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Business Storytelling and Soft Power

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Business Storytelling and Soft Power - Training by Philippe Méda, Merkapt on business pitch for startups and innovative corporate projects.

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Business Storytelling and Soft Power

  1. 1. STORYTELLING Business Storytelling & Soft Power Development. Philippe Méda @merkapt
  2. 2. Course Perspective More than often, business education tends to consider business ventures as complex mechanisms that can eventually be deconstructed and rebuilt to match a specific purpose. This mechanistic view comes short at many levels. It’s for example quite obvious to see that it’s not that often that the best designed, or well thought business ideas, eventually pull through and become successful ventures. One of the key skills of successful entrepreneurs is very symptomatic: they are tremendously persuasive, and manage to create a solid, long-term commitment to their business vision. Leaders such as Steve Jobs, or Richard Branson, have been well known for projecting a œreality distortion field’ around them: a way of communicating their ideas, that would eventually bend the most unapologetic competitor to their perspective. If their personal charisma plays an obvious part in their way of communicating, it cannot be reduced to that only. Most of them would spend weeks, if not months, preparing a one- hour communication or demo. Nowadays, entrepreneurs need even more to be ultra persuasive so as to leverage any interest in their market, secure funding, and most importantly hire talented people. This course will explain the key elements and techniques of oral and written communication, in the perspective of creating a new venture as an entrepreneur ẃ in a for- profit or non-profit perspective, or a new business unit as an intrapreneur in a large corporation. Business Pitch & Communication
  3. 3. "To me marketing is about values. This is a very complicated world, it's a very noisy world, and we're not going to get a chance to get people to remember very much about us, no company is. So we have to be very clear about what we want them to know about us." Steve JOBS, Think Different campaign Telling Your Story
  4. 4. Why Do We Need Stories? KEYNOTE Investor’s PITCH Business Plan Shareholder’s Report HARD FACTS Reason Facts Projections Accounts Specifications Metrics
  5. 5. STORY 1 min PITCH TED Talk Video Teaser SOFT SKILLS Emotions Vision Values Instinct Feelings Empathy KEYNOTE Investor’s PITCH Business Plan Shareholder’s Report HARD FACTS Reason Facts Projections Accounts Specifications Metrics Why Do We Need Stories?
  6. 6. Most people care the most about the things that touch, move, and inspire them. They make decisions based on emotion, and then look for the facts that support these decisions. Thus it behooves every entrepreneur to learn how to craft stories from their personal experience and the world at large that make an emotional connection, as well as tie in the facts. Mark EVANS, Forbes Why Do We Need Stories?
  7. 7. Is Your Hearth Racing Faster?
  8. 8. Is Your Hearth Racing Faster?
  9. 9. Your Reptilian Brain seconds Flee or Fight? Friend or Foe? Empathy? 2
  10. 10. Your Reptilian Brain Happy Sad Angry Surprise Fear Disgust
  11. 11. Mirror Neurons Observation of an action, automatically triggers simulation of that action in the brain.
  12. 12. Where Were You?
  13. 13. The Power of Stories
  14. 14. The Power of Stories
  15. 15. The Power of Stories
  16. 16. The Power of Stories
  17. 17. « Hello, I'm a Mac » - 2006-2009 Apple Campaign The Power of Stories
  18. 18. JapanUSUK Personal & Cultural The Power of Stories
  19. 19. Building a Meme A meme (/ˈmiːm/ meem) is an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture. The word meme is a shortening (modeled on gene) of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα Greek pronunciation: [míːmɛːma] mīmēma, "imitated thing", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos "mime") and it was coined by the British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena.
  20. 20. Seeking compensation for a client who had lost both arms in an accident, Moe Levine surprised the court and jury, who were accustomed to long closing arguments, by painting a brief and emotionally devastating picture instead: As you know, about an hour ago we broke for lunch. I saw the bailiff come and take you all as a group to have lunch in the jury room. Then I saw the defense attorney, Mr. Horowitz. He and his client decided to go to lunch together. The judge and court clerk went to lunch. So, I turned to my client, Harold, and said « Why don’t you and I go to lunch together? » We went across the street to that little restaurant and had lunch. (Significant pause.) Ladies and gentlemen, I just had lunch with my client. He has no arms. He has to eat like a dog. Thank you very much. Levine reportedly won one of the largest settlements in the history of the state of New York. The Power of Stories
  21. 21. « The Force » - 2011 Volkswagen Commercial The Power of Stories
  22. 22. Louis CK, Stand-up Comedian The Power of Stories
  23. 23. Everything is a Remix Kirby Ferguson
  24. 24. The Monomyth
  25. 25. The Hero with a Thousand Faces
  26. 26. The Hero’s Journey Ordinary world The problem is hidden 1
  27. 27. The Hero’s Journey Ordinary world The problem is hidden 1 2 3 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky
  28. 28. The Hero’s Journey Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 1 2 3 4 5 6 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated ORDINARY World Core Market SPECIAL World Early Market
  29. 29. The Hero’s Journey Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 1 2 3 4 5 68 7 9 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted ORDINARY World Core Market SPECIAL World Early Market
  30. 30. The Hero’s Journey Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out The road back The core market is targeted 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 11 10 8 7 9 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted Return with elixir The innovation goes mainstream Resurrection The final resistance is met and overcome ORDINARY World Core Market SPECIAL World Early Market
  31. 31. The Hero’s Journey Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 1 2 3 4 5 6 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated 1 2 3 4 5 6
  32. 32. The Hero’s Journey Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off The road back The core market is targeted 12 11 10 8 7 9 The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted Return with elixir The innovation goes mainstream Resurrection The final resistance is met and overcome 9 8 7 12 11 10
  33. 33. You admire a hero, for not being a hero Ordinary world The problem is hidden 1 2 3 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky
  34. 34. Unfavorable odds can be beaten with the right nudge Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 4 5 6 Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated
  35. 35. We all want to believe that at the bottom of the pit there’s hope… Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off 8 7 9 The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted
  36. 36. What really matters is the change inside… The road back The core market is targeted 12 11 10 Return with elixir The innovation goes mainstream Resurrection The final resistance is met and overcome
  37. 37. Business is a story
  38. 38. The Social Network, 2010
  39. 39. Bill HEWLETT & Dave PACKARD, 1939
  40. 40. Bill HEWLETT & Dave PACKARD, 1939
  41. 41. Bill HEWLETT & Dave PACKARD, 1939
  42. 42. Walt DISNEY, 1923
  43. 43. Business is a Story
  44. 44. Business is a Story
  45. 45. Business is a Story
  46. 46. Business is a Story
  47. 47. Business is a Story
  48. 48. Business is a Story
  49. 49. How Starbucks Fought For Its Life without Losing Its Soul In 2008, Howard Schultz, the president and chairman of Starbucks, made the unprecedented decision to return as the CEO eight years after he stepped down from daily oversight of the company and became chairman. Concerned that Starbucks had lost its way, Schultz was determined to help it return to its core values and restore not only its financial health, but also its soul. In Onward, he shares the remarkable story of his return and the company's ongoing transformation under his leadership, revealing how, during one of the most tumultuous economic times in history, Starbucks again achieved profitability and sustainability without sacrificing humanity. Business is a Story
  50. 50. Hans Rosling TED Talk, 2006 Seeing the Story Through the Data
  51. 51. Business is a Story
  52. 52. Business is a Story
  53. 53. Business is a Story
  54. 54. Storytelling and Pitch 1. Problem 2. Solution 3. Business model 4. Your magic 5. Sales and marketing 6. Competition 7. Team 8. Milestones 9. Status and calendar 10. Call to action = STORY FACTS
  55. 55. 1. Problem 2. Solution 3. Business model 4. Your magic 5. Sales and marketing 6. Competition 7. Team 8. Milestones 9. Status and calendar 10. Call to action Storytelling and Pitch Ordinary world The problem is hidden 1 2 3 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky
  56. 56. 1. Problem 2. Solution 3. Business model 4. Your magic 5. Sales and marketing 6. Competition 7. Team 8. Milestones 9. Status and calendar 10. Call to action Storytelling and Pitch Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 1 2 3 4 5 6 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated
  57. 57. 1. Problem 2. Solution 3. Business model 4. Your magic 5. Sales and marketing 6. Competition 7. Team 8. Milestones 9. Status and calendar 10. Call to action Storytelling and Pitch Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out 1 2 3 4 5 68 7 9 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted
  58. 58. 1. Problem 2. Solution 3. Business model 4. Your magic 5. Sales and marketing 6. Competition 7. Team 8. Milestones 9. Status and calendar 10. Call to action Storytelling and Pitch Reward Innovation starts to work and pay off Ordinary world The problem is hidden Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and points a way out The road back The core market is targeted 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 11 10 8 7 9 Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly Refusal of the call Change is deemed to risky Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated The belly of the whale Innovation is started in the « garage » Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted Return with elixir The innovation goes mainstream Resurrection The final resistance is met and overcome
  59. 59. Detect the narrative
  60. 60. Case study: detect the narrative Added Value Moving people The uber app connects you with a driver at a tap of a button Get it done Uberx make it easy and affordable to take care of your everyday Make it a night out Kick off your evening with no reservations Be the boss Take a meeting on your way to the meeting Arrive in style Show up ready for the occasion Go global Use uber wherever you land next
  61. 61. READ www.theverge.com > Uber the outlaw: a rogue startup fights the taxi power www.uber.com Case study: detect the narrative
  62. 62. Case study: detect the narrative 4. Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and point a way out
  63. 63. 4. Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and point a way out 8. Ordeal Opponents helding the status quo are confronted http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/7/3300244/uber-taxi-new-york-travis-kalanick-rogue 6. Test, allies, ennemies Experiments are initiated
  64. 64. Case study: detect the narrative 10. The road back The core market is targeted
  65. 65. Detect the narrative: show, don’t tell
  66. 66. Detect the narrative: show, don’t tell
  67. 67. Detect the narrative: show, don’t tell 2. Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly
  68. 68. Detect the narrative: show, don’t tell 4. Meeting the mentor A key element is unlocked and point a way out 2. Call to adventure The problem manifests itself abruptly
  69. 69. Detect the narrative product placement 5. Crossing the threshold Innovation is acted 12. Return with elixir The innovation goes mainstream
  70. 70. List all the « Hooks » Michael Pollan on Sustainable food
  71. 71. Your Storyboard
  72. 72. The Cast
  73. 73. Superheroes They are iconic characters with extraordinary abilities to circumvent intellectual and, or physical limitations. CEO, CTO, CFO
  74. 74. Reality distortion field Bends reality to its vision Plans BIG Thinks long term Pushes forward Knows when to pivot Secondary powers: limited precognition / apotheosis Super-weakness: radioactive and burns out employees The CEO
  75. 75. Psychokinesis Manipulates objects, atoms, with its mind Obsesses on « getting it right » Thinks short term Insulated from reality Extra-power : super-speed / mind-control resistance Super-weakness: autism The CTO Evan Williams, Twitter
  76. 76. Chronokinesis Accelerates TTM Moves through the plan Thinks medium / long term Prepares the next step ahead Extra-power : creates resources from thin air / super-connector Super-weakness: won’t pivot The CFO
  77. 77. Mentor The Extended Team…
  78. 78. The Storyboard VISION Meeting the mentor Crossing the threshold STRUGGLE Test, allies, ennemies Reward, Ordeal The belly of the whale RESOLUTION The road back Resurrection Return with elixir ☺ CONFLICT Ordinary World Call to adventure Refusal of the call Story 800 Characters AND Video storyboard 1 min OR Website 1 page Dramatize Share personal moments Connect everything together
  79. 79. RESOLUTION The road back Resurrection Return with elixir STRUGGLE Test, allies, ennemies Reward, Ordeal The belly of the whale VISION Meeting the mentor Crossing the threshold CONFLICT Ordinary World Call to adventure Refusal of the call Why were you doing the same things at that time? Who were the gate keepers? How was the status quo when you started? How are you prepared somehow? Why was it acceptable for the market? How was the technology? What were the prevailing forces of this era? How would you describe this world? Who were the incumbents? What were the obstacles? Why was the leap of faith difficult? How frequent was the problem? How was it propagated? What were the actual pain points? Who was still enforcing the status quo? Why some customers keep the blindfolds? What were the first symptoms? What was the shocking revelation? The Storyboard 1/4 Where did they came from? What was their business model?
  80. 80. CONFLICT Ordinary World Call to adventure Refusal of the call RESOLUTION The road back Resurrection Return with elixir STRUGGLE Test, allies, ennemies Reward, Ordeal The belly of the whale The Storyboard 2/4 VISION Meeting the mentor Crossing the threshold What was your incentive? How were your difficulties broadcasted? What did you discover that unlocked the problem? How did you had to move ahead anyway? What made it a personal problem in the end? What part of your past history finally helped tremendously? How was the specific day where it all started? What was the symbolic act that you did to cut the bridge to the past? How did you network reacted? Your family? Who answered the call in an unexpected way? Why did it felt so right? What is the symbol that you keep from this day? What is the heirloom that you keep from before this day? What was the big event in the news this day? What was your « ahah » moment? Who were the few people that did get it at this time? What was the first thing that you lost?
  81. 81. VISION Meeting the mentor Crossing the threshold CONFLICT Ordinary World Call to adventure Refusal of the call RESOLUTION The road back Resurrection Return with elixir The Storyboard 3/4 STRUGGLE Test, allies, ennemies Reward, Ordeal The belly of the whale What were the first difficulties you met? What were people were saying when they were mocking you? What did you manage to do right away? What was their specific role? Who was part of the first team you build around you? How did they start to fight you? What was your way of defending yourself? How much time did you loose? Did you lost customers other these fights? What was the lowest point of the adventure? How desperate were you? What nearly decided you to stop everything? What was the worst symptom? Why did the last of your supports eventually failed you? Who were the toughest opponents? Why did they thought your success unlikely? Who else came on board after the first successes? Who got irritated by these successes? What kind of confusion did it generate on the market?
  82. 82. VISION Meeting the mentor Crossing the threshold CONFLICT Ordinary World Call to adventure Refusal of the call STRUGGLE Test, allies, ennemies Reward, Ordeal The belly of the whale The Storyboard 4/4 RESOLUTION The road back Resurrection Return with elixir ☺ How did you realized you were saved? Who were the first to understand you made it? Eventually what saved you? How did it started to take off? What are the things still irritating you? How has the world changed now? What did people started to say about you? How did you broadcast it? How did you had to adjust your life ? What was the symbol of the success? What kind of unexpected and « fun » difficulties did you met then? All in all, what did work best that you didn’t see coming? What are the little things about success that are the most important to you? What are you old competitors doing now? How would you do it differently now? What are the things you had to let go? What is the symbol of your past that you still look upon sometimes?
  83. 83. « I paint things not as they look, but as I see them » Pablo PICASSO

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