Bali 44 Dance tradition

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Traditional Balinese dances are the oldest form of performing arts in Bali. Traditional dances can be divided into two types, sacred dance called Wali and entertainment dance called Bebalihan.
Wali (sacred dance) is usually performed in some ritual ceremonies only because it has strong magical powers and only can be performed by specific dancers. Bebalihan are usually performed in social events. In addition to entertain, Bebalihan also has other purposes such as: welcoming guests, celebration of harvests, or gathering crowds. Bebalihan has more variations than Wali.

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  • Thank you Rachela for your interest. The photos and text are the merit of https://natharianetravel.wordpress.com/2013/07/02/balinese-dances/
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  • Bali 44 Dance tradition

    1. 1. 4444
    2. 2. Balinese dances are a very ancient dance tradition that is a part of the religious and artistic expression among the Balinese people, native to Bali island, Indonesia. Balinese dance is dynamic, angular and intensely expressive. The Balinese dancers express the story of dance-drama through the whole bodily gestures; fingers, hands and body gestures to head and eyes movements. Most of dances in Bali are connected to Hindu rituals, such as the Sanghyang Dedari sacred dance than invoked hyang spirits that believed to possess the dancers in trance state during the performance. Other Balinese dances are not linked to religious rituals and created for certain purposes, such as Pendet welcoming dance and Joged dance that is social dance for entertainment purpose. Traditional Balinese dances are the oldest form of performing arts in Bali. Traditional dances can be divided into two types, sacred dance called Wali and entertainment dance called Bebalihan. Wali (sacred dance) is usually performed in some ritual ceremonies only because it has strong magical powers and only can be performed by specific dancers. Bebalihan are usually performed in social events. In addition to entertain, Bebalihan also has other purposes such as: welcoming guests, celebration of harvests, or gathering crowds. Bebalihan has more variations than Wali.
    3. 3. Puspa Wresti (Welcome Dance) This dance represents the joyful reception of god for a temple celebration. Performed at the beginning of a show by a number of young girls, the dance is meant to welcome the audience with appreciation and peace.
    4. 4. Panyembrama (The Welcome Dance the dance was performed for the first time at the Pandaan Festival in 1971, and now Panyembrama Dance is not only performed on the commercial stage, but is also performed as the opening dance of religious ceremonies in temples. Among the new dances it is often performed. Panyembrama (Greeting distinguished guests) is widely used as an opening welcome dance for dignitaries and tourists
    5. 5. Cendrawasih (the Dance of the Birds of Paradise) is a recent creation. This dance portrays the Cendrawasih, a beautiful bird of paradise. The dancers enact the displays, behaviours and arrogance of these birds in traditional Balinese fashion.
    6. 6. Telek Dancers wearing white masks perform this dance illustrating the battle between virtue and vice. Derived from the ancient India epic Ramayana and Mahabharata
    7. 7. Telek dance depicts the traditional Balinese view that everything has two sides; that the world is knit together with two opposing elements
    8. 8. Kelinci (Rabbit Dance) This dance created by a graduate of the Academy of Performing Arts was designed to convey the cuteness of rabbits. It is performed by young girls and is very cute.
    9. 9. Panji Semirang This is the story of a princess who changes her name and cuts her hair because her husband has married another woman. She pretends to be a man and goes to live in the forest followed by her helpers
    10. 10. Panji Semirang
    11. 11. Panji Semirang
    12. 12. Panji Semirang
    13. 13. Tarunajaya (The Victory of Youth) Tarunajaya (The Victory of Youth) is one of Bali's most celebrated Kebyar pieces. The fast brilliance of the music offers scope for great virtuoso performance
    14. 14. Olèg Tamulilingan (The Dance of the Bumblebees) Among the many virtuoso dances, one deserves special mention. It is Olèg Tamulilingan, the dance of the bumblebees, which was unique in featuring a male-female duet and was commissioned by the English impressario John Coast for the Balinese tour of the UK and USA in the early 1950s. Since then the number of Balinese dances has burgeoned.
    15. 15. It is unclear when Balinese virtuoso dance began. While some accounts place its origin in the seventeenth century, such a date is entirely speculative. It seems far more likely that the kind of dance for which Bali became famous began to emerge at the end of the pre-colonial period in the last decades of the nineteenth century when foreign theatre and dance forms, like Chinese opera and Stamboel, reached the island from Java. For it would appear that virtuoso dance was a complex cultural response to political and social changes going on in Balinese society. The old feudal order, faced with defeat by the Dutch, committed mass suicide and Bali became the favourite playground for an international artistic élite and, subsequently, tourists. To meet the demands of these visitors, who expected something similar to their idea of virtuoso dance, such as ballet, the Balinese adapted their theatre and temple dances, by creating tari lepas - 'free dance', that is dance stripped of its historical, literary and cultural context.
    16. 16. The earliest, and still the most famous, of these dances, Lègong, probably dates from the late 1880s when it was danced by males. It was not until the 1920s that Lègong assumed something like its present form and bloomed into a rich genre of which Lègong Kuntul is a beautiful example. Around 1914-16 in North Bali, where the Dutch had first arrived, a brilliant new form of gamelan music, Kebyar, emerged and with it gradually much more dynamic dances. When the Japanese invaded the Netherlands East Indies, including Bali, in 1942, the new military commander commissioned bebancihan, or cross-gender, dance, where young women danced male roles, a genre that has remained popular.
    17. 17. Legong Legong is a traditional Balinese dance originally performed in the palace courtyard to entertain the king. There are several stories that can be enacted but it is always performed by young female dancers in colourful outfits with elaborate headdresses. The dance is characterized by intricate finger movements, expressive gestures and exaggerated eye movements.
    18. 18. Kecak is a form of Balinese dance and music drama that developed in the 1930s in Bali. It is performed primarily by men, although by 2006, a few women's kecak groups exist.
    19. 19. Also known as the Ramayana Monkey Chant, the piece, performed by a circle of 150 or more performers wearing checked cloth around their waists, percussively chanting "cak" and throwing up their arms, depicts a battle from the Ramayana. The monkey-like Vanara helped Prince Rama fight the evil King Ravana. Kecak has roots in sanghyang, a trance- inducing exorcism dance
    20. 20. There is a great richness of dance forms and styles in Bali; and particularly notable are those ritualistic dance dramas which involve Rangda, the witch and the great beast Barong. In Bali there are various categories of dance, including epic performances such as the omnipresent Mahabharata and Ramayana. Certain ceremonies at village temples feature a special performance of a dance- drama, a battle between the mythical characters Rangda, the witch representing evil, and Barong, the lion or dragon, representing good. Among the dance traditions in Bali, the following deserve special mention: Legong Barong Kecak
    21. 21. Barong dancer
    22. 22. Barong is a well known mythological dance in Bali and it is narrating the fight between good and evil. Barong represents the good spirit and Rangda the evil spirit. The Barong is a large lion type creature. A battle ensues and the Barong's followers begin to attack Rangda with their daggers.
    23. 23. Barong
    24. 24. Rangda and Barong
    25. 25. Rangda, being a witch, is able to use magical powers to turn the daggers against their owners, who fall into a trance and try to stab themselves.
    26. 26. The Barong, also having magical powers, protects his followers from harm and Rangda retreats into the forest to rest and prepare for the next battle. The trance of the Barong`s followers is often very real and therefore there is always a priest on hand to revive the dancers with holy water
    27. 27. Text and pictures: Internet & https://natharianetravel.wordpress.com/2013/07/02/bal Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Ni Madé Pujawati dances Tarunajaya

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