Case study: e-Learning for KidsGiorgio Sironi (Nest Group)
Description• Service: series of self-contained  applications  – developed independently  – categorized by subject and stud...
Description• Didactive objectives  – Treat non-classroom subjects  – Availability as additional work for best students  – ...
Browsing the website:     homepage
Browsing the website:        homepage• Starts with customization  – Access to the various thematic channels  – Selection o...
Browsing the website:     games list
Browsing the website:        games list• Topics            The subjects list  – math            complements  – language   ...
Browsing the website:   game example
Browsing the website:      game example• Flow of information in multiple  channels  – Audio, video  – Text  – Animations• ...
Browsing the website: in-    game navigation
Browsing the website: in-     game navigation• Glossary• Audio controls  – Audio is not strictly necessary, fallback    to...
Browsing the website:    completion
Browsing the website:       completion• Game completion certificate  – Reward for the student  – Printable or exportable  ...
Strengths & weaknesses• Cost model – One-time production of content, little   maintenance – Freely available, redistributa...
Conclusions & take-aways• Game-based interactions are  attractive for children• Multiple units (e.g. games) allow to  para...
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E learning for kids

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E learning for kids

  1. 1. Case study: e-Learning for KidsGiorgio Sironi (Nest Group)
  2. 2. Description• Service: series of self-contained applications – developed independently – categorized by subject and students grade (K12) – Game-based, continuous interaction to foster attention• Target users: low grade students• Main actors: game developers, students, teachers (for selection)
  3. 3. Description• Didactive objectives – Treat non-classroom subjects – Availability as additional work for best students – Differentiates the experiences of students• Business model – Donations and research grants – Volunteering – Redistribution by partners
  4. 4. Browsing the website: homepage
  5. 5. Browsing the website: homepage• Starts with customization – Access to the various thematic channels – Selection of the students grade• Leads to filtered lists
  6. 6. Browsing the website: games list
  7. 7. Browsing the website: games list• Topics The subjects list – math complements – language K12 education: it – science is also oriented – computer to topics that are – environmental not treated in – health the classroom – life skills – laundry
  8. 8. Browsing the website: game example
  9. 9. Browsing the website: game example• Flow of information in multiple channels – Audio, video – Text – Animations• Interaction with standard devices – Mouse – Keyboard
  10. 10. Browsing the website: in- game navigation
  11. 11. Browsing the website: in- game navigation• Glossary• Audio controls – Audio is not strictly necessary, fallback to text• Game play movement – Back/forward to skip and repeat scenes – Pause/replay
  12. 12. Browsing the website: completion
  13. 13. Browsing the website: completion• Game completion certificate – Reward for the student – Printable or exportable – Customizable with the students name• Does not tie-in with other games or the rest of the platform – Lack of integration between games
  14. 14. Strengths & weaknesses• Cost model – One-time production of content, little maintenance – Freely available, redistributable for royalties• Lack of integration between games should be addressed – Experience ends with each game – Children are not tracked between sessions
  15. 15. Conclusions & take-aways• Game-based interactions are attractive for children• Multiple units (e.g. games) allow to parallelize development – multiple domains: science, math, literature...

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