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<ul><li>The Pledge of Allegiance </li></ul><ul><li>By: Mary Ellen Wessel </li></ul>
<ul><li>“ The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise to be loyal to our republic. Other ways citizens can affirm their citizens...
<ul><li>Where did the Pledge come from? </li></ul><ul><li>What does the Pledge mean? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is the Pledge i...
<ul><li>1.2.5 Define what a citizen is and describe the characteristics of good citizenship. </li></ul><ul><li>1.2.6 Know ...
<ul><li>Students will create a class flag. Flags will be hung around the room. Students will vote on which flag they want ...
<ul><li>The Pledge first appeared in a Boston youth magazine called “The Youth's Companion.” It was 22 words long and was ...
<ul><li>The words in red are words that were added. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.homeofheroes.com/hallofheroes/1st_floor/f...
<ul><li>“ I pledge allegiance” (I promise to be true) </li></ul><ul><li>“ to the flag” (to the symbol of our country) </li...
Red Skelton learned the pledge this way from one of his teachers. Later he recorded it. This version of the pledge defines...
<ul><li>“ Reciting the Pledge is a mark of patriotism to the country. It symbolizes one's loyalty to the U.S. and the feel...
<ul><li>“ The pledge is to be recited by standing at attention; facing the flag and placing the right hand over the heart....
<ul><li>Sterner, C. D. (1999-2008).  The Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag  . Retrieved from http://www.homeo...
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Inquiry Project 1 Pledge Of Allegiance

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Inquiry Project 1 Pledge Of Allegiance

  1. 1. <ul><li>The Pledge of Allegiance </li></ul><ul><li>By: Mary Ellen Wessel </li></ul>
  2. 2. <ul><li>“ The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise to be loyal to our republic. Other ways citizens can affirm their citizenship include voting, serving in the military and volunteering to help solve community problems.” (Indicator 2.2.6) </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Where did the Pledge come from? </li></ul><ul><li>What does the Pledge mean? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is the Pledge important for the U.S.? </li></ul><ul><li>How is the Pledge supposed to be recited? </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>1.2.5 Define what a citizen is and describe the characteristics of good citizenship. </li></ul><ul><li>1.2.6 Know the Pledge of Allegiance and understand that it is a promise to be loyal to the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>2.2.5 Identify people who are good citizens and describe the character traits that make them admirable. </li></ul><ul><li>2.2.6 Discuss and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance and identify other ways citizens affirm their citizenship. </li></ul><ul><li>3.2.5 Explain the importance of being a good citizen of the state and the nation. Identify people in the state who exhibit the characteristics of good citizenship. </li></ul><ul><li>3.2.6 Explain the role citizens have in making decisions and rules within the community, state and nation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Students will create a class flag. Flags will be hung around the room. Students will vote on which flag they want for the class. </li></ul><ul><li>Students will then create their own pledge to the classroom. Pledges will be put on scrolls of paper. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>The Pledge first appeared in a Boston youth magazine called “The Youth's Companion.” It was 22 words long and was intended to be used by school children to use to commemorate the 400 th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America. </li></ul><ul><li>The author of the pledge is Francis Bellamy. Bellamy was an educator who served as chairman of the National committee of educators, an American Baptist minister, and active social activist. </li></ul><ul><li>The pledge first appeared in the September 8, 1892 issue of “The Youth Companion”, and a month later more than 12 million school children recited the words for the first time in schools across the nation. </li></ul><ul><li>Flag Day, June 14, 1923, the words were altered to mention the United States flag. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1924 “of America” was added. </li></ul><ul><li>Flag Day, 1954 President Dwight D. Eisenhower approved adding the words &quot;under God&quot;. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.homeofheroes.com/hallofheroes/1st_floor/flag/1bfc_pledge.html </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>The words in red are words that were added. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.homeofheroes.com/hallofheroes/1st_floor/flag/1bfc_pledge.html </li></ul>I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all. October 11, 1892 I pledge allegiance to my the Flag of the United States , and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all. June 14, 1923 I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation under God , indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all. June 14, 1954 I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , and to the Republic for which it stands: one Nation indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all. June 14, 1924
  8. 8. <ul><li>“ I pledge allegiance” (I promise to be true) </li></ul><ul><li>“ to the flag” (to the symbol of our country) </li></ul><ul><li>“ of the United States of America” (each state that has joined to make our country) </li></ul><ul><li>“ and to the Republic” (a republic is a country where the people choose others to make laws for them -- the government is “of, by and for” the people) </li></ul><ul><li>“ for which it stands,” (the flag means the country) </li></ul><ul><li>“ one nation” (a single country) </li></ul><ul><li>“ under God,” (the people believe in a supreme being) </li></ul><ul><li>“ indivisible,” (the country cannot be split into parts) </li></ul><ul><li>“ with Liberty and Justice” (with freedom and fairness) </li></ul><ul><li>“ for all.” (for each person in the country) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.wvsd.uscourts.gov/outreach/Pledge.htm </li></ul>
  9. 9. Red Skelton learned the pledge this way from one of his teachers. Later he recorded it. This version of the pledge defines each word of the pledge. I: Me; an individual; a committee of one. Pledge: Dedicate all of my worldly goods to give without self-pity. Allegiance: My love and my devotion. To the Flag: Our standard; Old Glory ; a symbol of Freedom; wherever she waves there is respect, because your loyalty has given her a dignity that shouts, Freedom is everybody's job. United: That means that we have all come together. States: Individual communities that have united into forty-eight great states. Forty-eight individual communities with pride and dignity and purpose. All divided with imaginary boundaries, yet united to a common purpose, and that is love for country. And to the Republic: Republic--a state in which sovereign power is invested in representatives chosen by the people to govern. And government is the people; and it's from the people to the leaders, not from the leaders to the people. For which it stands ,One Nation: One Nation--meaning, so blessed by God. Indivisible: Incapable of being divided. With Liberty: Which is Freedom; the right of power to live one's own life, without threats, fear, or some sort of retaliation. And Justice: The principle, or qualities, of dealing fairly with others. For All: For All--which means, boys and girls, it's as much your country as it is mine. http://www.mamarocks.com/pledge_of_allegiance.htm
  10. 10. <ul><li>“ Reciting the Pledge is a mark of patriotism to the country. It symbolizes one's loyalty to the U.S. and the feeling that as an American one is proud to be a part of this country.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.buzzle.com/articles/why-is-the-pledge-of-allegiance-important.html </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>“ The pledge is to be recited by standing at attention; facing the flag and placing the right hand over the heart. People in uniform must face the flag, remain silent and take the military salute. Those not in uniform must remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and place it on the their left shoulder, in such a way that their right hand is over the heart.” </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.buzzle.com/articles/why-is-the-pledge-of-allegiance-important.html </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Sterner, C. D. (1999-2008). The Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag . Retrieved from http://www.homeofheroes.com/hallofheroes/1st_floor/flag/1bfc_pledge.html </li></ul><ul><li>Pledge of Allegiance. Retrieved from http://www.wvsd.uscourts.gov/outreach/Pledge.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Pledge of Allegiance. Retrieved from http://www.mamarocks.com/pledge_of_allegiance.htm </li></ul><ul><li>(2000-2008). Why is the Pledge of Allegiance Important. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com/articles/why-is-the-pledge-of-allegiance-important.html </li></ul>

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