Exploring socialising in a social way - case study of online research communities

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Exploring socialising in a social way - case study of online research communities

presented at QRWEBA2011 conference

organised by Merlien Institute

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Exploring socialising in a social way - case study of online research communities

  1. 1. Exploring socialisingin a social wayA case study of online researchcommunitiesDianne GardinerManaging Director, Latitude Insights (AU)Qualitative Research in Web 2.0 Asia PacificFebruary 2011
  2. 2. Why online qualitative approach was used… Breadth and Depth Anonymity … greater truth Longitudinal Iterative approachAn intrinsic part of Australian culture
  3. 3. Why online qualitativeapproach was used…Breadth and DepthLongitudinalIterative approachAnonymity
  4. 4. Welcome to ‘The Lounge’
  5. 5. 100+ members18-35 year oldMostly single / couplesPre-kidsMix of students and workersLight - heavy drinkers Marcail
  6. 6. 100+ members Over 30 years old Many were parentsLight - heavy drinkers Susan
  7. 7. The Nutsand Bolts
  8. 8. Sharing Demonstrating Nurturing authenticity Self-disclosure Non-judgmentalBuilding trust
  9. 9. Susan’s (Moderator) BlogOh, what a night!Thank you all soooo much for crossing your fingersand toes, it worked! The weather was fantastic andthe party went off without a hitch. I had the rightamount of drinks, thanks to all your great advice!The picture above is of my twin sister and me at theparty. As promised here are a few of the partysnaps.
  10. 10. Conducted over 3 monthsNovember – January
  11. 11. Stimulating conversations
  12. 12. Unintentionally over-doing it Drunken behaviour of others Consequences of excess Food and alcohol Alcohol and underage children Food’s role in socialising ‘Shout the nation’ campaignParent’s drinking behaviour Drinking alone Abstaining challenge Friends associated with relaxation Christmas and New Year’s Strategies to reduce stress Drinking rituals Pacing yourself over Christmas Socializing rituals Meaning of ‘moderation’Your first time Choosing to go without Change with ageDrinking with family vs. friends It’s going to be BIG The language of drinking Melb Cup celebrations Friends associated with a ‘big night’ Friends that influence you A typical week night? Preparation rituals Your social events Tips for recovery
  13. 13. The role ofAnonymity
  14. 14. Getting personal
  15. 15. Detail… detail… detail
  16. 16. Mix it up with stimulus
  17. 17. Deprivation challenge
  18. 18. Language
  19. 19. Someone who has drunk too much
  20. 20. Heavy Drinker Non-drinker
  21. 21. Heavy Drinker
  22. 22. Non-Drinker
  23. 23. The ThePervasiveness Tolerance forof Alcohol Drunkenness
  24. 24. Alcohol is…an expected part of some occasions Buck’s/ Hen’s Night Adult’s birthday party Child’s christening New’s Year’s Eve Baby Shower Local sporting club event/ celebration Wedding Family picnic Girl’s / boy’s night out Sporting event Dinner with friends Dinner with family After work gathering with colleaguesDay at the cricket Funeral Work function Music festival Work Christmas Party Party at your house Work lunch BBQ Party at someone’s house Day at the beach
  25. 25. But it is…an accepted part of almost any occasion Buck’s/ Hen’s Night Adult’s birthday party Child’s birthday party Child’s christening New’s Year’s Eve Baby Shower Local sporting club event/ celebration Wedding Family picnic Girl’s / boy’s night out Sporting event Dinner with friends Dinner with family After work gathering with colleaguesDay at the cricket Funeral Work function Music festival Work Christmas Party Party at your house Work lunch BBQ Party at someone’s house Church / religious group Day at the beach Study group
  26. 26. Getting drunk is… accepted on many occasions Buck’s/ Hen’s Night Adult’s birthday party Child’s birthday party Child’s christening New’s Year’s Eve Baby Shower Local sporting club event/ celebration Wedding Family picnic Girl’s / boy’s night out Sporting event Dinner with friends Dinner with family After work gathering with colleaguesDay at the cricket Funeral Work function Music festival Work Christmas Party Party at your house Work lunch BBQ Party at someone’s house Church / religious group Day at the beach Study group
  27. 27. Some lessons worth sharingDifference between Younger and OlderCommunity ‘break’Sensitive issues
  28. 28. Each community is unique, and needs toTips for be treated as suchrunning Need to be flexible (client included)concurrent Discussion / conversation guide needs to evolve over time for each communitycommunities Moderators need to work together and independently
  29. 29. Thank you for listeningDianne Gardiner, Managing Director, Latitude Insightsemail dianne@latitudeinsights.com.auphone + 61 417 323 765twitter @DiGardinerweb www.latitudeinsights.com.aublog www.parellelinsights.com
  30. 30. Presented at the Asia-Pacific conference on Qualitative Research in Web 2.0 22 & 23 Feb 2011, Macau SAR For more information Please visit: http://www.merlien.org

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