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Colors of the Universe2

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1508522-colors-universe2/
YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS WORK AS PPSX HERE:
http://ma-planete.com/pps/websiteview/catid_26/id_442802/title_Colors-of-the-Universe2-beauty-in-the-little/

SEE ALSO PLEASE:
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/red-and-black3-14032617
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/red-and-black2-14028574
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/red-and-black1-14018476
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/colors-of-the-universe3-14012314
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/colors-of-the-universe1-14006874

Thank you!
Special Exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Colors of the Universe: Chinese Hardstone Carving
Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Although jade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster after polishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were also appreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), when an abundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperial patronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works.

Published in: Travel, Technology, Spiritual
  • YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE: http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1508522-colors-universe2/ YOU CAN DOWNLOAD THIS WORK AS PPSX HERE: http://ma-planete.com/pps/websiteview/catid_26/id_442802/title_Colors-of-the-Universe2-beauty-in-the-little/
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  • Thank you Mirka for your interest and support, thank you
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  • Dirce is a Greek name for girls meaning Fruit of the pine. Thank you Dirce for adding 'Colors of the Universe' to your favorites. THANKS
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  • I am so GLAD you like! THANK YOU Karin, Ren, Mireille, Saly, George (I love your comment in all shows of SlideShare!) and John. Thank you for your support, I am truly honored, THANKS
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  • Beautiful work of art,so small yet so attractive.......Thanks Michaela.
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Colors of the Universe2

  1. 1. 22
  2. 2. Flower Holder with Floral Design Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century China Carnelian and white agate H 11.4cm
  3. 3. Horse Carrying Books. Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century China Jade (nephrite) H. (11.6 cm)
  4. 4. Jar with Melons and Butterfly Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 17th century China Amethyst H. (7cm)
  5. 5. Ornament in the Shape of an Archaic Jade Disk Qing dynasty (1644–1911), 18th century Jade with enamel stand H 9.5cm
  6. 6. Ornament with Landscape and Figures Qing dynasty (1644–1911) China Amber H. (10.2cm)
  7. 7. Peanuts and Jujube Dates Qing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century China Chalcedony H. (2.9 cm)
  8. 8. Flower Holder with Pomegranate Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century China Rose quartz H 11.7cm
  9. 9. Pomegranates Qing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century China Agate H. (11.4 cm) As the Chinese character for “seed,” zi, is the same as that for “son,” the pomegranate with its many seeds is symbolic of having multiple sons to continue a family’s lineage.
  10. 10. The use of puns and rebuses to express wishes for longevity, good fortune, and even academic success is common in Chinese art. Pomegranates Qing dynasty (1644–1911)18th century China Agate H. (11.4 cm)
  11. 11. Vase with cover Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Kangxi period (1662–1722)China Jade, Nephrite, white with light greenish tint and mottling of white and light brown
  12. 12. Arhat (Luohan) Liao dynasty (907–1125) ca. 1000 China Glazed stoneware H. (104.8 cm)
  13. 13. Seated Buddha Qing dynasty (1644–1911)18th–19th century China Smoky quartz H (8.6 cm)
  14. 14. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto. Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century China Malachite H. (22.9 cm)
  15. 15. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto. Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century China Lapis lazuli H. (18.1 cm)
  16. 16. Seated Luohan (Arhat) in a Grotto. Ming dynasty (1368–1644) 15th century China Wood with pigment H. (114 cm)
  17. 17. Table Screen with Landscape Scene Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century China Jade (jadeite) H 17.3cm
  18. 18. Three Goats Qing dynasty (1644–1911)19th century China Rock crystal H 9.8cm
  19. 19. vase18th century China Carnelian and white agate H 10.2cm
  20. 20. Vase 18th century China Carnelian and white agate H. (16.5 cm)
  21. 21. Vase 18th century China Lapis lazuli H. (14.6 cm)
  22. 22. Vase in the Shape of a Bird Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th–19th century China Jade (nephrite)H. (13.5 cm)
  23. 23. vase 18th century China Carnelian and white agate H 7.9cm
  24. 24. Vase with Bamboo and Plum Tree Qing dynasty (1644–1911) 18th century China Chalcedony H 14.6cm
  25. 25. Vase with Bird and Flowers Qing dynasty (1644–1911) China Amethyst H. (15.2cm)
  26. 26. Vase with Bird and Flowers Qing dynasty (1644–1911) China Amethyst H. (15.2cm)
  27. 27. Vase with Bird and Flowers Qing dynasty (1644–1911) China Amethyst H. (15.2cm)
  28. 28. Stone carving is one of the oldest arts in China, its beginnings dating back to remote antiquity. Although jade, the mineral nephrite, was held in the highest esteem, all stones that could achieve a luster after polishing, be it agate, turquoise, malachite, chalcedony, quartz, jasper, or lapis lazuli, were also appreciated. Stone carving experienced an efflorescence during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), when an abundant supply of raw materials, exceptionally accomplished craftsmen, and, in particular, keen imperial patronage contributed to the creation of numerous superb works. The stone carvings of the Qing period can be grouped in three categories: personal adornments such as rings, bracelets, and pendants; articles for daily use (mainly in the scholar's studio) such as brush holders, water pots, and seals; and display pieces such as copies of antiques, miniature mountains, and animal and human figures, the latter being the largest of the group. The carvings can also be classified by their decorative style: archaic or classical, meaning their shapes were derived from ancient ritual vessels; "Western," which bore the influence of contemporary Mughal art from northern India; and new or modern, meaning novel shapes and designs created during the Qing dynasty. A common decorative theme, especially among works of the new style, was the use of rebuses, which are symbols associated with auspicious meanings, to convey wishes for prosperity, longevity, good fortune, perpetuation of a family line, or academic success. The tradition began early but remained largely in the popular culture until the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when significant social changes and increased imperial patronage helped elevate the rebus to the high art of the court.
  29. 29. Sound: Peter Kater and Nawang Khechog - The Dance of Innocents Text and pictures: Metropolitan Museum All  copyrights  belong to their  respective owners Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu https://plus.google.com/+SandaMichaela 2012

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