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Chromac	  Abstracon/	  Color	  Field	  
Mark	  Rothko	    (1903-­‐1970)	    Rothko’s	  style	  evolved	  over	  me	  Mark	  Rothko,	  An#gone,	  c.	  1941	  Naona...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  1947-­‐1949	  Rothko	  began	  series	  of	  mul-­‐form	  canvases	  Mark	  Rothko,	  Numb...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  1949	  “classic”	  style	  Canvases	  typically	  consist	  of	  soQ	  edged	  rectangles	...
Mark	  Rothko,	  Green	  and	  Maroon,	  1953	  Phillips	  Collecon	                                  Mark	  Rothko,	  Och...
Mark	  Rothko	  No.	  20	  1957	  Naonal	  Gallery	  of	  Australia	  
Mark	  Rothko	  White,	  Red,	  on	  Yellow	  1958	  Metropolitan	  Museum	  
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  Rothko’s	  method	  of	  working	  was	  different	  from	  the	  “acon	  painters”	       ...
Mark	  Rothko	        (1903-­‐1970)	        Thin	  washes	  of	  color	  Henri	  Masse,	  Red	  Studio,	  1911	  Museum	  ...
Mark	  Rothko	         (1903-­‐1970)	         Envisioned	  his	  pictures	  as	         “environments,”	  rather	  than	  ...
Mark	  Rothko	       (1903-­‐1970)	       Meditave	  environment;	       doorway	  to	  another	  reality	  “Rothko	  wrot...
"Small	  pictures	  since	  the	  Renaissance	  are	      like	  novels;	  large	  pictures	  are	  like	  dramas	      in...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  The	  “black	  form”	  painngs	  seem	  to	  look	  out	  into	  an	  expansive	  abyss	  ...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  The	  Romanc	  Sublime	  -­‐-­‐	  the	  sense	  of	  awe	  we	  experience	  when	  confro...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  Seagrams	  commission	  violated	  his	  ideas	  about	  the	  purpose	  of	  his	  painng...
Mark	  Rothko	  (1903-­‐1970)	  Rothko	  Chapel	  –	  realizaon	  of	  his	  dream	  of	  a	  “sacred	  art”	             ...
Mark	  Rothko	        (1903-­‐1970)	  “By	  the	  late	  50s	  Rothko	  was	  a	  very	  successful	  painter,	  and	  he	...
Mark	  Rothko	     (1903-­‐1970)	  “Meanwhile,	  he	  is	  chain-­‐smoking,	  drinking	  heavily,	  and	  abusing	  barbit...
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2.2 abex new2

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2.2 abex new2

  1. 1. Chromac  Abstracon/  Color  Field  
  2. 2. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)   Rothko’s  style  evolved  over  me  Mark  Rothko,  An#gone,  c.  1941  Naonal  Gallery  of  Art   Mark  Rothko,  Slow  Swirl  at  the  Edge  of  the  Sea,  1944   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  3. 3. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  1947-­‐1949  Rothko  began  series  of  mul-­‐form  canvases  Mark  Rothko,  Number  7,  1947  Guggenheim  Museum   Mark  Rothko,  Untled  (Mulform),  1948   Collecon  of  Kate  Rothko  Prizel  
  4. 4. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  1949  “classic”  style  Canvases  typically  consist  of  soQ  edged  rectangles  stacked  on  the  canvas   Mark  Rothko,  No.  3/No.  13,  1949   Museum  of  Modern  Art  
  5. 5. Mark  Rothko,  Green  and  Maroon,  1953  Phillips  Collecon   Mark  Rothko,  Ochre  and  Red  on  Red,  1954   Phillips  Collecon  
  6. 6. Mark  Rothko  No.  20  1957  Naonal  Gallery  of  Australia  
  7. 7. Mark  Rothko  White,  Red,  on  Yellow  1958  Metropolitan  Museum  
  8. 8. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  Rothko’s  method  of  working  was  different  from  the  “acon  painters”   Rothko  in  his  West  53rd  Street  studio,  painng  what   may  be  a  version  of  Un#tled,1952-­‐1953  (Guggenheim   Museum,  Bilbao),  photograph  by  Henry  Elkan,  c.  1953   Naonal  Gallery  of  Art  
  9. 9. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)   Thin  washes  of  color  Henri  Masse,  Red  Studio,  1911  Museum  of  Modern  Art   Rothko  in  his  West  53rd  Street  studio,  painng  what   may  be  a  version  of  Un#tled,1952-­‐1953  (Guggenheim   Museum,  Bilbao),  photograph  by  Henry  Elkan,  c.  1953   Naonal  Gallery  of  Art  
  10. 10. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)   Envisioned  his  pictures  as   “environments,”  rather  than   “pictures”  Viewer  looking  at  a  Mark  Rothko  painng  in  the  Naonal  Gallery  of  Art,  Washington  DC   Mark  Rothko,  1961  Image  source:     Image  source:    hbp://www.portlandart.net/archives/2009/07/the_rothko_brid.html  hbp://www.societyofcomposers.org/user/williamdougherty.html  
  11. 11. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)   Meditave  environment;   doorway  to  another  reality  “Rothko  wrote  that  the  great  arsc  achievements  of  the  past  were  pictures  of  the  human  figure  alone  in  a  moment  of  uber  immobility.  He  sought  to  create  his  own  version  of  this  solitary  meditave  experience,  scaling  his  pictures  so  that  the  viewer  is  enveloped  in  their  luminous,  atmospheric  surface.”  Tate  Gallery   A  woman  views  Mark  Rothkos  Orange,  Red,  Yellow,  1956  on  display  May  9,   2008  at  Sothebys  in  New  York   hbp://www.independent.co.uk/arts-­‐entertainment/art/features/mark-­‐ rothko-­‐sll-­‐hip-­‐to-­‐be-­‐square-­‐940133.html  
  12. 12. "Small  pictures  since  the  Renaissance  are   like  novels;  large  pictures  are  like  dramas   in  which  one  parcipates  in  a  direct  way."   Mark  Rothko  Image  source:    hbp://www.internaonalheralddailynews.org/world_arts1.htm  
  13. 13. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  The  “black  form”  painngs  seem  to  look  out  into  an  expansive  abyss   Mark  Rothko,  No.  7,  1964   Naonal  Gallery  of  Art  
  14. 14. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  The  Romanc  Sublime  -­‐-­‐  the  sense  of  awe  we  experience  when  confronted  with  the  boundlessness  of  nature   Caspar  David  Friedrich,  Monk  by  the  Seashore,  1809-­‐10   Staatliche  Museum,  Berlin    
  15. 15. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  Seagrams  commission  violated  his  ideas  about  the  purpose  of  his  painngs   Mark  Rothko’s  Seagrams  Murals,  as  installed  at  the  Tate  Gallery   MSNBC  
  16. 16. Mark  Rothko  (1903-­‐1970)  Rothko  Chapel  –  realizaon  of  his  dream  of  a  “sacred  art”   Rothko  Chapel,  Houston  Texas   Founded  by  John  and  Dominique  de  Menil  in  1971  as  an  inmate   sanctuary  available  to  people  of  every  belief   hbp://www.rothkochapel.org/  
  17. 17. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)  “By  the  late  50s  Rothko  was  a  very  successful  painter,  and  he  hated  it.  .  .  .  .  "I  have  imprisoned  the  most  uber  violence  in  every  inch  of  their  surface,"  he  claimed.  But  the  more  violence  Rothko  pumped  into  the  pictures,  the  more  plush  and  collecble  they  turned  out  to  be  .  .  .  Christopher  Benfey,  Slate.com   Image  source:    hbp://thisvignebe.com/  
  18. 18. Mark  Rothko   (1903-­‐1970)  “Meanwhile,  he  is  chain-­‐smoking,  drinking  heavily,  and  abusing  barbiturates  .  .  .  He  has  a  heart  aback  in  1968,  leaves  his  wife  in  1969,  and  on  Feb.  25,  1970,  slits  his  wrists  and  dies  on  the  studio  floor.”  Christopher  Benfey,  Slate.com   Mark  Rothko  in  his  West  53rd  Street  studio,  c.  1953,  photograph  by  Henry   Elkan,  courtesy  Archives  of  American  Art,  Smithsonian  Instuon;  Image   source:    hbp://www.nga.gov/feature/rothko/intro1.shtm  

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