Performance Assessment Strategies Chapter 2 Jeni LoDolce & Eric Blackwell Assessment in Art Education By Donna Kay Beattie
Distinction Among Types <ul><li>Assessment takes time and effort </li></ul><ul><li>Acquired a keen working knowledge or te...
Continued… <ul><li>“ Such assessment is time-consuming; we need to accept this and see it as part of the teaching process....
Continued… <ul><li>Most art assessment strategies currently used by art educators are performance-based. </li></ul><ul><ul...
Performance Assessment Strategies <ul><li>Portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Journals, diaries, logs </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate...
Portfolios <ul><li>A portfolio is a container or collection to store student artwork, right? WRONG! </li></ul><ul><li>It’s...
Evidence <ul><li>The art portfolio should… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have an introduction letter by student </li></ul></ul><ul...
Evidence continued… <ul><ul><li>Reveal a complete picture of and relate to specific goals of the art curriculum. </li></ul...
Evidence continued… <ul><li>AND LASTLY… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May include: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Table of content...
Evaluation <ul><li>Portfolios offer a wealth of multi-layered information about student learning </li></ul><ul><li>There a...
Evaluation continued… <ul><li>Holistic approach: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interested in the entire portfolio as a whole rathe...
Evaluation continued… <ul><li>Modified holistic: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wants discrete information about various areas of a...
Interpretation <ul><li>When the portfolio has been evaluated, the results need to be interpreted </li></ul><ul><li>Student...
With Portfolios the Teacher needs Management <ul><li>The design of the portfolio: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large folder, stap...
Management continued… <ul><li>Classroom time- should be periodically set aside for students and teachers to organize and w...
Mini-Portfolio <ul><li>It sorts the art curriculum into bit-size chunks </li></ul><ul><li>It may be a collection of art pr...
Journals, Diaries, Logs <ul><li>Journals, diaries, and logs are written and visual records of students ideas, reflections,...
Journals, Diaries, Logs continued… <ul><li>What is the student art journal? </li></ul><ul><li>How often is the journal use...
Assessment is very hard…
Chapter 2: Performance Assessment Strategies By Jeni LoDolce
Integrated Performances <ul><li>A task that has learning and assessment parts:  role-playing, extended written projects, g...
Integrated Performances <ul><li>Student are given a task description, instructions, aspects of the task that will be asses...
Integrated Performances <ul><li>Encourages creative and open-ended responses </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis knowledge </li></...
Disadvantages  of Integrated Performances <ul><li>They demand careful planning and scoring </li></ul><ul><li>It isn’t just...
Other Integrated Performance Strategies <ul><li>Group discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Student constructed performance projec...
Using Technology <ul><li>Audio or Video tapes </li></ul><ul><li>Computers  </li></ul>http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v = MF_...
The Value of Assessment Skit Activity (Based on the Strategy on page 25) <ul><li>The art ed faculty wants to eliminate fin...
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Arte387 Ch2

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Arte387 Ch2

  1. 1. Performance Assessment Strategies Chapter 2 Jeni LoDolce & Eric Blackwell Assessment in Art Education By Donna Kay Beattie
  2. 2. Distinction Among Types <ul><li>Assessment takes time and effort </li></ul><ul><li>Acquired a keen working knowledge or technical evaluation and assessment skills. </li></ul><ul><li>“Learning by doing” </li></ul>
  3. 3. Continued… <ul><li>“ Such assessment is time-consuming; we need to accept this and see it as part of the teaching process. There are no simple and cheap answers if we wish to have good quality assessment, and there never have been” –British education expert Caroline Gipps </li></ul>
  4. 4. Continued… <ul><li>Most art assessment strategies currently used by art educators are performance-based. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>what does this mean… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Performance assessment </li></ul>
  5. 5. Performance Assessment Strategies <ul><li>Portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Journals, diaries, logs </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated performance </li></ul><ul><li>Group discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibitions </li></ul><ul><li>Audio tapes and video tapes </li></ul><ul><li>Computers </li></ul>
  6. 6. Portfolios <ul><li>A portfolio is a container or collection to store student artwork, right? WRONG! </li></ul><ul><li>It’s a purposeful collection of student work that tells a story of the student’s efforts, progress, or achievement in given areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Progress, achievements, and experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating curriculum and determining necessary changes. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Evidence <ul><li>The art portfolio should… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have an introduction letter by student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reveal three kinds of physical evidence: primary, secondary, and extrinsic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Primary= visual, written, and oral evidence…notes, sketches, art objects, drafts audio/video tapes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Secondary= Reflections, interpretations, or judgments…teachers notes, logs, evaluative reports, quizzes, report cards </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Extrinsic= Evidence of student learning outside of school…hobbies, interests </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Evidence continued… <ul><ul><li>Reveal a complete picture of and relate to specific goals of the art curriculum. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show progress over time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show significant achievement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reveal learning difficulties </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reveal what is significant to the student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Involve the student in the process of selection, reflection, and justification </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Evidence continued… <ul><li>AND LASTLY… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May include: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Table of contents </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Outline </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Timeline of due dates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exit Letter </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Skills Chart </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Evaluation <ul><li>Portfolios offer a wealth of multi-layered information about student learning </li></ul><ul><li>There are three scoring approaches: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Holistic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analytic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modified holistic </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Evaluation continued… <ul><li>Holistic approach: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interested in the entire portfolio as a whole rather then single works. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scores the entire portfolio as </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a single corpus of information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Analytic approach: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A repository of different types of knowledge, each requiring its own mark </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each piece given a separate score and then summed up to get a single score </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Evaluation continued… <ul><li>Modified holistic: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wants discrete information about various areas of art learning, but also wants an overall score </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scoring the whole first and then several individual reports. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assessment strategies, along with performance criteria and judging or scoring strategies, should be clearly understood by all involved. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Interpretation <ul><li>When the portfolio has been evaluated, the results need to be interpreted </li></ul><ul><li>Student learning- as individuals and as a class </li></ul><ul><li>Effectiveness of the curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Learning environment </li></ul>The portfolio helps teachers address crucial questions about these three topics
  14. 14. With Portfolios the Teacher needs Management <ul><li>The design of the portfolio: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large folder, stapled sheets or cardboard, a box, the computer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mr. Blackwell, what about storage? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- This could be a big problem with little space, but consider cupboards or shelving units that are accessible to students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Examine students work independently or contains Secondary evidence= teachers observations notes, logs, evaluation reports, quizzes, or report cards, then security is crucial, and these portfolios should be kept in locked spaces. </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Management continued… <ul><li>Classroom time- should be periodically set aside for students and teachers to organize and work on the emerging portfolios. </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing portfolios- with parents, other teachers, other students, also need to be planned and executed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The portfolio may be conceived differently, such as a smaller book of information called a mini-portfolio </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Mini-Portfolio <ul><li>It sorts the art curriculum into bit-size chunks </li></ul><ul><li>It may be a collection of art products </li></ul><ul><li>Assess how well students can set a personal theme and develop a body of work </li></ul><ul><li>Works well for elementary teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Maintains the same characteristics of the expanded portfolio </li></ul><ul><li>Assessed and scored using holistic, analytic, or modified holistic scoring approaches </li></ul>
  17. 17. Journals, Diaries, Logs <ul><li>Journals, diaries, and logs are written and visual records of students ideas, reflections, experiences, explorations, notes, studies, replies to teacher’s questions, and statements on goals and objectives. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Journals, Diaries, Logs continued… <ul><li>What is the student art journal? </li></ul><ul><li>How often is the journal used? </li></ul><ul><li>How are journals assessed? </li></ul>
  19. 19. Assessment is very hard…
  20. 20. Chapter 2: Performance Assessment Strategies By Jeni LoDolce
  21. 21. Integrated Performances <ul><li>A task that has learning and assessment parts: role-playing, extended written projects, group projects, individualized student projects, demos, and experiments. </li></ul>http://www.artltdmag.com/admin2/data/upimages/heller_this-is-a-test.jpg http://judaica-art.com/images/uploads/6691-border.jpg
  22. 22. Integrated Performances <ul><li>Student are given a task description, instructions, aspects of the task that will be assessed, and a criteria for scoring. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicating that the task is being graded is key! </li></ul></ul>http://www.umpqua.cc.or.us/Other/images/grades.jpg
  23. 23. Integrated Performances <ul><li>Encourages creative and open-ended responses </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Addresses different styles of learning </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>http://henryjenkins.org/foe_poster.jpg http://collection.aucklandartgallery.govt.nz/ http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/Images/ss_l3_d_03_03_01_tcm4-251628.jpg
  24. 24. Disadvantages of Integrated Performances <ul><li>They demand careful planning and scoring </li></ul><ul><li>It isn’t just a fun activity </li></ul><ul><li>Not all students will get a chance to perform at their best </li></ul>http://www.blogcdn.com/www.wow.com/media/2008/03/tabletop-roleplaying-1268.jpg
  25. 25. Other Integrated Performance Strategies <ul><li>Group discussions </li></ul><ul><li>Student constructed performance projects </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibitions </li></ul>http://www.finearts.utexas.edu/images/art/design/class_discussion.jpg http://www.byronkeithbyrd.com/ http://www.eastpdxnews.com/ktmllite/images/
  26. 26. Using Technology <ul><li>Audio or Video tapes </li></ul><ul><li>Computers </li></ul>http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v = MF_HRKtJcsk
  27. 27. The Value of Assessment Skit Activity (Based on the Strategy on page 25) <ul><li>The art ed faculty wants to eliminate fine art portfolio reviews and instead use a student-constructed performance project. </li></ul><ul><li>Group A: is for this change. </li></ul><ul><li>Group B: is against it. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Using information from the presentation and chapter 2 in the book, construct your argument. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You will be graded as a group on your research, major issues presented, and solution to the issue. </li></ul></ul>

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