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Portugal Evora 2 Arts & Crafts in Évora

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YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE:
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PLEASE SEE ALSO:
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/evora1
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/the-cathedral-of-vora
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/evora4
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/evora5
http://www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda/evora6
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As a UNESCO World Heritage site, Évora has plenty of traditional architecture and design to boast about. However, when you scratch beneath the surface of the delightful Roman, Gothic and Romantic buildings, there is a thriving arts and crafts scene in the city that meshes the traditional and the modern with much aplomb.
If you are looking for some interesting mementos of your trip to Évora, either as a gift for a friend or loved one or as a decoration for your home, there is plenty here to choose from to suit all budgets and tastes.
Portugal is renowned for its crafts such as traditional basketware, carved cork wood, ceramics and filigree gold jewellery, as well as for its lace-making and traditional costume making and Évora offers a good selection of each. Avenida 5 de Outubro is the main shopping street in Évora and home to several such shops, stocking examples that are both intricate and more rustic. Take a stroll down the full length of Avenida 5 de Outubro to weigh up your many options before you decide to take the plunge and buy. Portugal has a long history in ceramics and is well-known for its beautiful hand-painted figurines and decorative items as well as its ceramic tiles. While many of Évora’s grand buildings display numerous hand-painted tiles with designs of exquisite detail, the modern-day city retains this strong tradition and is home to various ateliers where original works are produced, as well as many shops selling more mainstream versions.

Portugal Evora 2 Arts & Crafts in Évora

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1966396-evora2/
  2. 2. Oak on wheat field, a typical image of the Alentejo region, Portugal. The area is commonly known as the "bread basket" of Portugal, a region of vast open countryside with undulating plains and rich fertile soil. The landscape is primarily one of soft rolling hills and plains, with cork oaks and olive trees, or the occasional vine
  3. 3. The lightness and resistance of cork makes it a very suitable material, unspoilt by rain, to make also the pails used to keep food hot and the ladles to drink water from the earthenware pots. The Alentejo Province is a region of wide plains to the south of the Tagus River (Rio Tejo). In the heart of this region, at a distance of 130 km from Lisbon, lies the city of Évora.
  4. 4. Alentejo is a south-central region of Portugal. The origin of its name, "Além-Tejo", literally translates to "Beyond the Tagus" or "Across the Tagus". The region is separated from the rest of Portugal by the Tagus river, and extends to the south where it borders the Algarve. Alentejo is a region known for its polyphonic singing groups, comparable to those found on Sardinia and Corsica. The region is the home of the world's most important area for the growing of cork. Cork-oak, known in Portugal as "sobreiro", has been grown commercially in the region for the past 300 years, with the areas between the trees typically given over to grazing, or on the more productive soils, to the growing of citrus fruit, vines or olives. As a consequence, a uniquely rich and varied eco-system has developed.
  5. 5. The bark of the cork-oak is still harvested by teams of men using locally made hand-axes. No mechanical method has yet been invented that will allow the harvest to be achieved as effectively. The stripping of the bark is performed only in mid summer, when the bark can be removed more easily.
  6. 6. The cork-oak (Quercus suber) is the only tree known that will allow this regular stripping of bark without damage. The harvest of one mature tree provides sufficient bark to produce about 4,000 wine bottle corks. The industry provides employment for about 60,000 workers.
  7. 7. Due to part of the town which being enclosed by ancient walls preserved in its original state and, to its monuments dating from various historical periods, Évora is included in UNESCO's World Heritage list.
  8. 8. Portugal has a long history in ceramics and is well-known for its beautiful handpainted figurines and decorative items as well as its ceramic tiles. While many of Évora’s grand buildings display numerous handpainted tiles with designs of exquisite detail, the modern-day city retains this strong tradition and is home to various ateliers where original works are produced, as well as many shops selling more mainstream versions.
  9. 9. The many monuments erected by the major artists of each period now testify to Évora's lively cultural, artistic and historical past. The variety of architectural styles (romanic, gothic, manueline, mannerist, baroque), the palaces and even the squares and narrow streets are all part of the rich heritage of this museum-city. Évora is also famous for its gastronomy and handicraft.
  10. 10. A popular theme for Estremoz clay figures, Love is Blind
  11. 11. Text: Internet Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu Internet Gabriela Cristescu Copyrights of the photos belong to each photographer Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Quim Barreiros - As mulheres e o vinho

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