A weekend walk in Barcelona11

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The roof of Palau Güell, a fantastic space.

Published in: Travel
  • Thank you Santiago for adding this presentation to your favourites
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  • Estoy muy contento Rosa que te haya gustado esta presentación tanto por agregarlo a tus preferidos. Gracias mil. Un cordial saludo
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  • Thank you Pilar and John, THANK YOU!!!

    'Palau Güell, or Guell Palace, was the first of many commissions that Antoni Gaudí received from Eusebi Güell. Guell Palace only takes up 72 x 59 feet (22 x 18 meters) and is located in what was at the time one of the least desirable areas of Barcelona. With limited space but an unlimited budget, Gaudí built a home and social center
    and the crowning glory of Palau Güell is the flat roof dotted with 20 different mosaic-covered sculptures that ornament the chimneys, ventilation covers, and stairwells. Functional rooftop sculptures later became a trademark of Gaudi's work'.
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  • Es increible lo que hacía Gaudí con trozos de cerámica que recogía en las fabricas, que maravilloso tejado parece un bosque, era un auténtico genio. Mis felicitaciones por estos maravillosos trabajos. Gracias, Pilar
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A weekend walk in Barcelona11

  1. 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/sandamichaela-1923418-walk-barcelona11/
  2. 2. Palau Guell (Guell Palace) is a magnificent town house in Barcelona's gothic quarter on the street "Nou de la Rambla" close to La Rambla. This was one of the homes of Gaudí's patron, Count Eusebi Güell, who commissioned the building in 1885 and made it his family home for 20 years. The spectacular Palau Güell (palace), constructed by Gaudí is now classed as World Heritage by UNESCO.
  3. 3. In the attic were the quarters of the house personnel and service rooms such as the kitchen, the food locker and the washing rooms.
  4. 4. Perhaps the most striking space of all is the roof. This is where Jack Nicholson looked for María Schneider in Antonioni’s “The Passenger”. It’s also where Gaudí used his patron’s Limoges dinner service to tile one of the chimneys in broken white porcelain fragments. It seems Güell had crockery to spare and didn’t mind Gaudí trashing it in a good cause. There are eighteen chimneys and ventilators, some plain brick, some trencadís jig-saw puzzle fragments of tiles, decorating geometrical or organically shaped caps poised on columns
  5. 5. Gaudí was the first Spanish architect to recover the old Moorish style of using fragments of tile to decorate a surface and on the roof of the Palau Güell, his first attempt at trencadís, he was riffing on the theme, showing off subtle variations on similar structures, playing with the effects of the changing light. It makes magical landscape against the backdrop of old
  6. 6. More than one art historian has discussed the theory that the young Picasso, who lived just a few houses away, might, could or must (according to choice) have been influenced by Gaudí’s trencadís and stained glass designs before painting his later cubist pictures…
  7. 7. The central spire is not covered with tile but with the vitrified linings from the lime burning ovens at Güell’s quarry and cement factory at Garraf. Repeated firings in the kilns gave the stone the grey, glassy sheen you can see today on the spire
  8. 8. Parabolic windows pierce the lower part of the spire and above them are larger parabolic arches. These all let light into the dome above the hall giving its atmospheric lighting effect.
  9. 9. Finally the spire is topped with a lightning conductor in the shape of a Greek cross and a flying bat, one of the symbols of Barcelona
  10. 10. Güell was delighted with the building and Gaudí was happy to have such a showcase for his fertile imagination and creative genius. Nevertheless, Güell didn’t use the house much; he lived there on and off until 1906 when he moved to a semi-reclusive life in the Park Güell, his failed experiment in social housing
  11. 11. The house was, in fact, uncomfortable and impossible in very hot or cold weather. The social current was taking the wealthy and cultured towards the elegant streets of Passeig de Gràcia and the burgeoning Eixample and the Palau Güell was stranded in a degenerating district.
  12. 12. After Güell’s death his daughter lived there until the building was confiscated in the Civil War and turned into a police station and jail. Later, after narrowly escaping being sold to an American millionaire and taken piecemeal to the United States, it was taken over by the Diputació de Barcelona who used it first as the headquarters of the Friends of Gaudí Society and the as a Theatre Museum
  13. 13. In 1984 it was declared a World Heritage site and since then has been intermittently under restoration and is now once more open to the public
  14. 14. Text: Internet Pictures: Joan Palau, Daniela Iacob & Internet Copyrights of the photos belong to each photographer Presentation: Sanda Foi oreanuş www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda Sound: Ramon Calduch - La puntaire

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