Melbourne MELBOURNE http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1179025-captain-cook-s-cottage-and-the-war-memo...
Melbourne is the capital and most populous city in the state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia a...
The metropolis is located on the large natural bay known as Port Phillip, with the city centre positioned at the estuary o...
 
The metropolitan area then extends south from the city centre, along the eastern and western shorelines of Port Phillip, a...
The city  was named by governor Richard Bourke in 1837, in honor of William Lamb—the 2nd Viscount Melbourne.  In  the coat...
In 1851   Melbourne became the capital city of the newly created colony of Victoria.
The Melbourne City Centre  is  also known as the "Central Business District" or "CBD”
 
Today, it is a centre for the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, sport and tourism. It is often referred to as the ...
Melbourne is an international cultural centre, with cultural endeavors spanning major events and festivals, drama, musical...
Melbourne  was the second city after Edinburgh to be named a UNESCO City of Literature
 
 
Melbourne Cricket Ground -The Spiritual Home of Australian Sport
Melbourne is a notable sporting location as the host city for the 1956 Summer Olympics games (the first Olympic Games ever...
Melbourne is home to three major annual international sporting events: the Australian Open (one of the four Grand Slam ten...
 
In recent years, the city has claimed the Sports Business title "World's Ultimate Sports City". The city is home...
 
T he city centre  is  positioned at the estuary of the Yarra River.
Melbourne is often referred to as Australia's garden city, and the state of Victoria was once known as the garden state.
Diana and the Hounds  (William Leslie Bowles1940) in Fitzroy Gardens
Captain Cook's Cottage is a cottage rebuilt in the picturesque Fitzroy Gardens to commemorate the voyages of Captain James...
Captain James Cook (7 November 1728– 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator and cartographer, ultimately risi...
 
 
 
For Australia, as for many nations, the First World War remains the most costly conflict in terms of deaths and casualties...
The Melbourne War Memorial, more commonly known as the Shrine of Remembrance, is the largest memorial in all of Victoria a...
 
Built from Tynong granite, the stately monument's design was inspired by the Tomb of Mausolus at Halicarnassus and the Par...
Eureka Tower is a 297.3-metre skyscraper located in the Southbank precinct of Melbourne (2006). The project was designed b...
 
 
 
 
 
 
John 'Jack' Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher beare...
After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from...
He continued this work for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key...
 
 
Sound : I Still Call Australia Home Ken Davis _ Ocean Radiance Pictures  and  arangement:  Sanda   Foişoreanu www.slidesha...
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Australia Melbourne1 Captain Cook's cottage and the War Memorial

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Captain Cook's Cottage is a cottage rebuilt in the picturesque Fitzroy Gardens to commemorate the voyages of Captain James Cook, discoverer of Australia.
The Melbourne War Memorial, more commonly known as the Shrine of Remembrance, is the largest memorial in all of Victoria and is probably Melbourne's most visited and recognized landmarks. It was built to remember the soldiers and others who died during World War I and all armed conflicts and peacekeeping missions since.
For Australia, as for many nations, the First World War remains the most costly conflict in terms of deaths and casualties. From a population of fewer than five million, 416,809 men enlisted, of which over 60,000 were killed and 156,000 wounded, gassed, or taken prisoner.
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  • « Vires acquirit eundo »  ( Elle acquiert des forces dans sa course) Found on the coat of arms. The motto ‘Vires acquirit eundo’ (meaning, in its literal translation, ‘we gather strength as we go’) was suggested to the Mayor of Melbourne by the first Judge of the district (Judge Willis), a well-known Latin scholar who, recalling the passage in Virgil’s fourth book of the Aenoid – “Fame, malum quo allud veloclus ollum, Mobilitate viget, viresque acquirit eundo” – thought it would be appropriate for the new Town Council. Alderman Condell and his fellow aldermen and councillors also must have thought it appropriate, for the three words ‘Vires acquirit eundo’ were adopted by the Council as the motto for the Town. Curiously, the passage quoted refers to the Roman goddess, Rumour. The lines preceding the text used for the motto refer to Rumour as she raced through Africa and state that of all the pests Rumour is the swiftest. The actual motto translates as follows: “In her freedom of movement lies her power, and she gathers strength with her going.”   Quand Pierre le Grand vint à Paris, il visita l'hôtel des Monnaies ; on frappa en sa présence une médaille dont la légende était une allusion au résultat fécond de ses voyages : Vires acquirit eundo . tout progrès social contient le germe d’un progrès nouveau, vires acquirit eundo ,
  • Captain Cook's Cottage is a cottage rebuilt in the picturesque Fitzroy Gardens to commemorate the voyages of Captain James Cook, discoverer of Australia.
  • The first arms of Melbourne were granted on January 30, 1940 and are similar to the arms used at present. In the old arms the first quarter showed the whale, the second the fleece, the third the bull and the fourth the ship. The supporters were added in 1970. The arms are based on the seal used by the city from 1843-1940. The seal showed the same figures in the quarters, but in the sequence as in the present arms. The cross in the arms is the cross of St. George, the patron saint of England and taken from the English flag. The four symbols in the quarters represent the main activities of which the economy of Melbourne was based in the mid 19 th century : whaling, sheep and cattle rearing and processing, and shipping. The crest shows a kangaroo, an obvious local symbol. The lion supporters were taken from the arms of Lord Melbourne, Prime Minister of Great Britain, after whom the city was named in 1837. To distinguish the supporters the lions in the arms of the city are augmented with mural crowns.
  • Captain Cook's Cottage was originally built in 1755 in Great Ayton Yorkshire England and purchased in 1933 by Sir Russell Grimwade as a centenary gift to the people and State of Victoria. When Melbourne celebrated its centenary in 1934 the cottage was moved, brick by brick from Great Ayrton to Melbourne. It was shipped in 253 crates complete with a ivy cutting which had grown on the original building. Today the house is covered by the ivy. This wonderful building built by Cooks' parents will give the visitor an idea of life in the 1700's, but keep in mind James Cook himself almost certainly never lived in it. The Cottage originally stood on an extremity of the village of Great Ayton in the county of Yorkshire. Cook's father who had gone to Great Ayton from Marton to be a "hind" or bailiff on Thomas Skottowe's farm, Airey Holme, either built, rebuilt or bought it in 1755. A site in the Fitzroy Gardens was selected to complement the cottage with its large shady European trees and the construction work was completed in six months. The cottage was handed over to the Lord Mayor, H. Gengoult Smith by Russell Grimwade on the 15th October, 1934 during a centenary ceremony.
  • Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty and Royal Society. This notice came at a crucial moment both in his personal career and in the direction of British overseas exploration, and led to his commission in 1766 as commander of HM Bark Endeavour for the first of three Pacific voyages. Cook charted many areas and recorded several islands and coastlines on European maps for the first time. His achievements can be attributed to a combination of seamanship, superior surveying and cartographic skills, courage in exploring dangerous locations to confirm the facts (for example dipping into the Antarctic Circle repeatedly and exploring around the Great Barrier Reef), an ability to lead men in adverse conditions, and boldness both with regard to the extent of his explorations and his willingness to exceed the instructions given to him by the Admiralty. Cook was killed in Hawaii in a fight with Hawaiians during his third exploratory voyage in the Pacific in 1779.
  • The cottage has undergone two restorations. The first was undertaken in the late 1950's and the most recent in 1978, when a thorough effort was made to investigate and restore the building, furnish it with material appropriate to the period, and surround it with a garden of eighteenth century character. Cooks’ Cottage celebrated its 75th Anniversary in Melbourne with a day of activities on Saturday 17 October, 2009 in the Fitzroy Gardens.
  • The original thatched cottage in which Cook was born at Marton-in-Cleveland was demolished in 1786 and so the Great Ayton family cottage is the only concrete historical link we have with Captain Cook's origins. In 1933, the last owner of the cottage, Mrs. Dixon put the cottage up for sale and it was suggested that it would make an ideal focus piece for Victoria's centenary in 1934. The prominent Melburnian Russell Grimwade agreed to buy the cottage and present it as a gift to the Victorian people. However, a difficulty arose in that the patriotic Mrs. Dixon had stipulated that cottage should remain in Britain. She had rejected offers from wealthy Americans for this reason, but she was persuaded to accede to Victoria's claim on the cottage as Australia was, after all, still "in the Empire". The cottage was purchased by Russell Grimwade in 1933, dismantled, and shipped to Melbourne in 253 packing cases, arriving April, 1934. As the cottage structure had been altered considerably by a succession of owners following the Cook family's occupation, its Australian assemblers had the task of restoring the cottage as accurately as research and guess work would permit to its mid 18th century appearance.
  • In 1933 a cottage in Great Ayton, Yorkshire which had belonged to Captain Cook's parents came on the market. This aroused great interest in Australia, and soon Russell Grimwade (a local scientist, businessman and philanthropist) had agreed to purchase it for Victoria and have it transported to Melbourne. After some debate about where the cottage should be rebuilt and for what purpose it should be used, the current location of the Fitzroy Gardens was decided upon. The dismantled cottage arrived in Melbourne in April 1934 and was opened in October that year. Over one of the doorways is the inscription "JGC 1755" (James and Grace Cook - the parents of Captain James Cook). Did Captain Cook spend his boyhood in that cottage? If the date 1755 indicates the year in which it was built or purchased by his parents then the answer is no. Cook was then aged twenty-seven and had long since left Great Ayton to become a seaman. If, as is possible, the date indicated the year in which his parents rebuilt the cottage then he may have spent some of his boyhood between the age of eight and seventeen there.
  • Gallipoli campaign When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a Federal Commonwealth for thirteen years. In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, under a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied Gallipoli casualties included 21,255 from the UK, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war. Though the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives of capturing Istanbul and knocking Ottoman Empire out of the war, the Australian and New Zealand troops' actions during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an "Anzac legend" became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present
  • Gallipoli campaign When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a Federal Commonwealth for thirteen years. In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, under a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied Gallipoli casualties included 21,255 from the UK, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war. Though the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives of capturing Istanbul and knocking Ottoman Empire out of the war, the Australian and New Zealand troops' actions during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an "Anzac legend" became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present
  • Gallipoli campaign When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a Federal Commonwealth for thirteen years. In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, under a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied Gallipoli casualties included 21,255 from the UK, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war. Though the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives of capturing Istanbul and knocking Ottoman Empire out of the war, the Australian and New Zealand troops' actions during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an "Anzac legend" became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present
  • Gallipoli campaign When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a Federal Commonwealth for thirteen years. In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, under a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied Gallipoli casualties included 21,255 from the UK, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war. Though the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives of capturing Istanbul and knocking Ottoman Empire out of the war, the Australian and New Zealand troops' actions during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an "Anzac legend" became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present
  • The Melbourne War Memorial, more commonly known as the Shrine of Remembrance, is the largest memorial in all of Victoria and is probably Melbourne's most visited and recognized landmarks. It was built to remember the soldiers and others who died during World War I and all armed conflicts and peacekeeping missions since. For Australia, as for many nations, the First World War remains the most costly conflict in terms of deaths and casualties. From a population of fewer than five million, 416,809 men enlisted, of which over 60,000 were killed and 156,000 wounded, gassed, or taken prisoner.
  • Australia Melbourne1 Captain Cook's cottage and the War Memorial

    1. 1. Melbourne MELBOURNE http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1179025-captain-cook-s-cottage-and-the-war-memorial-melbourne/
    2. 2. Melbourne is the capital and most populous city in the state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia after Sydney (approximate population of four million).
    3. 3. The metropolis is located on the large natural bay known as Port Phillip, with the city centre positioned at the estuary of the Yarra River.
    4. 5. The metropolitan area then extends south from the city centre, along the eastern and western shorelines of Port Phillip, and expands into the hinterland. The city centre is situated in the municipality known as the City of Melbourne, and the metropolitan area consists of a further 30 municipalities. Melbourne was founded in 1835 (47 years after the European settlement of Australia) by settlers from Van Diemen's Land.
    5. 6. The city was named by governor Richard Bourke in 1837, in honor of William Lamb—the 2nd Viscount Melbourne. In the coat of arms t he lion supporters were taken from the arms of Lord Melbourne, Prime Minister of Great Britain, after whom the city was named in 1837. The supporters were added in 1970.
    6. 7. In 1851 Melbourne became the capital city of the newly created colony of Victoria.
    7. 8. The Melbourne City Centre is also known as the "Central Business District" or "CBD”
    8. 10. Today, it is a centre for the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, sport and tourism. It is often referred to as the "cultural capital of Australia”
    9. 11. Melbourne is an international cultural centre, with cultural endeavors spanning major events and festivals, drama, musicals, comedy, music, art, architecture, literature, film and television
    10. 12. Melbourne was the second city after Edinburgh to be named a UNESCO City of Literature
    11. 15. Melbourne Cricket Ground -The Spiritual Home of Australian Sport
    12. 16. Melbourne is a notable sporting location as the host city for the 1956 Summer Olympics games (the first Olympic Games ever held in the southern hemisphere), along with the 2006 Commonwealth Games.
    13. 17. Melbourne is home to three major annual international sporting events: the Australian Open (one of the four Grand Slam tennis tournaments), the Melbourne Cup (horse racing), and the Australian Grand Prix (Formula One).
    14. 19. In recent years, the city has claimed the Sports Business title "World's Ultimate Sports City". The city is home to the National Sports Museum, which until 2003 was located outside the members pavilion at the Melbourne Cricket Ground and reopened in 2008 in the Olympic Stand.
    15. 21. T he city centre is positioned at the estuary of the Yarra River.
    16. 22. Melbourne is often referred to as Australia's garden city, and the state of Victoria was once known as the garden state.
    17. 23. Diana and the Hounds (William Leslie Bowles1940) in Fitzroy Gardens
    18. 24. Captain Cook's Cottage is a cottage rebuilt in the picturesque Fitzroy Gardens to commemorate the voyages of Captain James Cook, discoverer of Australia.
    19. 25. Captain James Cook (7 November 1728– 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator and cartographer, ultimately rising to the rank of Captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean during which he achieved the first European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
    20. 29. For Australia, as for many nations, the First World War remains the most costly conflict in terms of deaths and casualties. From a population of fewer than five million, 416,809 men enlisted, of which over 60,000 were killed and 156,000 wounded, gassed, or taken prisoner.
    21. 30. The Melbourne War Memorial, more commonly known as the Shrine of Remembrance, is the largest memorial in all of Victoria and is probably Melbourne's most visited and recognized landmarks. It was built to remember the soldiers and others who died during World War I and all armed conflicts and peacekeeping missions since.
    22. 32. Built from Tynong granite, the stately monument's design was inspired by the Tomb of Mausolus at Halicarnassus and the Parthenon in Athens. One of the benefits of the young country was their ability to use the hindsight of other cultures and countries when building monuments and if that is any indication that the Shrine of Remembrance would have such grandeur, than the architects and veterans who designed acted brilliantly.
    23. 33. Eureka Tower is a 297.3-metre skyscraper located in the Southbank precinct of Melbourne (2006). The project was designed by Melbourne architectural firm Fender Katsalidis Architects
    24. 40. John 'Jack' Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I.
    25. 41. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation
    26. 42. He continued this work for three and a half weeks, often under fire, until he was killed. Simpson and his Donkey are a key part of the 'Anzac legend’
    27. 45. Sound : I Still Call Australia Home Ken Davis _ Ocean Radiance Pictures and arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Melbourne

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