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Jbpm concept presentation summer2014

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Jbpm concept presentation summer2014

  1. 1. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT SUMMER 2014
  2. 2. The Historic Portland Public Market Foundation dba James Beard Public Market 501(c)3, Tax EIN: 26-0070100 222 SW Washington St. Portland, OR 97204 (503) 208 2071 info@jamesbeardmarket.com www.jamesbeardmarket.com Board of Trustees Richard Harris, President Wendy Lane Stevens, Vice President Janie Hibler, Secretary Andrew Franklin, Treasurer Pippa Arend Jim Bean Pietro Ferrari Amelia Hard Greg Higgins Lynn Loacker Martin McClanan Gary Roth Dan Saltzman Lisa Sedlar Johanna Thoresz Standing Committees Board Nominating, Wendy Lane Stevens Chair Building, Richard Harris Chair Community Advisory Team, Pietro Ferrari Chair Events, Amelia Hard Chair Finance, Andrew Franklin Chair Staff Ron Paul, Executive Director Lori Warner-McGee, Development Director Ann Forsthoefel, Outreach and Operations Director Jennifer Mannhard, Project and Office Manager
  3. 3. To Market What is it that makes this place so remarkable? What defines our food and cooking—climate, soil, people or culture? After three decades reveling in the seasonal bounty of this place we call Oregon—whether while gardening, cooking or eating— it’s clear to me that we are very fortunate to reside here. The region we inhabit has few peers when it comes to its diverse harvests from our lands and waters. The quality of these ingredients has nourished a flourishing food culture on all levels from small farms to ranchers, food artisans, winemakers, brewers, cheese makers—the list is seemingly endless. The result of all of this spontaneous ferment is a food scene that is adored and envied nationwide. Where to now? To market! All of the world’s food capitals have a feature in common—a grand permanent market to proudly showcase their culinary abundance. Vienna’s Naschmarkt, Borough Market in London, Nishiki- dori in Kyoto: these places are their city’s pantries and are gathering places for locals and tourists alike. Portland’s food scene has come of age and the time has come for us to open our kitchen cupboards to all. The James Beard Public Market will provide a venue to shop, learn, eat, and most importantly, embrace and preserve our state’s grand agricultural heritage. Whether as farmer, shopper, chef, teacher, tourist or student, there’ll be great things for all at the market....... –Greg Higgins, gardener & chef “All of the world’s food capitals have a feature in common—a grand permanent market to proudly showcase their culinary abundance.”
  4. 4. MARKET TOWNAgricultural and culinary heritage Why James Beard? James Beard was a famous chef and writer and Portland native who as helped start the movement for fresh local food in the United States. Shopping with his mother at Portland’s public markets gave him an early appreciation for Oregon’s culinary riches.
  5. 5. In Portland, a Golden Age of Dining and Drinking Excerpt from the NY Times ...At first [Portland] was a sort of underground stop for food and wine lovers who had heard word of small, fascinating restaurants run by young, talented chefs serving a bounty of local produce. It’s underground no more. Portland has emerged from its chrysalis as a full-fledged dining destination. This is a golden age of dining and drinking in a city that 15 years ago was about as cutting edge as a tomato in January. Every little neighborhood in this city of funky neighborhoods now seems to be exploding with restaurants, food shops and markets, all benefiting from a critical mass of passion, skill and experience, and all constructed according to the gospel of locally grown ingredients. In close proximity is a cadre of farmers committed to growing environmentally responsible produce with maximum flavor, delivered to restaurants and to the gorgeous farmers’ markets that dot the city. There are local fisheries and small beef, lamb and pork producers. Not far away is the Hood River Valley, with its myriad fruit growers who supply glistening, fragile berries and stonefruits of every stripe and color. World-class wine is produced in the Willamette Valley, the center of the Oregon wine industry, just a half hour’s drive away. Portland has six micro-distilleries making any kind of spirits you can name and, if you’d like a chaser, more breweries than any other city on earth. Just as important is a receptive populace, demanding yet eager to be wowed. By ERIC ASIMOV Published: September 26, 2007 Michael Rubenstein for The New York TimesLe Pigeon at prime time. “In close proximity is a cadre of farmers committed to growing environmentally responsible produce with maximum flavor.” “Portland has emerged from its chrysalis as a full-fledged dining destination.”
  6. 6. Morrison BMARKET SITEMorrison Bridge Head
  7. 7. “Highlight the Willamette River as the Central City’s defining feature by framing it with a well-designed built environment, celebrating views to the larger surrounding landscape, improving east-west access and orientation and encouraging a range of river-supportive uses.” – City of Portland, Central City 2035 Concept Plan, Goal K, October 2012 “Having a year round Public Market would allow Portland to showcase its local food production as well as continue to be a leader in regional promotion of foods and their products. The Morrison Bridge Space is an ideal location for such an operation. It is highly visible to Oregonians and visitors to Portland…and is a natural gateway to downtown Portland. The space would provide new opportunities for local producers of farm products, as well as bring energy to an underutilized section of town.” - Food Innovation Center “It [the Morrison Bridge] is highly visible to Oregonians and visitors to Portland…and is a natural gateway to downtown Portland.” “Highlight the Willamette River as the Central City’s defining feature by framing it with a well- designed built environment.”
  8. 8. MARKET SITEMorrison Bridge Head Morrison Bridge SW Naito Parkway Tom McCall Waterfront Park Market Site SW Naito Parkway Market Site Tower Site SW 1st Ave/MAX SW 2nd Ave
  9. 9. MELVIN MARK COMPANIES 28 Safe Pedestrian Access The Morrison Bridgehead site, with its easy access to bus and light rail service as well as approximately 1,200 public and private short-term parking spaces within blocks, is an ideal site for the Public Market. The County’s recent improvements to the pedestrian and bicycle accessibility on the bridge ramps makes the approach to the Public Market safe for people coming from both downtown and the eastside. Printing Press Park on First Avenue will be enhanced by new pedestrian activity through the area, and will add to a rich and dynamic pedestrian experience. Enhancing Site Opportunities This multi-purpose site has two distinctively different anchor development opportunities. Blocks 1, 2 and 39 represent a rare opportunity in Portland’s Central Business District with three contiguous blocks under single ownership currently developed with surface parking. Development constraints are equally unique given the impact of the Morrison Bridge ramps and the requirement to maintain access for ongoing mainte- nance and potential future replacements. The Public Market is the ideal anchor development for this portion of the site. The infrastructure and support needed for the market will require minimal disturbance to the subsurface and elevated bridge structures. The Public Market will activate the site seven days SALMON SPRINGS FOUNTAIN DOWNTOWN RETAIL DISTRICT “OLD TOWN” DISTRICT LLOYD DISTRICT SATURDAY MARKET PUBLIC MARKET CENTRALEASTSIDE ESPLANADELOOP The Public Market will become the hub and connector to the surrounding cultural, social and economic districts. The Public Market will become the hub and connector to the surrounding cultural, social, and economic districts. South Market Hall Site SW Naito Parkway Morrison Bridge Tom McCall Waterfront Park North Market Hall Site Morrison Bridge Ramp to Naito Pkwy North Site
  10. 10. Morrison BridgehMARKET PROGRAMStreet Level studiojeffreys + KASA Architects Plaza M 1 Sto 3,3 ! Ground 45,100 sqft Second 35,000 sqft Basement 12,900 sqft Total 93,000 sqft South Market Hall Ground floor 22,750 gross sf 60 Stall Modules 9,700 net sf SW Naito Parkway Tom McCall Waterfront Park SW 1st Ave/MAX SW 2nd Ave North Market Hall South Market Hall Storage Storage Bridge supports for Morrison Bridge above Plaza & Mobile Vendor Stalls New Tower Project Existing Office Tower SWStarkSt
  11. 11. studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 4 Mathallen Oslo case study MARKET PROGRAMExamples from Mathallen, Oslo Mobile vendors in Brugge, Belgium
  12. 12. Morrison BridgeheMezzanine Level MARKET PROGRAM studiojeffreys + KASA Architects LoPlaza Market 18,875 g Storage 3,324 gsf ! Ground 45,100 sqft Second 35,000 sqft Basement 12,900 sqft Total 93,000 sqft South Market Hall Ground floor 22,750 gross sf 60 Stall Modules 9,700 net sf SW Naito Parkway Tom McCall Waterfront Park SW 1st Ave/MAX SW 2nd Ave Restaurant Storage Plaza & Mobile Vendor Stalls (below bridge) New Tower Project Existing Office Tower SWStarkSt Storage Partner Offices Demo Kitchen & Event Space Market Offices
  13. 13. studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 7 Mathallen Oslo case study Mathallen Oslo studiojeffreys + KASA Architects James Beard Public Market • Two iconic market halls • 100-120 vendor stalls • 350 green jobs • Teaching kitchen • Event venue • Sustainable deliveries • Local economic growth MARKET PROGRAMExamples from Mathallen, Oslo
  14. 14. studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 19 Outdoor Storage Outdoor Storage LobbyPlaza Recycle Stalls Recycle Lobby Naito Parkway Stalls North Market Hall Ground floor 22,350 gross sf 60 Stall Modules 9,500 net sf Market Hall 18,875 gsf Storage 3,324 gsf Market Hall 18,450 gsf Storage 3,300 gsf ! Ground 45,100 sqft Second 35,000 sqft Basement 12,900 sqft Total 93,000 sqft South Market Hall Ground floor 22,750 gross sf 60 Stall Modules 9,700 net sf Ground Floor Concept CONCEPTUAL LAYOUT
  15. 15. studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 20 Cafe / Exhibitions bridge 1,300 gsf m Open to below Mercantile 5,750 gsf ! Event/Function space 4,660 gsf 200-seats Demo kitchen Chair/table storage Vendor break room 1,100 gsf Catering Kitchen 1,050 gsfw ! Business Center m w Pre-Function bridge Restaurant 2,650 gsf Kitchen 980 gsf 3,700 gsf South Market Hall Second floor 17,700 gross sf North Market Hall Second floor 17,300 gross sf ! Ground 45,100 sqft Second 35,000 sqft Basement 12,900 sqft Total 93,000 sqft Market Admin Offices Open to below Views to park & river Views to First AveViews to First Ave Views to park & river Cafe / Exhibitions bridge 1,300 gsf BalconyPre-Function bridge Private Dining Naito Parkway Second Floor Concept CONCEPTUAL LAYOUT
  16. 16. INSPIRATIONGlobal Precedents studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 3 Mathallen Oslo case studystudiojeffreys + KASA Architects 6 Mathallen Oslo case study Mathallen, Oslo
  17. 17. 3 Mathallen Oslo case study Mathallen, Oslo
  18. 18. studiojeffreys + KASA Architects 9 Torvehallerne Copenhagen Case study 8 Torvehallerne Copenhagen Case study studiojeffreys + KASA Architects INSPIRATIONGlobal Precedents Torvehallerne, Copenhagen
  19. 19. Torvehallerne, Copenhagen 9 Torvehallerne Copenhagen Case study
  20. 20. INSPIRATIONGlobal Precedents Granville Island, Vancouver BC
  21. 21. Granville Island, Vancouver BC
  22. 22. INSPIRATIONGlobal Precedents Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  23. 23. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  24. 24. Living in Oregon for almost 50 years has given me a deep sense of place and an appreciation of our rich seasonal bounty. The abundance of u-pick farms and the availability of wild game, fish and berries, has formed a strong bond between the land and the community that’s shaped our current food culture. Over the years I’ve enjoyed traveling overseas and exploring other culinary areas, but it has made me realize Oregon is the exception and not the rule—it is truly one of the greatest culinary regions in the world. With the fertile Willamette Valley right in our own back yard, the fast turn-around time from the field to the kitchen is the dream of any cook. A year-round indoor public market will be a showcase for Oregon’s culinary products, where cooks can shop, children can learn about healthy cooking and sustainable food ways, and family and friends can join together in the celebration of food. –Janie Hibler, James Beard Public Market Board Parking Lot Public Market Help transform three parking lots into the heart and soul of our region’s food economy! Wroclaw, Silesia, Poland
  25. 25. Grand Opening Spring 2018 VISION TO REALITY The mission of the James Beard Public Market is to operate a daily, year-round, indoor-outdoor venue to showcase our region’s bounty, to promote sustainable agricultural practices, to encourage healthy eating, and to provide entrepreneurial opportunities for those who produce and sell the food we eat. 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Concept Development Community Outreach Building Design Construction Budgeting Grand Opening Fundraising First to Market! Portland, after leading North America in the quality and quantity of its public markets, is ready again for a permanent, year-round, indoor/ outdoor market that captures the essence of our culinary heritage and culture. An ever- increasing number of citizens from all walks of life have rallied in support of the Market’s mission and we want to sincerely thank them for their early commitment. But they alone cannot will the Market into existence. This community effort requires you, your friends, neighbors and colleagues to help Portland realize its unique culinary and agricultural status while reconnecting to the city’s rich history of public markets. Make a tax-deductible, secure donation online at jamesbeardmarket.com or contact us at info@jamesbeardmarket.com. You’ll create a public gathering place for people from different ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic communities coming together for the common experiences of savoring great food, music and conversation. Your investment will create a true public market that will increase access to fresh, healthy food, play a key role in promoting public health goals, and stimulate the economy for local businesses and residents. Whether as farmer, shopper, chef, teacher, tourist or student there will be great things for you at the market. Thank you for your gift, for helping the community reap the benefits of a permanent public market on Portland’s waterfront, and for your understanding that healthy food grown in a sustainable manner is a fundamental right for all of our citizens. Fall 2015 Fall 2014 Fall 2016 Spring 2018

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