Teaching in medieval times

4,659 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,659
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
257
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Teaching in medieval times

  1. 1. The teaching in medieval times Education
  2. 2. In the begin of Middle Ages around  450 DC• The main subjects  were Christian ones, and the  Aristotle’s rhetoric was important.• Aristotle’s rhetoric is the use of language with  persuasive effect.• Saint Augustine:  – taught in the Latin grammar school at Tagaste – opened a school of rhetoric at Carthage – taught rhetoric in Rome – accepted a professorship in rhetoric at Milan
  3. 3. Saint Augustine Saint Augustine and his  mother Saint Monique
  4. 4. Aristotle’s rhetoric (1)• The base of rhetoric was three persuasive  audience appeals : – logos, pathos and ethos• And five canons: – invention or discovery, arrangement, style,  memory, and delivery
  5. 5. three persuasive audience appeals• Logos – In the old Greece the word meant word, speech,   reason – For Aristotle the term to meant reasoned discourse• Further Jesus saw as the incarnation of the Logos• Pathos – represented an appeal to the audiences emotions• Ethos – involved moral competence only; But Aristotle  broadens the concept to include expertise and  knowledge
  6. 6. The five canons• Inventio – was the method used for the discovery of arguments• Dispositio – the system were used for the organization of arguments• Elocutio  – the term used for the mastery of stylistic elements concern the  crafting and delivery of speeches and writing – four ingredients necessary in order to achieve good style included  correctness, clearness, appropriateness, and ornament• Memoria – was the same meaning as today• Pronuntiatio – the content, structure, and style of oration .The most important elements of oratory enhancing its persuasive power
  7. 7. Making a book in medieval times• As paper, in Europe, did not become common  until around 1450 the most medieval  manuscripts were written on treated animal  skins called parchment.• The parchment was ruled colored ink, lines  that helped the scribe to write
  8. 8. Medieval people• Few books, few ideas, many people could not  read, religiosity was predominant with many  wars
  9. 9. Medieval people and medieval  buildingsGiordano Bruno
  10. 10. At the end around 1400 DC• The word universitas originally was applied to  the scholastic guild• A guilt was a corporation of students and  masters: – A community of teachers and scholars whose  corporate existence had been recognized and  by  the ecclesiastical authority
  11. 11. Scholasticism• Has its origins in Charlemagne, who attracted  the scholars of England and Ireland,   established schools in every abbey in his  empire which arise the name scholasticism• The word as two meanings – a method of learning taught by scholastics – A program that articulates and defends orthodoxy  in an increasingly pluralistic context
  12. 12. The method of learning• As a method of learning it has his bases• Dialectic: – a dialogue between two or more people who may hold  differing views – applying reason the people exchange their viewpoints to  seek the truth • Inference: – achieving a conclusion by deductive reasoning from given  facts• Resolving Contradictions.  – a contradiction is a logical incompatibility between two or  more propositions
  13. 13. Magister dixit• This sentence used in Florence and all Italy,  around 1600 by the teachers to shut up all the  students who contested the Aristotles  astronomy theory.
  14. 14. Aristotle astronomy• Aristotle argued that the universe is spherical  and finite with the Earth in the center.• Aristotles model of the universe had a  profound influence on medieval scholars, but  nevertheless they modified it to correspond  with Christian theology. 
  15. 15. The limitations of technology• Medieval books were hand written and rare.• Few books means the reading were limited to  a few people. But they were very nice  with nice pictures
  16. 16. There were no tools and no  science• Without the right tools there is no  science: magister dixit was enough
  17. 17. Bibliografia• http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/agexed/aee501/augustine.html• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contradictions• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialectical_reasoning• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispositio• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elocutio• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethos• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inference• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inventio• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logos• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memoria• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_university• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathos• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pronuntiatio• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhetoric• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholasticism• http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/making/• http://perseus.mpiwg‐berlin.mpg.de/GreekScience/Students/Tom/AristotleAstro.html• http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magister_dixit

×