http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384737-new-zealand-arts-crafts1/
Aotearoa is the most widely known and accepted Māori name for New Zealand. The originalderivation of Aotearoa is not known...
Before the arrival of the Europeans Māori literature, stories and legends were handed downboth orally and through weavings...
Te Toi Whakairo is the art of Māori carving, and Tohunga Whakairo were the greatcarvers - the master craftsmen. A master c...
Carving used to be a tapu art, subject to therules and laws of tapu. The pieces of woodfalling aside as the carver worked ...
The history, traditions, language and religion of the Māori make up an integral part of the carving art. To the Māori,all ...
Felling a tree was to cut down a descendant ofTane, the god of forests and of man. Beforecommitting such an act, a karakia...
The Māori differed from otherPolynesians in that they preferredcurves to straight lines in much oftheir carvings.
Many carvings take the distinctivekoru spiral form, similar to that of acurving stalk, or a bulb.
The koru (Māori for "bight” or "loop”) is a spiral shape based on the shape of a new unfurlingsilver fern frond and symbol...
Koru can also refer to bone carvings. Thosegenerally take the shape of the uncurling fernplant. When bone is worn on the s...
The koru is used in a stylised form asthe logo of Air New Zealand and as aniconic symbol of New Zealand flora.
The koru design is an integral symbol in Maori art forms. Both on itselfInternet image - Koru   as well as incorporated in...
The circular movement towards an inner coil refers to ‘going back to the beginning’. Theunfurling frond itself is symbolic...
Text: Internet                                                Pictures and arangement:                                    ...
New Zealand arts and crafts1
New Zealand arts and crafts1
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New Zealand arts and crafts1

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Maori culture has historically been oral. This means they had no written language to pass on cultural heritage. As a result carvings and other art forms flourished as a means to pass on ancestry, major historic events, beliefs, legends, and other cultural elements. Even upon today the designs and their symbolism still tell the wonderful Maori tales. That’s why Maori symbols form such a substantial part of the national Maori identity and culture.

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  • @1456789
    Muchas gracias querida amiga, besos.
    All my comments was deleted today.....
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  • Muy interesante, no conozco nada de este arte y me parece maravilloso. Siempre aprendo algo de tí. Gracias, Pilar
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  • Thank you Tracee for adding this presentation to your favourites. Thank you. I also love Marcel Proust's quotes 'The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.'
    Thank you
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  • Thank you Nikos for comment, our world is so beautiful!
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  • Very nice presentation!!! Thanks for sharing and congratulations dear Michaela !! Wish you a beautiful Sunday! Best greetings from Greece. I wish you also a wonderful week. Nikos
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New Zealand arts and crafts1

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1384737-new-zealand-arts-crafts1/
  2. 2. Aotearoa is the most widely known and accepted Māori name for New Zealand. The originalderivation of Aotearoa is not known for certain. The word can be broken up as:ao = cloud, tea = white and roa = long, and it is therefore usually glossed as "the land of thelong white cloud".
  3. 3. Before the arrival of the Europeans Māori literature, stories and legends were handed downboth orally and through weavings and carvings. Some carvings are over 500 years old.
  4. 4. Te Toi Whakairo is the art of Māori carving, and Tohunga Whakairo were the greatcarvers - the master craftsmen. A master carver was highly considered. The Māoribelieved that the gods created and communicated through the master carvers.
  5. 5. Carving used to be a tapu art, subject to therules and laws of tapu. The pieces of woodfalling aside as the carver worked werenever thrown away, neither were they usedfor the cooking of food. Women were notpermitted near the carvings.
  6. 6. The history, traditions, language and religion of the Māori make up an integral part of the carving art. To the Māori,all things possess a spirit (wairua), and a mauri (life force)
  7. 7. Felling a tree was to cut down a descendant ofTane, the god of forests and of man. Beforecommitting such an act, a karakia (ritualincantation) was recited by the Tohunga, inorder to ensure that the act of felling anoffspring of Tane could be carried out safely.
  8. 8. The Māori differed from otherPolynesians in that they preferredcurves to straight lines in much oftheir carvings.
  9. 9. Many carvings take the distinctivekoru spiral form, similar to that of acurving stalk, or a bulb.
  10. 10. The koru (Māori for "bight” or "loop”) is a spiral shape based on the shape of a new unfurlingsilver fern frond and symbolizing new life, growth, strength and peace. It is an integral symbolin Māori art, carving and tattoos. The circular shape of the koru helps to convey the idea ofperpetual movement while the inner coil suggests a return to the point of origin.
  11. 11. Koru can also refer to bone carvings. Thosegenerally take the shape of the uncurling fernplant. When bone is worn on the skin, itchanges colour as oil is absorbed. The Māoritook this to symbolise that the spirit of theperson was inhabiting the pendant. Whensomeone gives a pendant to someone else, itis the custom that they wear it for a time sothat part of their spirit is given as well.
  12. 12. The koru is used in a stylised form asthe logo of Air New Zealand and as aniconic symbol of New Zealand flora.
  13. 13. The koru design is an integral symbol in Maori art forms. Both on itselfInternet image - Koru as well as incorporated in more intricate designs.
  14. 14. The circular movement towards an inner coil refers to ‘going back to the beginning’. Theunfurling frond itself is symbolic for new life, hope, perfection, a new start, awakening, personalgrowth, purity, nurturing, a new phase (in life), rebirth, the spirit of rejuvenation, and peace.
  15. 15. Text: Internet Pictures and arangement: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Tarakihi (The Locust) - Kiri te Kanava Traditional maori song - Maori Haka

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