woman, the China Poblana Fountain is a classic landmark of the city. The Casona de la China Poblana is a hotel in what used to be her house before she entered the convent. The Museo Regional de Antropologia e Historia has some examples of the China Poblana dress, as well as its story. So, as you can see, this woman’s story is unequivocally liked to Puebla’s story, so come and get immerse in this amazing tale of love, faith and destiny.
    22. 22. Mexican hat dance, or Jarabe Tapatío (Feria de las Culturas Amigas de la Ciudad de México)
    23. 23. The Charro gown; once the Spanish left the new upper classes enjoyed horse riding and developed a suitable gown called traje de charro. A charro soon became a man that was a skilled horse rider.
    24. 24. Charro is a term referring to a traditional horseman from Mexico, originating in the central-western regions primarily in the state of Jalisco including:Michoacán, Zacatecas, Durango, Guanajuato, Morelos and Puebla. The terms Vaquero and Ranchero (Cowboy and Rancher) are similar to the Charro but different in culture, etiquette, mannerism, clothing, tradition and social status. The traditional Mexican charro is known for colorful clothing and participating in coleadero y charreada, a specific type of Mexican rodeo. The charreada is the national sport in Mexico, and is regulated by the Federación Mexicana de Charrería.
    25. 25. The "charro film" was a genre of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema between 1935 and 1959, and probably played a large role in popularizing the charro, akin to what occurred with the advent of the Hollywood Western. The most notable charro stars were José Alfredo Jiménez, Pedro Infante, Jorge Negrete, Antonio Aguilar, Vicente Fernández. In both Mexican and US states such as California, Texas, Illinois, Zacatecas, Michoacán, Jalisco, charros participate in tournaments to show off their skill either in team competition charreada, or in individual competition such as el coleadero. These events are practiced in a Lienzo charro. The lienzo charro can also become a circle used for bull riding.
    26. 26. Stained glass window entitled "El Jarabe Tapatio" (The Jarabe Dance from Guadalajara) designed by Roberto Montenegro and Xavier Guerrero in the 1920's at the Museo de la Luz in the historic center of Mexico City
    27. 27. “Bailarines de Vallarta” (“Vallarta Dancers”) by Jim Demetro, 2006 Inspired after seeing Vallarta’s famous Xiutla dance troupe performing the Jarabe Tapatío (Mexican Hat Dance), Jim Demetro decided to honor this national dance of Mexico with a sculpture. The life-sized figures are unique among Vallarta’s sculptures for their colored patinas. Under “Vallarta Dancers,” there is a plaque with the following message from Demetro: “The inspiration for the sculpture is the youthful energy, flowing movement, and colorful costumes of the talented Xiutla dancers and their instructor and choreographer Prof. Enrique Barrios Limón.”
    28. 28. As the oldest and most celebrated dance company in Mexico, Ballet Folklórico de México de Amalia Hernández shares the beauty of the universe in motion through Mexican dances from the pre-Colombian era, the Hispanic Viceroy period and the popular period of the Revolutionary years. In 1952, dancer and choreographer Amalia Hernández founded the Ballet Folklórico de México, having embarked at a very early age on a never-ending quest to rescue the dancing traditions of Mexico.
    29. 29. Text and pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela Sound: El Jarabe Tapatio - Mariachi Nuevo Jalisco; Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan 2013

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