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Dreamtime

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Australian Aborigines have been employing the careful arrangement of soils and sands of different textures and colours to create pictures whose patterns and symbolism relate to the stories and myths of the Australian Aboriginal's ancestral tribal and cultural history - their Dreamtime. The Dreamtime is the sacred world of the tribe's ancestral spirits whom the Aboriginals regard as the creators of all living things.

Today there are many indigenous Aboriginal artists who work with convential western materials such as acrylics, canvas or board to create beautiful visual effects, at the cutting edge of modern art, but who have synthesized old traditional imagery to conventional techniques.

Australian Aborigines have survived for so many thousands of years, often in quite challenging and inhospitable conditions, and their huge success was predominantly due to the indigenous Aboriginal's innate ability to adapt, and it is the expression of that adaptability which we can clearly see in today’s fabulous Australian Aboriginal art.

Published in: Travel
  • YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
    http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1159430-dreamtime3/
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  • yes Maria is a very powerful art: everything is full of meanings but we don't understand the sense of life and of DREAMTIME! Is a good sign when we can appreciate the harmony of shapes and colors!
    Muchas gracias!
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  • Sanda, I am a little bit busy , but watching your work each time I log in SS
    Aboriginal art is really so, so fascinating and The aboriginal Memorial is touching

    Thank for your work and sending me by mail
    Greetings

    Maria
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  • Un arte muy original, imaginativo, diferente. Me gustó. Muchas gracias.
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  • Beautiful art ,great presentation ,thanks for sharing .
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Dreamtime

  1. 1. Dreamtime Australian Aboriginal Art
  2. 2. The expression “dreamtime” is often used to refer to the “time before time” , or “the time of the creation of all things”, while “ Dreaming” is often used to refer to an individual's or group's beliefs. Sometimes creating their surroundings and sometimes changing into animals or people, the Dreamtime reflected the events and characters of daily life in the Australian desert. The Dreamtime for Aboriginal people is the time which the earth received its present form and in which the patterns and cycles of life begun.
  3. 3. The Australian Parliament House forecourt features a magnificent piece of Indigenous artwork created from mosaic tiles. The Forecourt Mosaic is based on a Central Desert dot-style painting by Michael Nelson Tjakamarra, a leading Aboriginal artist from the Papunya community of the Northern Territory. The mosaic is made up of approximately 90,000 hand-guillotined granite pieces in seven different colors and represents a Possum and Wallaby Dreaming.
  4. 5. Dot painting are the traditional visual art form of the Aborigines in Western Australia Central Desert
  5. 6. The canvas is covered in small dots of paint which create patterns and symbols
  6. 7. The dreamtime symbols can easily be recognized by those familiar with the Dreamtime Story illustrated.
  7. 8. Bright colors are now more common with the use of acrylic paint, but traditional dot painters used natural pigments such as ochre, crashed seeds.
  8. 12. What is certain is that “Ancestor Spirits” came to Earth in human and other forms and the land, the plants and animals were given their form as we know them today.
  9. 13. These Spirits also established relationships between groups and individuals, (whether people or animals) and where they traveled across the land, or came to a halt, they created rivers, hills, etc., and there are often stories attached to these places
  10. 14. These Spirits also established relationships between groups and individuals, (whether people or animals) and where they traveled across the land, or came to a halt, they created rivers, hills, etc., and there are often stories attached to these places
  11. 15. Once their work was done, the Ancestor Spirits changed again; into animals or stars or hills or other objects.
  12. 16. For Indigenous Australians, the past is still alive and vital today and will remain so into the future.
  13. 17. The Ancestor Spirits and their powers have not gone, they are present in the forms into which they changed at the end of the “Dreamtime” or ”reaming”, as the stories tell.
  14. 18. The stories have been handed down through the ages and are an integral part of an Indigenous person's “Dreaming”.
  15. 19. Each tribe has its individual dreamtime although some of the legends overlap. Most “Dreamtime” originates with the Giant Dog or the Giant Snake, and each is unique and colorful in its explanation.
  16. 20. Legends of the “Dreamtime” are handed down by word of mouth and by totem from generation to generation.
  17. 21. It involves secret rituals and rites, and some classified as “Men's Business” and some as “Women's Business”
  18. 22. Colorful, symbolic and enthusiastic dancing and corroborees are used to pass on the stories of the creation.
  19. 23. The Aboriginal Memorial of 200 painted tree trunks commemorating all the indigenous people who had died between 1788 and 1988 defending their land against invaders. Each tree trunk is a dupun or log coffin , which is used to mark the safe tradition of the soul of the deceased from this world to the next The National Gallery of Australia
  20. 24. Artists from Ramingining painted it to mark the Australian Bicentenary and it was accepted for display by the Biennale of Sydney in 1988
  21. 25. Sound : Sven Libaek - Dark World Pictures & text: net Arrangement: S anda Foişoreanu

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