African-American Influence: Civil Rights & DanceAfrican-American Influence: Civil Rights & Dance
Timeline of EventsTimelin...
The Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance
1920s – 1930s1920s – 1930s
 The Harlem Renaissance, also knownThe Harlem Ren...
"Shuffle Along,""Shuffle Along,"
19211921
 music by Eubie Blakemusic by Eubie Blake
 lyrics by Noble Sisslelyrics by Nob...
““Runnin’ Wild”Runnin’ Wild”
19231923
 The black song and danceThe black song and dance
craze reached a fever pitchcraze ...
The New NegroThe New Negro
19251925
 Rhodes scholar Alain LeRoy Locke proclaimed the birth of "theRhodes scholar Alain Le...
Josephine BakerJosephine Baker
19251925
 Singer and dancerSinger and dancer
Josephine BakerJosephine Baker
performed in P...
Hot FiveHot Five
19261926
 1926: Jazz trumpeter and vocalist Louis Armstrong formed his "Hot Five"1926: Jazz trumpeter an...
New Negro Art TheaterNew Negro Art Theater
Dance GroupDance Group
19291929
 The New Negro Art Theater Dance GroupThe New ...
U.S. Government Syphilis StudiesU.S. Government Syphilis Studies
19321932
 The U.S. government began aThe U.S. government...
The Hampton Institute Creative Dance GroupThe Hampton Institute Creative Dance Group
19341934
 formed by Charles H. Willi...
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African american influence maybe add

  1. 1. African-American Influence: Civil Rights & DanceAfrican-American Influence: Civil Rights & Dance Timeline of EventsTimeline of Events By:By: Janet Andrade, Janel de la Torre, Morgan Griffin, Tim IrelandJanet Andrade, Janel de la Torre, Morgan Griffin, Tim Ireland Tia Miller, Kristen Roland, Marisa Souza, Craig HelgesenTia Miller, Kristen Roland, Marisa Souza, Craig Helgesen & Jinlee Jensen& Jinlee Jensen
  2. 2. The Harlem RenaissanceThe Harlem Renaissance 1920s – 1930s1920s – 1930s  The Harlem Renaissance, also knownThe Harlem Renaissance, also known as the “New Negro Movement”.as the “New Negro Movement”.  It was named after the 1925 anthologyIt was named after the 1925 anthology by Alain Locke and centered inby Alain Locke and centered in Harlem, NYC.Harlem, NYC.  It promoted a renewed sense of racialIt promoted a renewed sense of racial pride, cultural self-expression,pride, cultural self-expression, economic independence, andeconomic independence, and progressive politics.progressive politics.  In addition, it marked the first timeIn addition, it marked the first time that African-American artists andthat African-American artists and authors were taken seriously byauthors were taken seriously by American society. May African &American society. May African & Caribbean individuals living in ParisCaribbean individuals living in Paris were influenced by the Harlemwere influenced by the Harlem Renaissance.Renaissance.
  3. 3. "Shuffle Along,""Shuffle Along," 19211921  music by Eubie Blakemusic by Eubie Blake  lyrics by Noble Sisslelyrics by Noble Sissle  an all-black cast, opens on Broadway.an all-black cast, opens on Broadway.  It will become one of the greatestIt will become one of the greatest musical comedies in Americanmusical comedies in American history.history.
  4. 4. ““Runnin’ Wild”Runnin’ Wild” 19231923  The black song and danceThe black song and dance craze reached a fever pitchcraze reached a fever pitch when the "Charleston"when the "Charleston" became the big hit of thebecame the big hit of the Broadway show "Runnin'Broadway show "Runnin' Wild."Wild."
  5. 5. The New NegroThe New Negro 19251925  Rhodes scholar Alain LeRoy Locke proclaimed the birth of "theRhodes scholar Alain LeRoy Locke proclaimed the birth of "the New Negro" in his anthology of stories, poems, and essaysNew Negro" in his anthology of stories, poems, and essays entitled THE NEW NEGRO. It became the definitive work ofentitled THE NEW NEGRO. It became the definitive work of the Harlem Renaissance.the Harlem Renaissance.
  6. 6. Josephine BakerJosephine Baker 19251925  Singer and dancerSinger and dancer Josephine BakerJosephine Baker performed in Paris inperformed in Paris in "La Revue Negre,""La Revue Negre," and became one ofand became one of the most popularthe most popular entertainers in France.entertainers in France.
  7. 7. Hot FiveHot Five 19261926  1926: Jazz trumpeter and vocalist Louis Armstrong formed his "Hot Five"1926: Jazz trumpeter and vocalist Louis Armstrong formed his "Hot Five" band. It consisted of a trumpet, clarinet, and trombone and was backed by aband. It consisted of a trumpet, clarinet, and trombone and was backed by a rhythm section. It followed an original New Orleans-style of jazz. With therhythm section. It followed an original New Orleans-style of jazz. With the “Hot Five”, Armstrong became a jazz legend and a cultural icon.“Hot Five”, Armstrong became a jazz legend and a cultural icon.
  8. 8. New Negro Art TheaterNew Negro Art Theater Dance GroupDance Group 19291929  The New Negro Art Theater Dance GroupThe New Negro Art Theater Dance Group was created by Helmsley Winfield and Ednawas created by Helmsley Winfield and Edna Grey. It was sponsored by Ruth St. DenisGrey. It was sponsored by Ruth St. Denis and promoted a rush of African-Americanand promoted a rush of African-American talent and supported the Harlemtalent and supported the Harlem Renaissance.Renaissance.  In 1933, the company appeared in theIn 1933, the company appeared in the primer of Louis Gruenberg’s version ofprimer of Louis Gruenberg’s version of ‘’The Emperor Jones’’ at the Metropolitan‘’The Emperor Jones’’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, located in New York City.Museum of Art, located in New York City. Winfield took on the role of the witchWinfield took on the role of the witch doctor in the piece. Controversy around thedoctor in the piece. Controversy around the work resulted from the Metropolitanwork resulted from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s original request to blackenMuseum of Art’s original request to blacken white dancer’s faces rather than use Blackwhite dancer’s faces rather than use Black dancers on stagedancers on stage
  9. 9. U.S. Government Syphilis StudiesU.S. Government Syphilis Studies 19321932  The U.S. government began aThe U.S. government began a 40-year study in Tuskegee,40-year study in Tuskegee, Ala., on the effects of syphilisAla., on the effects of syphilis in 400 African American men,in 400 African American men, never telling the subjects theynever telling the subjects they have the disease or offeringhave the disease or offering any treatment.any treatment.
  10. 10. The Hampton Institute Creative Dance GroupThe Hampton Institute Creative Dance Group 19341934  formed by Charles H. Williams, head of physical education. Its repertoryformed by Charles H. Williams, head of physical education. Its repertory includes abstract works inspired by Negro spirituals and traditional Africanincludes abstract works inspired by Negro spirituals and traditional African dances of foreign students. Other traditionally black colleges also startdances of foreign students. Other traditionally black colleges also start concert dance companies.concert dance companies.  It is better known today as the Terpsichorean Dance Company.It is better known today as the Terpsichorean Dance Company.

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