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Good for What?
Teaching Sources for Sustainable
Lifelong Information Literacy
Meredith Farkas, Portland Community College
...
What?
So What?
Now What?
BEAM me up!
Meredith Farkas
Portland Community College
ACRL 2015
Freshman Inquiry Assessment
Project
 FRINQ = a year long GenEd class focused on writing,
critical thinking, quantitative ...
Our questions:
 How clearly do students define their research question or
thesis?
 How well do students integrate outsid...
Big takeaways
 Students didn’t seem to understand the purpose of
sources in research
 Poorly integrated
 Many summarize...
Do students really know what
to do with the sources they’ve
found?
Do they know what they’re
looking for in the first plac...
“Students… think of research as
going to the library or the Web to
find articles to support a pre-
determined thesis.”
Bea...
Sources ≠ Requirement to be
met
Sources = Evidence
Choose a topic
Ask a
research
question
Search for Sources
Think about
What Evidence
is Needed
Search for
Sources
What we s...
How do librarians typically classify
sources when explaining them to
students?
We tend to focus on how they’re
made rather than how they
can be used
BEAM Model
Bizup, Joseph. "BEAM: A rhetorical vocabulary for teaching
research-based writing." Rhetoric Review 27.1 (2008)...
BEAM Model
“If we want students to adopt a rhetorical
perspective towards research-based writing
then we should use langua...
BEAM Model
 B = Background
 E = Exhibit
 A = Argument
 M = Method
“Writers rely on background sources, interpret or an...
B = Background
 Provides you with
context and big
picture.
 Generally books
and reference
works.
E = Exhibit
 Used to explain,
illustrate, analyze or
interpret
 Usually are primary
sources, primary data,
etc.
A = Argument
 Used to strengthen, refine,
or complicate an argument
 Written by experts (books
or articles)
M = Method
 An idea, framework, or
lens that informs your
analysis
 Can be an
experimental
approach, a theoretical
persp...
And when students are thinking
about their sources
rhetorically….
Teaching BEAM
Activities for the Classroom
 Have students list the sorts of evidence they think would be
useful for their research usin...
Know Your Sources
using infographics to inspire complex thinking
Sara Robertson Seely
Portland Community College
ACRL 2015
WR 121 & WR 122
course outcomes
“Locate, evaluate and use
information effectively and
ethically...”
“Evaluate source mater...
source selection assessment
winter 2013
over 200 student responses
at least 38 WR121 & WR 122 courses
~20% response rate
key finding
Students who made 2 or more different types of considerations
were significantly more likely to select the bes...
complexity
goodbad
currency
authorship
authority
editorial process
audience
visual
explanation
communicates
significance
displays data
fixed medium
Ashley Downs, MS
Graduate Student Intern
Syracuse University’s
School of Information
Assistant Librarian
Mann Library
Corn...
tweets
blogs
online videos
newspapers
magazines
prof. journals
scholarly
journals
academic
books
encyclopedias
volume
time in review
number of
reviewers
author
education
number of
authors
jargon
specialized
vocabulary
assumed
knowledge
Engaging students
close reading
explain to peers
-what makes this worth considering?
-what does it make you think about?
-...
Engaging students
timeline activity
search activity
-places sources in conversation
-visualizes iteration of information
-...
Links
to Know Your Sources
pcc.edu/library/know-your-sources
to activity
http://bit.ly/knowyoursourcesactivity
to slides
h...
Images
Alby, James. “Pop shuv-tail.” Flickr.com 20 Feb 2009.
https://flic.kr/p/62g7YD
dwstucke. “Blueberry Bucket.” Flickr...
Images, cont.
Farr, Nick. “Bucket.” Flickr.com 4 Jan. 2008
https://flic.kr/p/4iqGvK
zabisco. “Watch this space: Infographi...
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy
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Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy

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Presentation by Anne-Marie Deitering, Meredith Farkas, and Sara Seely for ACRL 2015.

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Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy

  1. 1. Good for What? Teaching Sources for Sustainable Lifelong Information Literacy Meredith Farkas, Portland Community College Sara Seely, Portland Community College Anne-Marie Deitering, Oregon State University 26 March 2015ACRL 2015 Portland, Oregon
  2. 2. What? So What? Now What?
  3. 3. BEAM me up! Meredith Farkas Portland Community College ACRL 2015
  4. 4. Freshman Inquiry Assessment Project  FRINQ = a year long GenEd class focused on writing, critical thinking, quantitative literacy, diversity, and ethics and social responsibility  The library has a close relationship with the program  Students create ePortfolios  Assessed for critical thinking and writing already
  5. 5. Our questions:  How clearly do students define their research question or thesis?  How well do students integrate outside information into their paper and attribute it?  Do students use relevant sources?  Do students use authoritative sources?
  6. 6. Big takeaways  Students didn’t seem to understand the purpose of sources in research  Poorly integrated  Many summarized sources and didn’t use to bolster argument or illustrate point  Sources often not relevant to the topic  Seemed forced in to meet a requirement  We felt that “sources” wasn’t meaningful to students
  7. 7. Do students really know what to do with the sources they’ve found? Do they know what they’re looking for in the first place?
  8. 8. “Students… think of research as going to the library or the Web to find articles to support a pre- determined thesis.” Bean, John. “Backward Design: Towards and Effective Model of Staff Development in Writing in the Disciplines.” In Writing in the Disciplines. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
  9. 9. Sources ≠ Requirement to be met
  10. 10. Sources = Evidence
  11. 11. Choose a topic Ask a research question Search for Sources Think about What Evidence is Needed Search for Sources What we see What we’d like to see
  12. 12. How do librarians typically classify sources when explaining them to students?
  13. 13. We tend to focus on how they’re made rather than how they can be used
  14. 14. BEAM Model Bizup, Joseph. "BEAM: A rhetorical vocabulary for teaching research-based writing." Rhetoric Review 27.1 (2008): 72- 86.
  15. 15. BEAM Model “If we want students to adopt a rhetorical perspective towards research-based writing then we should use language that focuses their attention not on what their sources and other material are… but on what they as writers might do with them.” -Joseph Bizup, “BEAM: A rhetorical vocabulary…”
  16. 16. BEAM Model  B = Background  E = Exhibit  A = Argument  M = Method “Writers rely on background sources, interpret or analyze exhibits, engage arguments, and follow methods.”
  17. 17. B = Background  Provides you with context and big picture.  Generally books and reference works.
  18. 18. E = Exhibit  Used to explain, illustrate, analyze or interpret  Usually are primary sources, primary data, etc.
  19. 19. A = Argument  Used to strengthen, refine, or complicate an argument  Written by experts (books or articles)
  20. 20. M = Method  An idea, framework, or lens that informs your analysis  Can be an experimental approach, a theoretical perspective, etc.
  21. 21. And when students are thinking about their sources rhetorically….
  22. 22. Teaching BEAM
  23. 23. Activities for the Classroom  Have students list the sorts of evidence they think would be useful for their research using at least 2 or 3 of the categories in BEAM  Students who already have found sources: consider how they plan to use each one using the rhetorical vocabulary of BEAM  Reading an article to see how the author uses sources based on BEAM  Have students evaluate sources for authority based on how their intended use in the BEAM model  Your ideas?
  24. 24. Know Your Sources using infographics to inspire complex thinking Sara Robertson Seely Portland Community College ACRL 2015
  25. 25. WR 121 & WR 122 course outcomes “Locate, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically...” “Evaluate source materials for authority, currency, reliability, sound reasoning and validity of evidence.” curiosity What considerations do students make when describing why they select one source over another? What do students value in a source?
  26. 26. source selection assessment winter 2013 over 200 student responses at least 38 WR121 & WR 122 courses ~20% response rate
  27. 27. key finding Students who made 2 or more different types of considerations were significantly more likely to select the best source.
  28. 28. complexity
  29. 29. goodbad
  30. 30. currency authorship authority editorial process audience
  31. 31. visual explanation communicates significance displays data fixed medium
  32. 32. Ashley Downs, MS Graduate Student Intern Syracuse University’s School of Information Assistant Librarian Mann Library Cornell University Andrew Grewell Student Intern Portland Community College’s Graphic Design Program Front-End Developer Provata Health Portland, OR
  33. 33. tweets blogs online videos newspapers magazines prof. journals scholarly journals academic books encyclopedias
  34. 34. volume
  35. 35. time in review number of reviewers
  36. 36. author education number of authors
  37. 37. jargon specialized vocabulary assumed knowledge
  38. 38. Engaging students close reading explain to peers -what makes this worth considering? -what does it make you think about? -what’s problematic or not represented?
  39. 39. Engaging students timeline activity search activity -places sources in conversation -visualizes iteration of information -emphasis on access
  40. 40. Links to Know Your Sources pcc.edu/library/know-your-sources to activity http://bit.ly/knowyoursourcesactivity to slides http://bit.ly/knowyoursourcesslides
  41. 41. Images Alby, James. “Pop shuv-tail.” Flickr.com 20 Feb 2009. https://flic.kr/p/62g7YD dwstucke. “Blueberry Bucket.” Flickr.com 1 Sept. 2006 https://flic.kr/p/nw49W Estelle, Travis. “Deschutes Brewery and Public House.” Flickr.com 26 Mar 2013 https://flic.kr/p/e92ULq
  42. 42. Images, cont. Farr, Nick. “Bucket.” Flickr.com 4 Jan. 2008 https://flic.kr/p/4iqGvK zabisco. “Watch this space: Infographics are IN.” July 2011 http://ceblog.s3.amazonaws.com/wp- content/uploads/2013/04/Infographic-of-infographics.jpg

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