http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1385101-curious-geological-phenomenon/
The Maori call NewZealand, Aotearoa whichmeans “The land of thelong white cloud”.New Zealand is located inOceania, in the ...
Moeraki, on the east coastof the South Island, south ofOamaru, is known worldwide for its famous boulders.The boulders for...
The Moeraki Spheres are huge spherical stones that are scattered over the sandy beaches, but theyare not like ordinary rou...
They were created by a process similarto the formation of oyster pearls, wherelayers of material cover a centralnucleus or...
Lime minerals in the sea accumulated on the core over time, and the concretion grewinto perfectly spherical shapes up to t...
The original mudstone seabed has since been uplifted to form coastal cliffs. Erosion of the cliffs hasreleased the three t...
Further erosion in the atmospherehas exposed a network of veins,which gives the boulders theappearance of turtle shells. S...
In Hawke’s Bay in the North Island, scientists have found that the central core of similar boulderscontained perfectly pre...
Scattered along the beach at Moerakiwhich is some 40 kilometers south ofOamaru, the boulders are a popular visitorattracti...
Emerging from the cliff, as if being bornfrom the earth, the World famous MoerakiBoulders are septerian concretionsformed ...
According to Maori legend, theorigin of the boulders dates fromthe loss of the Arai-te-uru, one ofthe large sailing canoes...
The reef which today extends seawards is the canoes petrified hull, while close by, in the shape ofa prominent rock, stand...
Strewn along the beach are the boulders which represent the eel baskets, calabashes, andkumaras washed ashore from the wre...
So, this history goes back as far as the legendary Arai-te-uru canoe, wrecked alongthe coast while searching for the preci...
Moeraki makes a fascinating stopover point, both for the dramatic coastal scenery and thecurious geological phenomenon on ...
Moeraki has a long history of Maori occupation, which is represented in the town today by theKotahitanga Maori Church and ...
Behind the town a road leads to the lighthouse where you can find a yellow-eyed penguin sanctuaryand a seal colony. There ...
Text and pictures: InternetCopyright: All the images belong to their authorsArangement: Sanda Foişoreanuwww.slideshare.net...
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon
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New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon

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Moeraki, on the east coast of the South Island, south of Oamaru, is known world wide for its famous boulders. The boulders formed over millions of years, but Moeraki has a human history only a few hundred years old.
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  • Kiwi is the nickname used internationally for people from New Zealand, as well as being a relatively common self-reference. The name derives from the kiwi, a flightless bird, which is native to, and the national symbol of, New Zealand. The usage is not offensive, being treated with pride and endearment as a uniquely recognizable term for the people of New Zealand.
  • History The first New Zealanders to be widely known as Kiwis were the military. The Regimental Signs for all New Zealand regiments feature the kiwi, including those that fought in the Second Boer War, then with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps in World War I. Much of the interaction between regiments and locals was done under the respective Regimental Sign, and the kiwi came to mean first the men of regiments and then all New Zealanders. Due to the relative isolation of New Zealand, many troops stayed in Europe (particularly at Beacon Hill, near Bulford on the Salisbury Plain, where they carved a chalk kiwi into the hill in 1918) for months or years until transport home could be arranged. The Oxford English Dictionary gives the first use of the 'Kiwi' to mean 'New Zealander' in 1918, in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force Chronicles. The nickname 'Kiwis' for New Zealand servicemen eventually became common usage in all war theatres
  • Following World War II the term was gradually attributed to all New Zealanders and today, throughout the world they are referred to as Kiwis, as well as often referring to themselves that way. Spelling of the word Kiwi, when used to describe the people, is often capitalized, and takes the plural form Kiwis. The bird's name is spelt with a lower-case k and, being a word of Māori origin, normally stays as kiwi when pluralized. Thus, two Kiwis refers to two people, whereas two kiwi refers to two birds. This linguistic nicety is well exemplified by the BNZ Save the Kiwi Conservation Trust, which uses the slogan "Kiwis saving kiwi".
  • What became of Araiteuru When Araiteuru arrived to the land of the long white cloud, they explored the lands trying to find a good place to settle. As they sailed down along side the east coast of the South Island trouble began to boil. Some of the men plunged over board to make their way to land and became mountains there. Maukatere (Mt Grey), Mt Tapuaenuku, Tawera (Mt Torlesse), and Te Kiekie (Mt Somers). Being some crewmembers short Araiteuru was blown mainly by Tawhiri Matea. Hipo the captain remained calm for he knew without a doubt that they were foresaken. As they came to Matakaea, Shag Point three waves hit with terrible force overturning the waka, and then to finish them off a cross wave hit. Hipo stubbornly stayed with his waka and became a reef. The waves all turned to stone and are known Old Man Range, Raggedy Ann, Rough Range and Horse Range.
  • The cargo was swept ashore near Moeraki and can still be seen today as almost perfect round boulders that were once eel pots, calabashes and kumara. The rest of the crew struggled ashore and grieved their losses. They were cold and although battered and disheartened they set out to find wood for a campfire that very night. There was nothing to be found and Puketapu went further on south to Matau, (Clutha River) where she found many. She bundled them up tying them together with a string of flax and a withe of toetoe stalks and made her way back to their landing place. As she went some of her sticks loosened and fell from her load. These sticks sprouted to be forests. Dawn came quickly and Puketapu was overcome by the light turning into a cone shaped hill near Waihemo, (Palmerston). She is recognized easily by the two gullies upon the hill, one filled with flax bushes and the other nothing but toetoe.
  • Aonui was sent for the water and he set out with two kelp bags. He travelled almost to Invercargill before finding fresh drinking water at the Mataura River and like Puketapu he was caught by the rising suns rays and was turned into a tall pillar of rock found on the Tokomairiro Beach. On either side of the rock there is kelp growing. Kaitangata was the artist aboard Araiteuru and he had bought his materials with him. When the sun rose he became a hill where can be seen the red ochre. The town is also known as Kaitangata.
  • Pakihiwi-tahi, One-shoulder did not go far at all. When he swam from the waka he was almost immediately turned to stone. He is seen as a lopsided hill between Waihemo and the sea. Aoraki, Aorangi (Mt Cook) is the tallest mountain in Aotearoa. It was said that one of the crew carried his son upon his shoulders and with the coming of light were turned into a mountain that is why it is so massively tall. Perhaps 150 mountains and ranges of the South Island are said to be the crew members of Araiteuru. The crew wandered far and wide and with the coming dawn they were turned to landmarks to remain forever.
  • In Māori mythology, Āraiteuru is the canoe in which brought the ancestors the Ngāi Tahu people of the South Island. The canoe was conveyed to New Zealand by the north-east wind, carrying the chiefs Kirikiri-ka-tata, Aroarokaehe, Mangaatua, Aoraki, Kakeroa, Te Horokoatu, Ritua, Ngamautaurua, Pokohiwitahi, Puketapu, Te Maro-tiri-a-te-rehu, Hikuroroa, Pahatea, Te Waioteao, and Hapekituaraki. The fishing net and the water gourd (calabash) of Āraiteuru were turned into stone at Moeraki in the South Island, where they can still be seen. The canoe itself remained at a place called Matakaea (Shag Point) (Tregear 1891:20, White 1887-1891, II:178-179).
  • Te Vaka is an Oceanic music group that performs original contemporary Pacific music or "South Pacific Fusion". The group was founded in 1995 by Opetaia Foa'i in New Zealand. They have toured the world constantly since 1997 and have won a number of awards including "Best Pacific Music Album" award for their albums Tutuki (2004) and Olatia (2007) from the New Zealand Music Awards and "Best Pacific Group" in the 2008 Pacific Music Awards They have also been acclaimed by the BBC as "the world's most successful band playing original contemporary Pacific music." Te Vaka is a group of eleven musicians and dancers from Tokelau , Tuvalu , Samoa , Cook Islands , and New Zealand brought together under the inspired leadership of award winning songwriter, Opetaia Foa'i. Te Vaka's music is "grounded in the rhythms of the Pacific by the use of pate (single and double log drums ) and pa'u (indigenous goat skin conga and bass drums )." Most of their songs are written in the Tokelauan language , with some also written in Samoan and Tuvaluan languages. They have been wowing international audiences since 1997, presenting a rich, luscious mix of Polynesia's ancient culture to the modern world.  
  • New Zealand Curious geological phenomenon

    1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1385101-curious-geological-phenomenon/
    2. 2. The Maori call NewZealand, Aotearoa whichmeans “The land of thelong white cloud”.New Zealand is located inOceania, in the SouthPacific Ocean.The official languages inNew Zealand are Englishand Maori.The Capital city of NewZealand is Wellington,located on the NorthIsland.
    3. 3. Moeraki, on the east coastof the South Island, south ofOamaru, is known worldwide for its famous boulders.The boulders formed overmillions of years, butMoeraki has a humanhistory only a few hundredyears old.
    4. 4. The Moeraki Spheres are huge spherical stones that are scattered over the sandy beaches, but theyare not like ordinary round boulders that have been shaped by rivers and pounding seas. Theseboulders are classed as septarian concretions, and were formed in ancient sea floor sediments.
    5. 5. They were created by a process similarto the formation of oyster pearls, wherelayers of material cover a centralnucleus or core. For the oyster, this coreis an irritating grain of sand. For theboulders, it was a fossil shell, bonefragment, or piece of wood
    6. 6. Lime minerals in the sea accumulated on the core over time, and the concretion grewinto perfectly spherical shapes up to three meters in diameter.
    7. 7. The original mudstone seabed has since been uplifted to form coastal cliffs. Erosion of the cliffs hasreleased the three ton captive boulders, which now lie in a haphazard jumble across the beach.
    8. 8. Further erosion in the atmospherehas exposed a network of veins,which gives the boulders theappearance of turtle shells. Similarboulders occur at Shag Point, andthe nearby swimming beach of Katiki.
    9. 9. In Hawke’s Bay in the North Island, scientists have found that the central core of similar boulderscontained perfectly preserved skeletons of turtles, sea snails and extinct reptiles, such as plesiosaurs
    10. 10. Scattered along the beach at Moerakiwhich is some 40 kilometers south ofOamaru, the boulders are a popular visitorattraction. The soft mudstone containingthe boulders was raised from the sea bedaround 15 million years ago and seaerosion of the cliff is exposing the erosion-resistant boulders.
    11. 11. Emerging from the cliff, as if being bornfrom the earth, the World famous MoerakiBoulders are septerian concretionsformed some 65 million years ago.Crystallization of calcium and carbonatesaround charged particles in muddyundersea sediments gradually formed theboulders in a process taking as long asfour million years.
    12. 12. According to Maori legend, theorigin of the boulders dates fromthe loss of the Arai-te-uru, one ofthe large sailing canoes thatcame from distant Hawaiki. Onher quest south for the preciousgreenstone, the canoe waswrecked near Shag Point(Matakaea).
    13. 13. The reef which today extends seawards is the canoes petrified hull, while close by, in the shape ofa prominent rock, stands the petrified body of her commander.
    14. 14. Strewn along the beach are the boulders which represent the eel baskets, calabashes, andkumaras washed ashore from the wreck. The name Moeraki (Moerangi) means “drowsy day”.
    15. 15. So, this history goes back as far as the legendary Arai-te-uru canoe, wrecked alongthe coast while searching for the precious stone of Te Wai Pounamu.
    16. 16. Moeraki makes a fascinating stopover point, both for the dramatic coastal scenery and thecurious geological phenomenon on the beaches.
    17. 17. Moeraki has a long history of Maori occupation, which is represented in the town today by theKotahitanga Maori Church and a pa site nearby. This small seaport town was the first Europeansettlement in North Otago.
    18. 18. Behind the town a road leads to the lighthouse where you can find a yellow-eyed penguin sanctuaryand a seal colony. There are other walks of ecological interest around the coast, and through theTrotter’s Gorge native forest. South of Moeraki is the town of Palmerston, where you can follow anhistorical scenic route to Central Otago.
    19. 19. Text and pictures: InternetCopyright: All the images belong to their authorsArangement: Sanda Foişoreanuwww.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Te Vaka - Lelei ilo tenei (better than this) Te Vaka - Sei Malelosa

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