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Hands on Measurement for K-2 Learners

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Activities and strategies to teach K-2 learners measurement concepts.

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Hands on Measurement for K-2 Learners

  1. 1. Hands On Measurement April 5, 2007 By Michelle Flaming
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Measurement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Opening Activity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities from my Hands on Measurement Book </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Integrating with Science - Bentley Richert </li></ul><ul><li>NCTM Research/Student Interviews </li></ul>
  3. 3. Linear to Data <ul><li>Draw a line on a piece of paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Measure your line to the nearest cm. </li></ul><ul><li>Label your line. ____ cm </li></ul><ul><li>Line up from the shortest to longest line. </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher “posts” the papers. </li></ul><ul><li>Using the data from your lengths of lines, determine: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw the minimum line </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw the maximum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw the mode (if there is one) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw the median </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw the range </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. NCTM Measurement Standards: <ul><li>Student: </li></ul><ul><li>- Understands measurable attributes of objects, units, and appropriate tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Applies techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Activities We Will Explore: <ul><li>A Nonstandard Ruler? ................................................................................1 </li></ul><ul><li>C Is For Conversion .....................................................................................5 </li></ul><ul><li>How Much Can I Do In One Minute?.............................................................11 </li></ul><ul><li>Literature Connection: </li></ul><ul><li>Counting on Frank ....................................................................................23 </li></ul><ul><li>Game Time ............ ..................................................................................25 </li></ul><ul><li>Jim and the Beanstalk ..............................................................................29 </li></ul><ul><li>Put Your Best Foot Forward .......................................................................31 </li></ul><ul><li>Tick Tock Time Flys By! ...........................................................................33 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Standard 3: Geometry Benchmark 2: Measurement and Estimation <ul><li>Most widely used applications of mathematics. </li></ul><ul><li>Bridges geometry and number. </li></ul><ul><li>Hands-On Experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing objects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This blue pencil is longer than the red pencil. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The basketball is bigger than the tennis ball. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Classroom Discourse <ul><li>Explanation of Results </li></ul><ul><li>Builds students conceptual and procedural knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Helps teachers learn about students understandings and misconceptions. </li></ul><ul><li>Helps to build vocabulary. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Teacher Questions <ul><li>After students have measured the desk using paper clips, ask what would happen if you measured with your crayon? Would the amount be more or less? </li></ul><ul><li>If they were to measure the distance to the lunchroom, what measuring tools would be appropriate? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Linear Measurement <ul><li>Linear Measurement should be the emphasis in the early grades. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct comparison - “Which crayon is longer?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of nonstandard units </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: Foot or hand; Paperclips, unifix cubes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of standard units </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: Ruler (nearest cm, inch, meter, and feet by the end of 2nd grade) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Literature Connection: <ul><li>Theme Teams </li></ul><ul><li>Put Your Best Foot Forward pgs. 31-32 </li></ul><ul><li>Read How Big Is a Foot? by Rolf Myller. </li></ul><ul><li>Students make beds, based upon the size of their feet. </li></ul><ul><li>Are all the beds the same? Why do you think the ruler was invented? </li></ul>
  11. 11. Literature Connection: <ul><li>Jim and the Beanstalk </li></ul><ul><li>Read Jim and the Beanstalk </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm the sequence of events in the story and list the events on a chart. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Picture Timeline of the story. Assign various inches (that add up to 36 inches) to each event depending upon your grade level. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Activity: A Nonstandard Ruler? <ul><li>Take a strip of paper (18” long) </li></ul><ul><li>Fold in 1/2, mark with a marker, and write “1/2”. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue this process for 1/4’s and 1/8’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Measure objects to the nearest ? </li></ul><ul><li>Record on paper. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw a sketch of the object, label the object, and record the length. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Nonlinear Measurements <ul><li>Comparison of objects. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: The blue bucket will hold more than the green bucket. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Using numbers to represent the number of the unit needed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: 3 scoops of sand to fill the bucket. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nonlinear Measurements: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity or Volume </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Weight: kg or pounds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Area/Perimeter </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Nonlinear Measurement: Time <ul><li>Calendars </li></ul><ul><li>Sequencing Events in Stories </li></ul><ul><li>Digital and Analog Clocks </li></ul>
  15. 15. Activity: Building a Useful Clock <ul><li>Each student makes a clock using bobby-pins(two sizes) and clock faces. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice showing different times: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Time we go to lunch </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time we go home </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time you eat dinner. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Literature Connection <ul><li>Tick Tock Time Flys By </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clean Sweep Campers </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Literature Connection <ul><li>Tick Tock Time Flys By </li></ul>
  18. 18. Literature Connection <ul><li>Game Time : </li></ul><ul><li>Read Game Time , stop at the following locations to ask the following questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Page 5 - “If it is October 7, and the game is in 7 days, on what date will be the big game?” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 9 - “If the girls got to the game at 9:00, and they have one hour to warm up, show on your clock what time the game begins?” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 12 - “For almost a quarter hour, no one scored, show with your clock what time is it?” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 14 - “5 minutes into the second period, Rebecca scored, show what time it is on your clock.” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 18 - “At half time, 30 minutes into the game, the time is 10:30. Show me 10:30 on your clock. What time will it be after their 15 minute break?” </li></ul><ul><li>Page 23 - “15 minutes long was the length of the third period. What time did the third period end? Show me on your clock.” </li></ul>
  19. 19. Activity: How Much Can I Do In One Minute? <ul><li>1. Brainstorm things they can be done in one minute. Can you brush your teeth? Can you get to school? Can you tie your shoes? </li></ul><ul><li>2. Predict how many times they could write their name in one minute. Write this estimate on a sticky note and place it in a pocket. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Working in pairs, Experiment to determine the answer. One student will watch the clock for one minute, while the second student writes their name. Students will then change roles. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Use this information to create a class graph. Possible graphs include: bar graph, frequency table, etc. </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>Apply techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements. </li></ul><ul><li>Through hands-on experiences students begin to realize using nonstandard units how the amounts vary. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. A General Plan of Instruction <ul><li>1. Understand the attribute being measured: Make comparisons based on the attribute. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Which item is longer? Shorter? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Which container holds more beans? Less beans? </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. A General Plan of Instruction <ul><li>2. Understand how filling, covering, matching, or making other comparisons of an attribute with units produces what is called a measure. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use physical models to fill, cover, match, or make the desired comparisons of the attribute with the unit. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Measure the area of your table using index cards, then estimate how many sticky notes would it take to cover your table top. </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. A General Plan of Instruction <ul><li>3. Understand the way measuring instruments work: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make measuring instruments and use them along with actual unit models to compare how each work. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suppose that I asked you to measure an empty bucket. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1st - What about the bucket is to be measured: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Height or depth </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Diameter (distance around) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Circumference </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Volume </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Weight </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Each of these aspects that can be measured is an attribute of the bucket. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2nd - Choose a unit of measure </li></ul></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Activity: C Is For Conversion
  25. 25. Integrating with Science
  26. 27. Assessing Measurement Concepts <ul><li>Understands measurable attributes of objects, units, and appropriate tools. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Compares the length of two objects. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Measures the length of an object to the nearest nonstandard unit. For example: paperclips. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Measures the length of an object to the nearest inch/cm. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Compares the area/weight/time of two or more objects. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Apply techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurement. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Determines the appropriate tool for an attribute (length, etc.) For example: Which tool would you use to weigh the block? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  27. 28. Student Interviews
  28. 29. Concept of the “Unit” <ul><li>Example in the student interview: </li></ul><ul><li>It is the spaces on the ruler and NOT the marks or numbers that are important when measuring. </li></ul>
  29. 30. For more information … <ul><li> http://essdack.org/michelle/Welcome%20.html </li></ul><ul><li> www.lulu.com (search Michelle Flaming for more Hands On Books) </li></ul><ul><li>Contact me at [email_address] </li></ul>

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