MA English Education
SUBJECT: 211 APPROACHES IN TEACHING LISTENING AND SPEAKING
STUDENT: MERLYN D. MOSTOLES
PROFESSOR: DR....
Learning Language Arts:

An Active and
Constructive Process
Objectives
At the end of the discussion, graduate students are expected to:
A.] gain knowledge with regards to the theoret...
Introduction
(Cox. C., 2002,
Teaching Language
Arts; 1-18)
Teaching Language Arts for
Multicultural Education, Yang,
Tae-s...
An important goal of
teaching language arts is
improving language
competence for all students.
Guide Questions:
How then, can we improve the language
competence of our students?
What activities will aid us in attain...
Discussion
The

three theoretical perspectives that
underlie the approach in this presentation
suggest that learning lang...
What Is a Constructivist
Approach to Teaching?
The constructivist theory of education was developed by Lev Vygotsky, a
psy...
Jean Piaget
Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget's cognitive theory of
learning development contributes to our standing of
const...
Constructivism applies to language
learning in four ways:


1) Readers actively build meaning as they read, rather than
p...
Constructivism also applies to
teaching language arts.
Teachers can help students learn these four skills.


1) to make c...
Activity
Compare

the traditional classroom
and constructivist classroom. What
activities can promote/ support the
constr...
Answer:
Traditional Classroom
Places the teacher as the single
directive authority: depends on
textbooks, teaches by repet...
Constructivist Learning
Activities
Working

With Others
Active Learning
Scaffolding Learning
The Spiral Curriculum
Deepening the Topic (Relating the Topic to
Significant Human Experience)


Guided by our field of experience, give opinio...
Thank You 

The End
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Merlyn/Learning Language Arts//

  1. 1. MA English Education SUBJECT: 211 APPROACHES IN TEACHING LISTENING AND SPEAKING STUDENT: MERLYN D. MOSTOLES PROFESSOR: DR. RENELYN BAUTISTA
  2. 2. Learning Language Arts: An Active and Constructive Process
  3. 3. Objectives At the end of the discussion, graduate students are expected to: A.] gain knowledge with regards to the theoretical perspective that learning language arts is an active and constructive process; B.] cite/enumerate activities which promote/ support the constructivist approach in teaching language arts; C.] and guided by his/ her field of experience, give opinion on the relationship of listening and speaking in learning and teaching language arts
  4. 4. Introduction (Cox. C., 2002, Teaching Language Arts; 1-18) Teaching Language Arts for Multicultural Education, Yang, Tae-sik, Dept. of Korean Language Education • Language arts have traditionally been defined in elementary teaching as "listening, speaking, reading, and writing." • Students’ use of language is audible and visible. Other times, it is silent and invisible. The language arts also include language conventions : spelling, punctuation, grammar usage, and handwriting. Newer skills such as word processing are part of the language arts, as well.
  5. 5. An important goal of teaching language arts is improving language competence for all students.
  6. 6. Guide Questions: How then, can we improve the language competence of our students? What activities will aid us in attaining this goal? What will be our role as teachers of the language arts?
  7. 7. Discussion The three theoretical perspectives that underlie the approach in this presentation suggest that learning language arts is an active, constructive process, a social interactive process, and a transactional process (Cox. C., 2002; 11~ 22).
  8. 8. What Is a Constructivist Approach to Teaching? The constructivist theory of education was developed by Lev Vygotsky, a psychologist and educator born in 1896. Vygotsky's theory was centered on the principles of social constructivism. Jerome Bruner later combined Vygotsky's theories with those of Jean Piaget, a cognitivist who regarded students as learners in their own right, learning through their experiences. Vygotsky's ideas, along with those of Piaget, became widely influential in the 1960s. Their "child-centered" theory challenged didactic teaching, the more authoritative approach that had previously been favored. The theories of constructivism put forth by Piaget, Vygotsky and Bruner all have implications for contemporary classroom practice. (By Alison Williams, eHow Contributor)
  9. 9. Jean Piaget Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget's cognitive theory of learning development contributes to our standing of constructivism. Piaget explains that all learning is an active process in which the learner continually constructs meaning. According to Piaget, young children learn to organize their experiences and adapt to their environments through the processes of assimilation, accommodation and equilibration.
  10. 10. Constructivism applies to language learning in four ways:  1) Readers actively build meaning as they read, rather than passively receiving messages.  2) The text does not say it all; the reader brings information to the text.  3) A single text can have multiple meanings because of differences among readers and contexts.  4) Reading and writing are similar constructive processes, rather than separate ones.
  11. 11. Constructivism also applies to teaching language arts. Teachers can help students learn these four skills.  1) to make connections between what they already know and what they will learn  2) to use strategies for reading(e.g., make predictions) and writing(e.g., draw on prior experience)  3) to think about their own reading and writing processes  4) to discuss their responses to text they or others read and write
  12. 12. Activity Compare the traditional classroom and constructivist classroom. What activities can promote/ support the constructivist approach in teaching language arts?
  13. 13. Answer: Traditional Classroom Places the teacher as the single directive authority: depends on textbooks, teaches by repetition, and tests knowledge through exams. Constructivist Classroom Places the teacher as a guide on a subject, while students are the active researchers and discoverers of knowledge. Teachers use primary resources to teach, interactive learning, group work, and student-led pursuits.
  14. 14. Constructivist Learning Activities Working With Others Active Learning Scaffolding Learning The Spiral Curriculum
  15. 15. Deepening the Topic (Relating the Topic to Significant Human Experience)  Guided by our field of experience, give opinion on the relationship of listening and speaking. What are its implications in learning and teaching the language arts or how does it affect our daily lives?  Speaking and listening share a very close relationship of communication. They really couldn't exist without the other. There is a symbiotic relationship between speaking and listening. One cannot exist without the other effectively. This goes back to the age old saying, if a tree falls in the forest but if no one is around to hear it did the tree actually make any noise when it fell. You can speak all you want but if no one is listening there is no point in speaking. You can listen all you want but if no one is speaking there is no point in listening. It is our own choice who we talk to and who we listen to, but shutting out everyone will not lead to anything good. If someone had physical pain that was not visible and they did not let someone know where that pain was or how bad it was, no one would be able to help them. They could end up being severely injured. The same goes for emotional pain too. Without letting someone know the pain being felt, it will only get worse.
  16. 16. Thank You  The End

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