New directions final120308

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  • 1,557,500 fires reported. (down 5%). These fires caused 3,430 civilian deaths, 17,675 civilian injuries, and $14.6 billion in property damage. A fire department responded to a fire every 20 seconds. One structure fire was reported every 59 seconds. One home structure fire was reported every 79 seconds One civilian fire injury was reported every 30 minutes. One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 33 minutes. One outside fire was reported every 41 seconds. One vehicle fire was reported every 122 seconds.
  • The total number of intentional and unintentional injury deaths was 173,753 in 2005. But deaths are only part of the picture – 30 million Americans suffer non-fatal injuries every year. In addition to the pain and suffering associated with injuries, there are financial consequences. Injuries cost the United States $406 billion annually.
  • Arm fire departments, first responders, and public educators with information and resources to develop and implement public education campaigns aimed at increasing knowledge about fire and life safety. Change public opinion that residential fires and injuries are "accidents" that can't be prevented and to teach the public what they can do to prevent fires and injuries .
  • 2006 survey: Home Safety Council & Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Who is doing FLSE? What is being done? How is it perceived in the department? What are barriers and facilitators? What are training needs?
  • 86% of the fire departments in the U.S. report conducting FLSE. Volunteer departments were less likely than career departments to provide FLSE (82% vs. 99%), but there was no difference between career and combination departments. Departments serving a large population (>10,000) were more likely to provide FLSE compared to those serving a smaller population (97% vs. 83%). There was no difference by region of the country. When asked who provides the FLSE, only 12% of fire departments had staff exclusively assigned to this responsibility; typically FLSE is provided by uniformed personnel who have multiple responsibilities (56%).
  • The most common FLSE activities …Few use specific curricula. Fire prevention, fire escape planning and smoke alarms were the focus of the vast majority of the FLSE activities (>70%). 51% reported distributing and/or installing smoke alarms, with conventional smoke alarm batteries being distributed/installed by 32% and 20% for lithium batteries. 52 % reported evaluating their FLSE activities. 46% report Advocacy “promoted fire related laws, ordinances, or regulations by testifying, presenting information to legislators, working with coalitions most often on the topic of smoke alarms (85%) and building or fire codes (62%). Far fewer responded that they conduct advocacy on the topics of sprinklers (30% for home and 36% for non-residential) or fire safe cigarettes (14%).
  • When asked how FLSE was positioned in the department, 40% reported that it was an important or critical part of the department activity. Second, when asked to rate their satisfaction with FLSE in their department, the average rating was 52 (0 being very dissatisfied and 100 being very satisfied). Career departments, those serving large populations, and those in the Southeast scored higher on both of these measures.
  • High priority barriers Lack of funding Lack of time (visit once a year) – difficult to offer consistent, reinforced messages Lack of focus (too many competing priorities) Lack of personnel, programs, training, and expertise Lack of knowledge about resources helpfulness of various facilitators to FLSE, the high priority responses included free community education materials, free safety products to distribute, and information about funding.
  • majority of respondents were interested in training (93%), although only 17% reported that they would be able to pay for training. Printed materials, videos, DVDs or CDs were recommended training formats, along with local in-person training opportunities.   Topics for training that were recommended included: programs for children, smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector programs, and FLSE skill building in advocacy, evaluation, and grant writing.
  • There is significant variation in the scope and potentially the impact of these activities. Not surprisingly, departments that serve smaller populations and volunteer departments, both of which have significantly smaller operating budgets than their larger and career counterparts, are less likely to have personnel assigned exclusively to FLSE activities and to conduct as wide an array of FLSE activities. It’s important to compare the types of activities undertaken to the types of fire- and burn-related injuries by region, which may help to explain why some regions conduct more juvenile fire setting programs or canvassing activities, for example. The clear message in both the survey responses and the written comments was that limited resources -- personnel and funding -- are substantial impediments to progress. At the same time, however, the value placed on the importance of prevention among fire departments is equally clear. This commitment and the strong interest in learning how to do more and better FLSE bode well for the future. DOES ANY OF THIS RING TRUE FOR YOU? WHAT ABOUT CHALLENGES FOR YOUR PUBLIC EDUCATION EFFORTS?
  • NFPA has a long history of working with public educators. we’ve worked closely with hundreds of public educators from across North America through our Champion, and Champion Management Team programs. 400 towns and cities (ranging from small rural communities to major urban centers) And over the years, we got a lot of feedback from our Champions. And one thing that we hear again and again is that one of their biggest challenges is getting into the classroom. Their traditional fire and life safety teaching methods – classroom visits and fire station visits – have become fewer and farther in between. They say it’s difficult to get into the classroom more than once a year. Frustrated that they can’t reinforce important safety lessons, and can’t teach in an interactive way because many times, their presentation is in front of a whole school, in an auditorium. They says it’s confusing, it’s difficult to be age-appropriate with their messages, and it’s become more of a “show” than a real learning experience. Also competition from other safety groups – Red Cross, D.A.R.E., etc. Why? Schools have less time, and are more focused on meeting standardized teaching requirements in core subject lessons like math, science and language arts – reading and writing.
  • It’s a fact that given this focus on the core subject areas, that public educators won’t get any more time in the classroom. Sister is a teacher – and she’s flat out with what she has to teach, no time for “extras” – life safety education. So we need to adapt, and make sure any fire safety educational resources that we are providing to the schools can be integrated into what the teachers are already being required to do. Every state department of education has set standards on what needs to be taught, so one strategy is to make sure all of the safety materials you’re providing to schools meets those standards. So instead of bringing material to your teachers that become “one more thing” they try to fit into their classroom schedule, your safety messages are easily integrated into classroom lessons Show teachers that using the lessons is not more work, but a way to deliver the curriculum in a fun way.
  • All lesson plans produced by NFPA – in programs like “Ready for RiskWatch” , and even our Fire Prevention Week classroom plans, have been correlated to the teaching standards in every state. i.e. language arts weave through all lessons, even math, where they may have to write an essay Important to use a variety of lessons, activities Helps teacher get away from core lessons, expand and enhance but still meet standards Our lesson plans were designed for classroom use, but we know that they’re also used by community groups, after school programs, girl and boy scouts, and others.
  • Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable What’s changed? As fire departments face dramatic budget cuts, purchasing FLSE materials is tough or impossible.
  • 2007, FEMA awarded $27 million in grants. Projects : fire prevention and public safety education campaigns, juvenile firesetter interventions, media campaigns, and arson prevention and awareness 2007 winners: universities, housing authorities, and city fire departments. Three organizations here in Colorado. Denver Firefighters Museum: $133,000……Elk Creek Fire Protection District in CONIFER: $77,000 Willow Ranch Volunteer FD in CALIFORNIA: $4,000 South Gulf County Volunteer FD in FLORIDA: $32,000 Grace Chapel Volunteer FD in NORTH CAROLINA: $70,000 Competition is tough – but $$ is there and you need to make a compelling case in your application. And FEMA offers online support documents that outline what you need to do to make your application stand out. FEMA/USFA has produced a free 161-page guide to funding options and implications. Ideas range from charging fees for traditional fire prevention services, charging for rescues where victims disobeyed public warnings (such as getting caught in a flash flood), and penalties for nuisance alarms. Guide offers detailed analysis of opportunities and benefits to these options. Raises lots of questions . Many communities may feel uneasy about charging for services beyond what traditional taxes cover – but others found it to be the only way to fund critical public safety services.
  • For those fire departments with few staff members, NFPA has found that developing a coalition to share expenses and expertise is the way to go. Normally, these community coalitions include: fire department police department or local law enforcement agency a health organization (hospital, health department, school nurse, or local SAFE KIDS a school administrator (principal or curriculum director) classroom teacher Consider expanding membership beyond these traditional disciplines. Rotary Club, Kiwanis, community groups, agencies or associations may be interested in participating and have valuable contributions to offer. For instance: sponsor a local classroom for $100 or an entire school for $2500. GRASSROOTS FUNDRAISING Through our work with public educators over the year, we’ve developed a fill-in-the-blank fundraising letter and some practical tips on how to ask for money in your community. Attached at end of your handouts. Also: encourage your public educators to do some research and reading.
  • We learned in that national survey of fire chiefs that one thing that public educators wanted was free teaching materials. Not an NFPA “commercial”, but just a heads-up about the many free things available on our site, that you and your team may not know about. Sparky.org Interactive games, monthly activities, stories, and electronic postcards. Lesson plans dozens for the classroom teacher for grades K-8, all correllated to state learning standards
  • What is FREE on NFPA’s Web site? Fact sheets Statistics, downloadable safety tip sheets, reproducible handouts on dozens of topics Fire Prevention Week June 1 through October 31 Campaign materials, “how-to” guides on fire department open houses, lesson plans, family activities
  • What is FREE on NFPA’s Web site? Do a search on NFPA.org
  • Over the past 18 months, we’ve developed FIVE toolkits specifically designed for public educators. Mailed to 32,000 fire departments and posted online. Each packet focused on a particular fire safety issue and contained a CD that included: Statistics and figures about the issue Tips on how to get your messages out to your community Fill-in-the-blank news releases letters to the editor printed public services announcements, and some video PSAs starring DAN DOOFUS
  • Traditional ways we communicate with our audiences aren’t going away, we need to start thinking about the new ways that the public wants to receive information. Growing trend toward electronic media – primarily internet-based, and less reliance on traditional media (i.e. newspaper and television). According to the Pew Research Center: Only 27% of Americans pick up a daily newspaper The number watching nightly news is declining More than one-third go online for news 55% of all adult Americans now have a high-speed internet connection at home Another issue to consider: we are becoming a society that’s bombarded with messages TV, newspaper, radio, e-mail, Web, cellphones, Ipods… Then add in Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, YouTube We’ve become a public that’s never disconnected…So our challenge is to break through the clutter – and make sure that the people who NEED our information, or SEEK OUT our information in this mess of messages, can find what they are looking for.
  • So while we can’t abandon our traditional ways of communicating, we need to be more aware of how our audiences want to receive information.
  • The challenge of these new communication technologies aren’t going way… And in a few minutes, we’re going to talk about how you might be able to incorporate some of these new tools in your public outreach efforts. But first – let’s talk about the Web. How many of you have a fire department Web site? How many have assigned one person to keep it updated? How many of you have a personal Web site? Next time you’re on the Web, going to all of your favorite sites, consider: what makes them your favorites? Just content? Ability to get work done, have fun, interact with others? Clear, concise writing? Navigation easy to understand? Updated regularly? There are a few basic rules about maintaining an effective Web site. Study and “borrow” ideas from sites you like, you make great changes to your site with little or no money or effort. Web is like a jigsaw puzzle. Dozens, maybe hundreds, maybe thousands of pieces of information, and it’s OUR job to put it all together in a way that makes sense, that is timely, usable, and useful . Even if you have THREE pages, it has to be logical and easy to use, or your audience may go elsewhere and never return. I mentioned a few simple rules…
  • They want/need information They want to make a purchase They want to be entertained They want to be part of a community T oo many organizations believe that a web site is about: telling your story to the world why you’re the best at what you do creating a new marketing tool getting donations And these are GREAT reasons to have a Web site…. And you might accomplish these things as a by-product of your site. But the #1 purpose of your site is to solve your customers’ problems. ASK: what is purpose of my site? ASK: Why might people visit a fire department web site? Is it truly based on what your visitors need ? Look at every page. What can audience expect to learn or accomplish. "What content do I have that would cause anybody to visit my site a second, third, or fourth time?
  • Here was a startling fact we recently learned…of the 100,000 visits we get a week to the NFPA website, only 1/3 come through the homepage. That means roughly 66,000 folks are getting dropped into the center of our site, and have to figure out who we are and what we do. Steve Krug talks about trying the “Trunk Test” Imagine that you’re blindfolded and locked in the trunk of a car and driven around for a while, and then suddenly dumped on a page deep inside your Web site. Your blindfold is ripped off and you’re asked…tell me what site you’re on, what page you’re on, what are the major sections of this site, what are your options, how do I get home? On every page, include your logo, usually in the top left corner. And LINK it back to your homepage Small Inobtrusive Legible Include tagline that summarizes what your site or company does. Be specific…
  • All web navigation must answer these questions: Where am I? Where have I been? –bread crumb trail, or indicating links you’ve already visited Where can I go next ? – what are my choices? Where’s the home page? - Link logo to homepage for those who want to start again.
  • Print and the Web are two different animals. People "read" print, but "scan" Web sites. Effective Web sites have information in bite-size “chunks” that are easy to scan and digest. General rule: Anything that's great print design is likely to be lousy Web design. On an effective Web page, with one quick look, a user can decide if this is the information that they’re looking for and make a decision to stay on that page or move on.
  • How most people read a newspaper or a book.
  • We’re thinking “great literature” reality: much closer to “billboard going by at 60 mph”. So if people are going to use your site like a giant billboard, design like a giant billboard Prominent headlines means something is important. Smaller type means something is not as important. The biggest image on your page means it’s the most important. Color that stands out means you want to capture your user’s attention.
  • Keep it short Online, it’s important to get to the point. What are you trying to say?
  • Keep it short It’s ironic: in print, you have certain limitations on how much copy can appear in a newsletter, on a brochure, or in a magazine. on the Web, there are no restrictions about how long a page is. But just because you have the capability to write long, descriptive passages, you have to fight that urge. Make it readable.
  • COPY from an NFPA report.
  • Chunk content into usable pieces… Use bold to make the important points stand out. Bullets to make it easy to scan , call out topic areas. Top ten lists, etc. And for those committed to READING like in a book or newspaper , we’ve included a downloadable one-page handout that they can print and take away.
  • Don’t make me guess! When posting content online, tell visitors where they’re going, what they can expect, and then go. Don’t surprise people and don’t make them guess. Chief Jones has written some memos on four different days. No information here. No idea what Chief is talking about, no reason for me to care, and no incentive to click through
  • Now we know about the topics that are covered – With one glance, I can decide if I’m interested. Add a way for users to interact with the Chief, to comment on one of his entries…or to reach him with a question. You’ may notice this a lot – some Web sites want you to GUESS what’s behind door #2… Read our newsletter President’s Message Important information
  • Your site can’t possibly be ultimate source for information on EVERY topic, -- but that’s the beauty of the Web. We can link anywhere and send our users out to the Web for more detailed information. Linking to other sites is best way to increase the findability of your site on search engines. TIP: the more sites you link to ... and the more sites that link back to you, will raise your profile on the search engines. TIP: If linking to an outside site, open the site in a new window. This way, users don’t get dumped off of your site.
  • Interesting tool that shows what other Web sites are linking to you… 2,630 to NFPA
  • Blogs RSS feeds Video/audio Podcasts Wikis Photo-sharing Social networking Not abandoning traditional methods of communication, but need to be in the game Social media is about ordinary people taking control of the world around them and finding creative ways to bring their voices together to get what they want. Do just a little bit of searching on the Web, you’re going to find conversations about NFPA. These conversations are happening and companies need to decide if they’re going to play or they’re going to ignore this technology. It is clear that we’ll never go back to the days when we get to completely control our messages through the channels that we select.
  • Communications strategy firm CONE: http://www.coneinc.com/content1182 Companies should: use social networks to solve their problems (43 percent). solicit feedback on their products and services (41 percent) via social media. develop new ways for consumers to interact with them (37 percent) through social media.
  • Well over 100 million blogs out there (News, personal, business, sports, etc.) And 550,000 blog posts every day. Blogs are more casual than many traditional business web sites, add a human element to the business atmosphere Blogs are fast and easy to update, require little technical skill Blogs are easy way to respond rapidly to a developing story What makes a blog a blog – ability for readers to interact, comment, and talk to author and others.
  • Blogs aren’t for everybody – they take care and feeding – can’t start and stop. Not a “PUSH” communications tool. But if you’re passionate about the topic, and someone who enjoys a conversation and seeks and encourages feedback this may be something you want to try.
  • RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a format for delivering regularly changing web content . Many news-related sites, weblogs and other online publishers syndicate their content as an RSS Feed to whoever wants it.   RSS solves a problem for people who regularly use the web. It allows you to easily stay informed by getting the latest content from the sites you are interested in. You save time by not needing to visit each site individually. NFPA currently offers seven different news feeds, a feed for each of our blogs, and a feed for each of our two monthly podcasts. We’ve got about 200 subscribers to the NFPA podcast, more than 100 for Fire Service today, and several dozen subscribers for each of our news feeds.
  • This is the OLD way of surfing the web: This is you and these are your favorite web sites. You log onto your computer and you’re looking for something new. Favorite blogs. Is there anything new there? Nope Favorite news sites. Anything new there? Nope. And every time you look for something new and it’s not there, you’ve wasted valuable time.
  • This is the new RSS way of surfing the web: Take the arrows and turn them the other way. Which means that the new content on your favorite blogs and your favorite news sites comes to you instead. So what RSS can do is set up a single home, where new content from all of your favorite web sites comes to you
  • Reading your feed: Need a home for reading all this content, called a “reader”. Free, all you need is an account. I use a site called Google Reader. All sites are listed on the left, and on the right are all the new posts that I’ve subscribed to. I see all of the content I want to read in a single place. Another way to organize your news feeds is built right into Internet Explorer. When you’re on a web site that you want to subscribe to, find the little orange symbol, click on it, and follow the simple instructions. Will add automatically to your FEEDS list…and to your Outlook account. More complicated than it sounds… BUILDING a FEED NFPA uses a program called FEED EDITOR – it cost $29 and uses a simple online Wizard that walks you through building the news items you want to offer up to subscribers. Really easy to use. RSS has been around for a while…but I don’t think many people take advantage of the technology…YET.
  • Gives NFPA the ability to spread and reinforce our messages wider than ever before In many cases, it’s easier to “show” than to “tell” Videos are interesting – look at the phenomenal success of YouTube. Helps NFPA put a face/personality to a story Tools in our arsenal Video camera/editing software YouTube (and other providers) – free hosting and tallying Allied Vaughn – outside hosting company Video camera and Flip video camera
  • Gives NFPA the ability to spread and reinforce our messages wider than ever before In many cases, it’s easier to “show” than to “tell” Videos are interesting – look at the phenomenal success of YouTube. Helps NFPA put a face/personality to a story Tools in our arsenal Video camera/editing software YouTube (and other providers) – free hosting and tallying Allied Vaughn – outside hosting company Video camera and Flip video camera
  • Gives NFPA the ability to spread and reinforce our messages wider than ever before In many cases, it’s easier to “show” than to “tell” Videos are interesting – look at the phenomenal success of YouTube. Helps NFPA put a face/personality to a story Tools in our arsenal Video camera/editing software YouTube (and other providers) – free hosting and tallying Allied Vaughn – outside hosting company Video camera and Flip video camera Used in-house as well.
  • So that’s a brief introduction to social media. It’s not as complicated as it sounds… and if I were to leave you with one piece of advice, it would be “ Try it, you’ll like it ” So much information, and guides on how and when to use social media, is available - for free – online. When in doubt, ask a kid! They know how to do it.
  • New directions final120308

    1. 1. Breaking Through The Clutter 2008 Colorado State Fire Chiefs Leadership Challenge Mike Hazell, NFPA Web Publisher
    2. 2. What we’ll cover <ul><li>What are the issues? </li></ul><ul><li>The state of fire and life safety education </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting our challenges </li></ul><ul><li>New ways to communicate </li></ul>
    3. 3. What are the issues? <ul><li>The fire problem </li></ul><ul><li>1,557,500 fires reported in 2007 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3,430 civilian deaths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>17,675 civilian injuries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$14.6 billion in property damage </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fire department responds to a fire every 20 seconds. </li></ul><ul><li>1 structure fire every 59 seconds. </li></ul><ul><li>1 home structure fire every 79 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>1 civilian fire injury every 30 minutes. </li></ul><ul><li>1 civilian fire death every 2.5 hours. </li></ul><ul><li>1 outside fire every 41 seconds. </li></ul><ul><li>1 vehicle fire every 122 seconds. </li></ul>
    4. 4. What are the issues? <ul><li>The injury problem* </li></ul><ul><li>173,753 injury deaths (2005) 30,000,000 non-fatal injuries (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Injuries cost the U.S. $406 billion annually. </li></ul>* Source: CDC
    5. 5. Our mission <ul><li>Arm fire departments with information and resources to develop and implement public education campaigns aimed at increasing knowledge about fire and life safety. </li></ul><ul><li>Change public opinion that residential fires and injuries are &quot;accidents&quot; that can't be prevented and to teach the public what they can do to prevent fires and injuries . </li></ul>
    6. 6. The State of Fire and Life Safety Education <ul><li>Home Safety Council & Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health </li></ul><ul><li>Who is doing FLSE? </li></ul><ul><li>What is being done? </li></ul><ul><li>How is it perceived in the department? </li></ul><ul><li>What are barriers and facilitators? </li></ul><ul><li>What are training needs? </li></ul>www.HomeSafetyCouncil.org > HSC Research
    7. 7. 1. Who is doing FLSE? <ul><li>82% of volunteer departments </li></ul><ul><li>99% of career/combination departments </li></ul><ul><li>Large departments more likely to provide FLSE. </li></ul><ul><li>12% of departments have staff exclusively assigned to FLSE. Typically provided by uniformed personnel who have multiple responsibilities. </li></ul>
    8. 8. 2. What is being done? <ul><li>80% elementary schools 69% fire safety week/month activities 40% older adults and health safety fairs 22% juvenile fire-setter presentations 19% neighborhood sweeps </li></ul><ul><li>70% focus on fire prevention, escape planning, smoke alarms </li></ul><ul><li>51% distribute and/or install smoke alarms </li></ul><ul><li>46% are involved with advocacy efforts </li></ul>
    9. 9. 3. How is it perceived in the department? <ul><li>40% say FLSE is an important or critical part of department activity. </li></ul><ul><li>When asked to rate their satisfaction with FLSE in their department, average rating was 52 . Career departments, those serving large populations, and those in the Southeast scored higher on both of these measures. </li></ul>
    10. 10. 4. What are barriers and facilitators? <ul><li>Barriers - Lack of funding - Lack of time - Lack of focus (too many competing priorities) - Lack of personnel, programs, training, and expertise - Lack of knowledge about resources </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitators - free community education materials - free safety products to distribute - information about funding </li></ul>
    11. 11. 5. What are training needs? <ul><li>93% interested in training; 17% say they can pay for it. </li></ul><ul><li>Printed materials, videos, DVDs or CDs, and in-person training were recommended formats.  </li></ul><ul><li>Topics: - programs for children - smoke alarm/CO detector programs - skill-building in advocacy, evaluation, and grant-writing </li></ul>
    12. 12. Survey comments <ul><li>“ Public education is as important in the fire service as fighting the fires.” </li></ul>
    13. 13. Survey comments <ul><li>“ Public education is as important in the fire service as fighting the fires.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Prevention should be at the top of our goals but always falls down the list due to funding.” </li></ul>
    14. 14. Survey comments <ul><li>“ Public education is as important in the fire service as fighting the fires.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Prevention should be at the top of our goals but always falls down the list due to funding.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I’m not real sure what FLSE is. I am sure we don’t have the money to spend on it.” </li></ul>
    15. 15. Survey comments <ul><li>“ Public education is as important in the fire service as fighting the fires.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Prevention should be at the top of our goals but always falls down the list due to funding.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I’m not real sure what FLSE is. I am sure we don’t have the money to spend on it.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Please don’t send anymore surveys! How about money?” </li></ul>
    16. 16. What does it all mean? <ul><li>FLSE among all fire departments is valued. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer and small departments less likely to have personnel assigned exclusively to FLSE, and to conduct a wide range of activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Limited resources -- personnel and funding -- are substantial impediments to progress. </li></ul>Fewer people, less money, high value, high expectations
    17. 17. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Access </li></ul><ul><li>What’s changed? Schools have less time; are focused on standardized testing requirements. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Access </li></ul>
    19. 20. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><li>What’s changed? As fire departments face dramatic budget cuts, purchasing FLSE materials is tough or impossible. </li></ul>
    20. 21. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FEMA’s Fire Prevention and Safety Grants $27 million in 2007 for fire prevention & safety programs, and firefighter safety research and development www.firegrantsupport.com/fps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Funding Alternatives for Fire and Emergency Services A free 161-page guide to options and implications http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa-141.pdf </li></ul>
    21. 22. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local coalitions Share expenses and expertise. Consider expanding beyond “the usual suspects” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Grassroots fundraising NFPA offers free tips and fill-in-the-blank funding letter </li></ul>Beverly A. Browning
    22. 23. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Free educational materials from NFPA Web sites </li></ul></ul>http://www.riskwatch.org/teach_lessonplan.html http://www.sparky.org
    23. 24. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Free educational materials from NFPA Web sites </li></ul></ul>http://www.firepreventionweek.org http://www.sparky.org http://www.nfpa.org/factsheets
    24. 25. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Free educational materials from NFPA Web sites </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Home escape grids </li></ul><ul><li>Smoke alarm installation guide </li></ul><ul><li>Annual research reports </li></ul><ul><li>For older adults </li></ul><ul><li>For people with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Easy-to-read materials </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly newsletter (“Safety Source”) </li></ul>
    25. 26. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Funding is scarce or unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Free educational materials from NFPA Web sites </li></ul></ul>Five tool kits mailed to all fire departments and available online. Nov. 2008 Sept. 2008 Mar. 2008 Nov. 2007 Apr. 2007 www.nfpa.org/toolkits
    26. 27. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Changing ways primary audiences are accessing information </li></ul>
    27. 28. Facing our challenges <ul><li>Challenge: Changing ways primary audiences are accessing information </li></ul>Get on board the electronic information freight train or get run over by it!
    28. 29. Facing our challenges
    29. 32. Rule #1: Have a purpose <ul><li>A horrible truth: Nobody cares about you or your Web site! </li></ul><ul><li>They want/need information </li></ul><ul><li>They want to make a purchase </li></ul><ul><li>They want to be entertained </li></ul><ul><li>They want to be part of a community - Vincent Flanders ( www.webpagesthatsuck.com ) </li></ul>
    30. 33. Rule #2: Make it easy <ul><li>Who are you? What do you offer? </li></ul>
    31. 34. Rule #2: Make it easy <ul><li>Make it easy to get around. </li></ul><ul><li>Where am I? </li></ul><ul><li>Where have I been? </li></ul><ul><li>Where can I go next? </li></ul>
    32. 35. Rule #2: Make it easy Source: Jacob Nielsen’s Web site www.useit.com
    33. 36. Rule #3: Write for the Web <ul><li>Print and Web are different </li></ul><ul><li>Print: READ </li></ul><ul><li>Web: SCAN . </li></ul>
    34. 37. Rule #3: Write for the Web
    35. 38. Rule #3: Write for the Web
    36. 39. Rule #4: Keep it short <ul><li>Omit extra words that get in the way of your visitors getting to the information they want. </li></ul>
    37. 40. Rule #4: Keep it short <ul><li>Omit extra words that get in the way of your visitors getting to the information they want. </li></ul>
    38. 41. Rule #5: Chunk your copy
    39. 42. Rule #5: Chunk your copy
    40. 43. Rule #6: “Don’t make me guess!” <ul><li>Memos from Chief Robert Jones </li></ul><ul><li>April 1, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>April 8, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>April 15, 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>April 22, 2008 </li></ul>
    41. 44. Rule #6: “Don’t make me guess!” <ul><li>Memos from Chief Robert Jones </li></ul><ul><li>Dorm fire safety (4/1/08) </li></ul><ul><li>Home fire drills (4/8/08) </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent cooking fires (4/15/08) </li></ul><ul><li>Get ready for grilling (4/22/08) Send an e-mail to Chief Jones </li></ul>
    42. 45. Rule #7: Link, link, link
    43. 46. Rule #7: Link, link, link <ul><li>Find out who links to you… </li></ul>link:http://www. yourwebsiteurl i.e. link:http://www.cnn.com
    44. 50. Web 2.0 (Social Media) <ul><li>Using electronic/Internet tools to share and discuss information and experiences with others to create value for the user </li></ul>
    45. 51. Social Media <ul><li>Survey: Americans expect social media (September ‘08) </li></ul><ul><li>93% of online Americans say companies should have a social media presence </li></ul><ul><li>85% believe companies should be interacting with consumers through social media </li></ul>
    46. 52. Blogs <ul><li>Blog = “Web log” </li></ul><ul><li>A simple Web-publishing tool that allows writers to post entries (text, images, graphics, audio, video, links). i.e. The Huffington Post, Lifehacker, Google Blog </li></ul><ul><li>Less formal writing </li></ul><ul><li>Can feature multiple voices </li></ul><ul><li>Content is short, doesn’t need to be as “developed” </li></ul><ul><li>Point to related content (and these sites point back to you) </li></ul><ul><li>* Encourage feedback, interactive and community building </li></ul>
    47. 53. Blogs Launched: April 2006 Visits: 61,848 Comments: 271 http://nfpa.typepad.com/fireservicetoday/
    48. 54. Blogs Colchester, CT Watertown, MA Los Angeles, CA Sun Valley, ID
    49. 55. RSS <ul><li>RSS = “Really Simple Syndication” </li></ul><ul><li>A format for delivering regularly changing Web content for people who subscribe. </li></ul>
    50. 56. RSS The “old” way of surfing the Web
    51. 57. RSS The “ RSS ” way of surfing the Web
    52. 58. RSS www.google.com/reader Reading RSS feeds Building RSS feeds NFPA users “Feed Editor”, but many to choose from.
    53. 59. Audio and Podcasts Audio: digital file ( .wav, mp3, etc.) accessed via links on your Web site, using some kind of media player (iTunes, Quicktime, WMP, etc.)
    54. 60. Audio and Podcasts <ul><li>Institutional knowledge – “hear from experts” </li></ul><ul><li>New way of providing content </li></ul><ul><li>Complements other online content </li></ul><ul><li>Digital audio recorders are cheap and easy to use. </li></ul><ul><li>NFPA uses “Audacity” to edit audio clips. </li></ul><ul><li>Can be loaded onto Web site like any other file. </li></ul>
    55. 61. Audio and Podcasts
    56. 62. Audio and Podcasts Podcast: a series of digital files (.wav, mp3, etc.) accessed via links on your Web site, using some kind of media player (iTunes, Quicktime, WMP, etc.) A podcast is syndicated ( ) and tends to be longer form. This American Life, Real Time Bill Maher, 60 Minutes NFPA issues two monthly podcasts.
    57. 63. Video “ A picture tells 1,000 words. A moving picture tells 10,000”
    58. 64. Video <ul><li>Tell your story on a global scale . </li></ul><ul><li>related videos </li></ul><ul><li>comments, video responses, subscriptions, and easy tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Video recorders (“Flip”) are cheap, easy to use, and come with editing software. </li></ul><ul><li>Loading to YouTube is free. </li></ul>
    59. 65. Video
    60. 66. Video <ul><li>NFPA’s most watched video on YouTube: </li></ul><ul><li>Posted 12/07 </li></ul><ul><li>42,755 views </li></ul><ul><li>38 comments </li></ul>
    61. 68. Contact me

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