Renaissance painting

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New version of Renaissance revision but divided into sections and with images

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Renaissance painting

  1. 1. Renaissance Painting Revision
  2. 2. Renaissance Painting • Naturalism: – people must be represented as they are – observation is essential • Rationalism: – Things are represented following the reason – Use of perspective and backgrounds • Universalism: – Subjects general for any culture – Related to human beings
  3. 3. Renaissance Painting • Idealisation: – Characters are idealised – They do not have deformations • Order, proportion and harmony: – Things transmit calm and serenity • Perfection: – Works perfectly finished – Attention to the small detail
  4. 4. Renaissance Painting • Supports – Wall painting was frequent in Italy; mosaic left way to mural painting in Venice – Even if the canvas advanced, wood was of frequent use – Poliptics were common in Spain and Northern Europe whereas in Italy they used an only panel.
  5. 5. Renaissance Painting • Techniques: – In Italy the fresco continued – Book illumination lost importance with the printed books – Engraving on wood and on copper developed – Drawing became more important – Temple was replaced by oil systematically
  6. 6. Renaissance Painting • Gaiak: • Themes: – Religious continued being important, mainly in Northern Europe and Spain. – In Italy mythology was more important – Portrait developed – Landscape, without being independent, acquired more importance in the paintings
  7. 7. Renaissance Painting • Composition: – Space was rationalised with the resource to lineal and atmospheric perspective – The organization of the painting put more attention in the centre than in the periphery – Sometimes the shapes are organised following simple shapes. – The background used traditional motives or architectures of Roman inspiration.
  8. 8. Renaissance Painting • Drawing, colour and brushstroke: – Gold disappeared, the same as light colours in the strategic areas of the painting – Palette diversified, being commonly light – Oil painting permitted the use of delicate nuances (transparencies, luminosity) – Triumph of the sfumato.
  9. 9. Mannerism Painting • Images: – Faces are full of a new realism – Bodies must be convinced by the imitation of real forms. – Worry for idealization, especially in nudes, using canons of beauty – The normalisation of beauty led to the apparition of their antagonists, with grotesque or caricaturized images.
  10. 10. Mannerism Painting • Technique and support: – Are the same as those of the Renaissance – Format of paintings: • Big in churches and palaces • Small for stamps • Themes: – Religious were frequent – Mythology and allegory depiction improved – Portrait developed more
  11. 11. Mannerism Painting • Composition, drawing, colour and brushstrokes: – – – – Everything tried to create surprise Compositions are not centred Colours are not common Images are numerous • Images: – They try to surprise – Deformations and complicated lines
  12. 12. Renaissance painters • Massacio: – – – – – Material characters with power and dignity Perfection of detail Sense of tactile values He painted frescoes Works: Brancaci Chapel
  13. 13. Renaissance painters
  14. 14. Renaissance painters • Ucello: – Famous for his paintings that remain medieval period – Interested in perspective – Figures appeared solid and real – He did not know how to use light and shade – Preocupation with applied geometry – Works: San Romano’s Battle
  15. 15. Renaissance painters
  16. 16. Renaissance painters • Filippo Lippi: – – – – – – Author of crowded fresco scenes Madonnas and saints holy, serene His works were more naturalistic with the time. He used tempera. Work of precision, depth and fluidity Works: Madonna
  17. 17. Renaissance painters
  18. 18. Renaissance painters • Fra Angelico: – He used a simple style, sacrificing perspective to it. – He produced many frescoes – His works are elegant and delicate – Works: Annunciation, frescoes at San Marco’s convent.
  19. 19. Renaissance painters
  20. 20. Renaissance painters • Piero della Francesca – Perspective and geometry are dominant in his works – He liked to organise large, plain masses of colour in patters which suggest and underlyin geometrical scheme – Light palette – Large areas of white or near-white – Works: The Baptism of Christ, The Nativity.
  21. 21. Renaissance painters
  22. 22. Renaissance painters • Botticelli – Individual and graceful style – Pure visual poetry – Denial of rational spatial construction and no attempt to model solid-looking figures – Figures float on the forward plane, agains a decorative landscape – Form outlined – Personal type of femenine beauty – Works: The Spring, The Birth of Venus
  23. 23. Renaissance painters
  24. 24. Renaissance painters • Mantegna – – – – Mastery of perspective Adapt the scene to low viewpoint Scorzo Works: Death Christ • Bellini – Famous for his portraits – Large-scale narrative paintings – Works: Portrait of the Dux
  25. 25. Renaissance painters
  26. 26. Renaissance painters • Leonardo – Delicate treatment of the characters portrayed – Lack of rigidity in the contours – Sfumato or special way of changing colours, covering them with shadows – Direct gazes of enigmatic meaning – Variety of techniques not always successful – Works: Mona Lisa, The Virgin of the Rocks, Saint John
  27. 27. Renaissance painters
  28. 28. Renaissance painters • Raphael – Clear organization of the composition – Avoidance of excessive detail – Expansive style of composition which presented itself as a homogeneous and easily intellegible whole – Painting was no longer to be a portrayal of an event but an interpretation of its subject-matter – He adopted the innovations of Leonardo and Michelangelo – Works: The Athens School, Madonna Sixtina, The Weddings of the Virgin.
  29. 29. Renaissance painters
  30. 30. Renaissance painters • Michelangelo – His characters are depicted in an sculptoric way, with an important entity – Images are full of movement – Characteristic terribilitá – Richness of colours, light in general – Works: Ceiling of the Sixtine Chapel, Panel of the Last Judgement, Tondo Doni
  31. 31. Renaissance painters
  32. 32. Renaissance painters • Giorgione – The landscape is more that just the background – Images depicted without detail – Work: The Tempest
  33. 33. Renaissance painters • Titian – History paintings – Portraits with high level of felicity – Works: Charles V at Mülbherg, Baccanal
  34. 34. Renaissance painters • Veronese – – – – Regular volumes Strong colours and great contrasts Conventionalised figures Works: marriage at Cana
  35. 35. Renaissance painters • Dürer – The greatest artist of Northern Renaissance – First author who painted self-portraits – Woodcuts and engravings – Author of magnificent altarpieces and powerful portraits – Diversity of subjects in his watercolours – Works: Adan and Eve, Self-portrait
  36. 36. Renaissance painters
  37. 37. Renaissance painters • Grünewald • Grünewald – Religious paintings of visionary expressiveness – Intense colours and agitated lines – Work: The Isenheim Altarpiece • Holbeing the Younger – – – – Excellent portratist Portraits do not reveal the personality Taste for illusionist effects Works: Henry VIII , The Ambassadors • Cranach the Elder – Portraits and female nudes – Works: Luther, Duke Henry of Saxony
  38. 38. Renaissance painters
  39. 39. Renaissance painters • Yañez de la Almedina – Introduced the High Renaissance in Spain • Masip – Combined Italian and Netherlandish influences • Juan de Juanes – Ideal Counter-Reformation images – Influences of Leonardo and Raphael – Sfumato effects
  40. 40. Renaissance painters
  41. 41. Mannerism painters • Corregio – Conscious elegance, soft sfumato and gestures of captivating charm – Sensuous mythologies, as his Venuses • Tintoretto – Figures full of heath – Effects of light and shadow – Colossal conception of the human but with elegance
  42. 42. Mannerism painters
  43. 43. Mannerism painters • Morales – Devotional images influenced by Leonardo • Sanchez Coello – Pioneer of the Spanish portrait painting – Ease of pose and execution, dignity and sobriety and warmth of colouring
  44. 44. Mannerism painters
  45. 45. Mannerism painters • El Greco – Influenced by the mysticism of CounterReformation – Elongated figures – Intense and unusual colour – Ardour and energy
  46. 46. Mannerism painters

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