Mfa syllabi

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Mfa syllabi

  1. 1. Full Subject SyllabiCTV 7010 Postgraduate Film and Video Production INumber of Units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 1, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. CHANG Lok Yee George, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesThis course is designed to immerse students in all aspects of Film/Video productions. Students will be divided into smaller groups tocome up with ideas and develop them into shooting scripts. They will then learn to do pre-production work and execute theproduction using film/video as a form of expression. During production, students will learn the art of directing, acting, cinematographyand lighting, audio recording and art direction from various faculty members or professional staff. Towards the last few weeks of thesemester, students will also learn the basic of post-production techniques using various computer soft wares such as Avid, Protoolsand Quantel Edit Box to add finishing touches to the project.Learning OutcomesEach student will finish an individual narrative short film project on film. The film will be shot in 16mm film stock with sync soundrecording. The film work print will be edited on Steenbeck and get first answer print as the final project. The maximum length isstrictly set at 8 minutes.Contents1. Developing an idea from various sources1.1 From daily news1.2 From short stories1.3 From visual materials1.4 From audio materials1.5 From personal diaries2. Developing the idea into a script form2.1 Researching on plot and character development2.1 Developing the idea into a story2.2 Developing the idea into a shooting script2.3 Developing the idea into a story board3. Pre-production3.1 Selecting a format: film/video3.2 Production design3.3 Location scouting4. Production4.1 Rehearsing a scene with actors4.2 Setting up lighting for master scene and close ups4.3 Rehearsing camera movement
  2. 2. 4.4 On location audio recording5. Post production5.1 Editing footage on computer5.2 Studio audio recording5.3 Mixing audioModes of TuitionSeminar discussion, lectures, workshop and exercisesAssessmentSeminar Presentation of creative concept 30%Term Project 70%Reference BooksAmerican Cinematographer Video Manual Third Edition. ASC PressAmerican Cinematographer Film Manual 8th Edition. ASC PressKatz , S.D. (1991). Film directing shot by shot: visualizing from concept to screen. Studio City CA: Michael Wiese Productions inconjunction with Focal Press.Proferes, N.T. (2001). Film directing fundamentals: from script to screen.Boston: Focal Press.Schaefer, D. and Salvato, L. (1984). Masters of Lights: conversations with contemporary cinematographers. University of CaliforniaPress.Writer of Light: The Cinematography of Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC. ASC PressVideo ReferencesLights Keeps Me CompanyVisions of Lights-The Art of CinematographyCTV 7020 Postgraduate Television Studio Production INumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 1, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. AU David, Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Mr. John FERRETTIObjectivesTo enhance students critical responsibilities as required for the complex task of TV directing. This studio workshop providesstudents with intensive hands-on experience in the advanced techniques of multi-camera television production - including theequipment involved, the personnel and their functions, and decision-making procedures that constitute the producing and directing avariety of multi-camera TV programs. The course aims to develop students ability to carry out the various phases in the production ofa television package at an advanced level. Students gain extensive operation experience in a television studio environment with
  3. 3. evaluations of their work by the instructors.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Understand the making of TV magazines, variety shows, musicals, and drama series.2. Be able to acquire at least the skills and knowledge to make a 3-5 minutes TV drama.Contents1. Television Formats1.1 Magazine shows1.2 News and current affairs1.3 Music shows1.4 Studio dramas1.5 Variety shows2. Sources for Ideas2.1 Standard script layouts2.2 "Fully scripted" versus "semi-scripted" show3. The Television Director3.1 Duties of a television director3.2 Characteristics of a good director4. The Television Camera4.1 The camera chain4.2 Studio lens4.3 ENG/EEP cameras and camcorders5. Camera Operation5.1 Electronic and operational characteristics5.2 Zoom control5.3 Focus control6. Picture Composition6.1 Screen size6.2 Screen motion6.3 Field of view6.4 Depth7 Television Lighting Fixtures7.1 Studio lighting instruments7.2 Field lighting instruments7.3 Lighting control equipment8 Studio Lighting Principles8.1 Perception and selection8.2 Light quality and direction8.3 Lighting people and groups9 Production Switchers
  4. 4. 9.1 Types and functions9.2 Switcher layout9.3 Switcher operation9.4 Vision mixing techniques10 Instantaneous Editing10.1 Rules of editing10.2 Editing functions10.3 Transition devices11 Audio Equipment in TV Studio11.1 Electronic and operational characteristics of microphones11.2 Audio console11.3 Sound fidelity12 Video Recording and Playback Systems12.1 Tape-based recording systems12.2 Disk-based recording system12.3 Automated playback systems13 Multi-camera Studio Directing13.1 Directors command13.2 Directing from control room13.3 Rehearsals13.4 Timing control14 Electronic Visual Effects14.1 Standard analog video effects14.2 Digital video effects14.3 Mechanical effects15 Postproduction Editing15.1 Off-line versus on-line15.2 Linear versus non-linear editing systems15.3 AB-Roll editing15.4 Control track and time-code editingMode of TuitionWorkshops, demonstration, and projectsAssessmentTelevision Field production 20%Television variety show 30%Studio drama production 50%ReferencesCury, I. (1998). Directing & Producing for Television: A Format Approach. London: Focal Press.Goodridge. M. (2002). Directing (Screencraft Series). London: Focal Press.
  5. 5. Millerson, G. (1999). Lighting for Television and Film. London: Focal PressWard, P. (2000). TV Technical Operations: An Introduction. London: Focal Press.Whitaker, J. (2002). Master Handbook of Video Porduction. McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing.Zettl, H. (1998). Sight, Sound, Motion?: Applied Media Aesthetics(3rd edition) Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing.CTV 7030 2-D Computer Graphics WorkshopNumber of units : 3 units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 1, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. MAN Chi WahObjectivesThis intermediate level course is designed to explore the concepts, issues and techniques of 2-D computer graphics from both anacademic and studio perspective. Both technical and aesthetic issues will be addressed. Aesthetic issues will encompass concepts,composition and historical context. Technical topics will include raster and vector imaging, scanning, image manipulation,retouching, printing, motion graphics, and other related topics. The Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe After Effectssoftware packages will be used to illustrate the principles and techniques and to produce the projects.This course is a studio course, which means that the emphasis is on the production of students artwork and not on the software.Students themselves will be determining the nature of the imagery they produce. They should strive to create try and incorporate thework they do in the workshop into their larger body of work. There will be periodic technical demonstrations and explanations duringclass time, but for the most part, students will be expected to work independently in learning the details of the various softwarepackages we used. They should spend time practicing, as well as reading reference books.The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include in-class critiques, exercises, and work sessions. Thecritiques will be run as seminar-style discussions, with everyone participating in the critiques and discussions of each students work.Because of the way the classes are run, attendance at and active participation in the weekly classes is considered very importantand is considered in grade calculations.Learning OutcomesSuccessful students will be able to:1. Have a knowledge and understanding of leading-edge computer graphics as applied to the 2D CG medium.2. Have a knowledge and understanding of the technology behind the latest generation of computer graphics.3. Have thorough command of the practice of research, and the ability use and adapt information to specific projects.4. Have a broad knowledge of the practice, theory and history of the topic.5. Articulate a personal aesthetic.6. Interpret design presentations (drawings, plans, schematics) to assist in developing a work.7. Participate in and productively respond to critique of work.8. Contribute to a team, as well as assume leadership responsibilities9. Demonstrate a competency for formal art and design elements, composition, and craftsmanship through the handling of various2D CG programs.10. Employ strong oral and visual communication skills.
  6. 6. 11. Demonstrate a strong and consistent work ethic.12. Articulate and contribute their learning process in future endeavors.Contents1. General Perspectives1.1 Nature of the medium1.2 Fundamental concepts1.3 History and background of computer graphics1.4 Key issues1.5 Resource and research1.6 Anatomy of the programs1.7 Digital aesthetics2. Raster Graphics / Bitmapped Graphics2.1 Introduction and concepts2.2 Limits and strengths2.3 Principles and structures2.4 Scanning and correction2.5 Color systems, spaces, and matching2.6 Drawing and painting2.7 Masking and layering2.8 Import and export2.9 Algorithmic touch and special effects2.10 Output issues3. Vector Graphics / Object Oriented Graphics3.1 Introduction and concepts3.2 Geometry and the nature of selection3.3 Definition of lines and fills3.4 Local and global touch tools3.5 Boolean operations: adding and subtracting shapes3.6 Typography and design3.7 Inter-program file exchange4. Moving 2-D computer graphics4.1 Keyframing and inbetweening4.2 Precomposing and nesting composition4.3 Timing factors4.4 Play with the parameters4.5 Straight and premultiplied alpha4.6 Track matte4.7 Special effects on time-based production5. Composition Issues5.1 Elements of composition5.2 Style and originality
  7. 7. 5.3 Visual Consistency5.4 Placements of elements5.5 File size, resolution, and color depth5.6 Scale and other transformations5.7 Layers and channels5.8 Combining digital and traditional techniquesMode of TuitionLectures, tutorial, critical appreciations, and workshopAssessmentParticipation 20%(The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include numerous in-class exercises. Because of this,attendance at and participation in the weekly classes is considered extremely important and is considered in grading calculations)Assignments 40%(2 Assignments, one on raster graphics and the other on vector graphics)Final Project 40%(A 2d moving image project with the combination of vector and raster graphics)ReferencesSplater, A. M. (2nd ed) (1999). The Computer in the Visual Arts. California: Addison WesleyLovejoy, M. (1997). Postmodern Currents: Art and Artists in the Age of Electronic Media. New Jersey: Prentice HallKewlow, I.V. (2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics for Designers and artists. New York: Van Nostrand ReinholdFoley, J. Dam, A. Feiner, S. and Hughes, J. (ED 2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics, Principles and Practice. California: AddisonWesleyMeyer, T. and Meyer, C. (ED) (2000). Creating Motion Graphics with After Effects. California: CMP BooksWeinmann, E. (2002). Illustrator 10 for Windows and Macintosh: Visual QuickStart Guide. California: Peachpit PressAdobe Creative Team. (ED) (2002). Adobe Photoshop 7.0: Classroom in a Book. California: Adobe PressCTV 7040 Postgraduate Film and Video Production IINumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7010 Postgraduate Film and Video Production ILevel : Year 1, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner/Instructor : Mr. CHANG Lok Yee George, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesThis course is an advances course designed to immerse students in all aspects of Film/Video productions. Students will be dividedinto smaller groups to develop idea for a film/video shooting script and execute the production using film/video as a form ofexpression. During production, students will learn advanced methods on the art of directing, acting, cinematography and lighting,audio recording and art direction from various faculty members or professionals. Towards the end of the semester, students will learn
  8. 8. the basics of post-production techniques using various computer softwares such as Avid, Protools and Quantel Edit Box to addfinishing touches to the project.Learning OutcomesEach student will finish an individual narrative short film project on video. The film has to be shot in 16mm film stock with sync soundrecording. The film will be Telecine into Beta SP through laboratory and edited on non-linear editing system. The finish project will beon Beta SP format. The maximum length is strictly set at 15 minutes.Contents1. Developing an idea from various sources1.1 From daily news1.2 From short stories1.3 From visual materials1.4 From audio materials1.5 From personal diaries2. Developing the idea into a script form2.1 Researching on plot and character development2.2 Developing the idea into a story2.3 Developing the idea into a shooting script2.4 Developing the idea into a story board3. Pre-production3.1 Selecting a format: film/video3.2 Production design3.3 Location scouting4. Production4.1 Rehearsing a scene with actors4.2 Setting up lighting for master scene and close ups4.3 Rehearsing camera movement4.4 On location audio recording5. Post production5.1 Editing footage on computer5.2 Studio audio recording5.3 Mixing audioModes of TuitionSeminar discussion, lectures, workshop and projectsAssessmentSeminar Presentation of creative concept 30%Term Project 70%Reference BooksAndrzej, W. (1992). Wajda on Film: Masters on Film .
  9. 9. David, M. (1991). On directing Film. Faber & Faber.Wenders, W. (1991). The Logic of Images: Essays and Conversations. Faber & Faber.Proferes, N.T. (2001). Film directing fundamentals: from script to screen.Boston: Focal Press.Katz, S.D. (1991). Film directing shot by shot: visualizing from concept to screen. Studio City CA: Michael Wiese Productions inconjunction with Focal Press.American Cinematographer Video Manual Third Edition. ASC PressAmerican Cinematographer Film Manual 8th Edition . ASC PressSchaefer , D. and Salvato, L. (1984). Masters of Lights: conversations with contemporary cinematographers. University of CaliforniaPress.Reflections: 21 Cinematographers at Work by Benjamin Bergery.Writer of Light: The Cinematography of Vittorio Storaro, ASC, AIC. ASC PressVideo ReferencesLights Keeps Me CompanyVisions of Lights-The Art of CinematographyKodak Series on CinematographyCTV 7050 Postgraduate Television Studio Production IINumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7020 Postgraduate TV Studio Production ILevel : Year 1, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. AU David, Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Mr. John FERRETTIObjectivesThis advanced studio workshop provides background knowledge, theory, and instruction in the practical skills required for producingtelevision programs of professional standard. In addition to acquiring more useful information about the technical, logistical, andaesthetic aspects of television production, the workshop aims to develop a better understanding of the thorough preparationnecessary for an effective production and heightened awareness of the need for harmonious collaboration on the televisionproduction team. Emphasis is placed on the directors pre-production, planning, organization and execution of a multi-cameraprogram under time-constrained studio conditions.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Be able to make a ten minutes TV studio drama2. Be familiarized with TV studio production techniques like lighting, sound and story telling.Contents1. Craft of Multi-camera Directing1.1 Communication skills
  10. 10. 1.2 Working with the production team2. Support Staff2.1 Floor manager2.2 Producer assistant2.3 Lighting director2.4 Audio director3. Performance Techniques3.1 Performer and camera3.2 Performer and audio3.3 Performer and Timing4. Acting Techniques4.1 Director/talent relationship4.2 Acting styles and techniques4.3 Blocking and character development4.4 Timing and pace5. Advanced Camera Techniques5.1 Image control5.2 Cameras positioning5.3 Camera and lens movements6. Studio Lighting Approaches6.1 Systematic lighting6.2 Look and light method6.3 Plot and light method7. Lighting Styles7.1 Pictorial style7.2 National lighting7.3 Decorative lighting7.4 Animated lighting8. Creative Video Effects8.1 Static versus moving video effects8.2 Virtual studios8.3 Chroma keying9. Audio Technical Operations9.1 Television sound9.2 Advanced audio setup9.3 Control and monitoring10. Production Design10.1 Graphics equipment10.2 Scenery and properties10.3 The floor plan11. Makeup and Costume Design11.1 Materials
  11. 11. 11.2 Technical requirement12. Dealing with Problems12.1 Live television12.2 Technical disaster12.3 Machine breakdown12.4 Production errors13. Digital Television13.1 Analog versus Digital Television13.2 Differences between analog and digital13.3 Benefits of digital television13.4 Aspects Ratio and scanning systems14. Reflections on Future Technology14.1 Consumer trends14.2 Studio engineering14.3 Satellites and microwavesMode of TuitionWorkshops, demonstrations, and projectsAssessmentStudio drama production 1 40%Studio drama production 2 60%ReferencesBarlett, E.R. (1990). Cable television technology and operations. New York: McGraw-Hill.Cury, I. (1998). Directing & Producing for Television: A Format Approach. London: Focal Press.Goodridge, M. (2002). Directing (Screencraft Series). London: Focal Press.Millerson, G. (1999). Lighting for television and Film. London: Focal PressWard, P. (2000). TV Technical Operations: An Introduction. London: Focal Press.Whitaker, J. (2002). Master Handbook of Video Production. McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing.CTV 7060 3-D Modeling and Rendering WorkshopNumber of units : 3 units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7030 2-D Computer Graphics WorkshopLevel : Year 1, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. MAN Chi WahObjectivesThis course focuses on the concepts, issues and techniques of 3-D computer modeling and rendering as they apply to the animationart. Both technical and aesthetic issues will be addressed. Aesthetic issues will encompass concept, composition and historical
  12. 12. context. Technical topics will include global and local coordinate systems, primitives, organic and polygon modeling, modelingtechniques, hierarchical structure, lighting, camera setting, texture mapping, and rendering. The Alias|Wavefront Maya softwarepackage will be used to illustrate the principles and techniques dealt with and to produce the assignments.The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include in-class exercises. Because of the way the classes arerun, attendance and active participation in the weekly classes are considered extremely important and are considered in evaluations.There will be four assignments. They will be evaluated based both on aesthetics and on technical proficiency.There will also be one written exam towards the end of the semester on the technical principles of 3-D computer modeling andrendering.Successful completion of this course should provide students with an all-rounded understanding of the principles and operation of3-D modeling and rendering tools. It paves the way for students to take the 3-D animation workshops later.Learning OutcomesSuccessful students will typically be able to:1. Have a knowledge and understanding of leading-edge computer graphics as applied to the 3d computer graphics medium.2. Have a knowledge and understanding of the technology behind the latest generation of 3d computer graphics.3. Determine their own modeling method that they feel most comfortable.4. Implement standard modeling and rendering techniques.5. Think creatively, make decisions and apply problem solving skills.6. Communicate their ideas and understand the working pipeline.7. Use their imagination and translate ideas into action.8. Gain an understanding of the principle of 3d modeling and rendering.9. Gain an understanding of the principle of lighting.10. Participate in and productively respond to critique of work.11. Articulate a personal aesthetic.12. Demonstrate a strong and consistent work ethic.13. Identify the available career opportunities, and describe the roles of people employed in environments that use or create 3Dcomputer graphics.Contents1. General Perspectives1.1 Nature of the medium1.2 How modeling is related to rendering, and animation1.3 Key issues1.4 Resource and research1.5 Application of 3d CG1.5.1 Animation: simple keyframing1.5.2 Industrial design: sculpture: cad / cam1.5.3 Print media: color and resolution1.5.4 VRML2. Modeling2.1 Introduction and concepts2.1.1 Space, objects, and structure
  13. 13. 2.1.2 Points, lines, and surfaces2.1.3 Importance of naming objects2.1.4 Absolute and relative values2.1.5 File formats for modeling2.2 Primitives2.3 Coordinate systems: local and global2.4 Transformations2.5 Organic and polygon modeling2.6 Modeling Techniques2.6.1. Freeform curved surface2.6.2 Extrusions, lofts, boundaries2.6.3 Duplicating and mirroring2.6.4 Beveling, rounding, and fillets2.6.5 Boolean operations and trims2.6.6 Deformed and randomized surfaces2.7 Construction history2.8 Hierarchical structure2.9 Image plane setup2.10 On overmodeling2.11 Take advantage of modeling mistakes3. Texturing and Rendering3.1 Lights and Camera3.1.1 Lighting: directional, point, spot, and ambient3.1.2 Location, intensity, color, and falloff3.1.3 Light linking in geometry heavy scenes3.1.4 Cast shadows: depth map / Z map3.1.5 Defining a camera3.1.6 Camera moves, field of view3.1.7 Background images3.2 Shading algorithms and hypershade3.3 Image mapping and projection methods3.4 Surface reflectivity3.5 Surface texture3.5.1 2-D textures and common attributes3.5.2 Controlling bump and displacement maps3.5.3 3-D procedural texture maps3.5.4 Paint texture tools3.6 Environments - sky, cubic, spherical3.7 Resolution and file formats for image output3.8 Raytracing3.9 Rendering in layers3.10 Composting
  14. 14. 4. Aesthetic Issues4.1 Style and originality4.2 Final frame consideration4.3 Center of interest4.4 Color and emotion4.5 Harmony and rhythm4.6 Experimenting use of the media4.7 Composition: understanding its relationship in order to make the image reach its goalMode of TuitionLectures, tutorial, critical appreciations, and workshopAssessmentParticipation 20%(The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include numerous in-class exercises. Because of this,attendance at and participation in the weekly classes is considered extremely important and is considered in grading calculations)Assignments 60%(On nurbs, polygon and subdivision surfaces with emphases on craftsmanship, originality and mood)Written Examination 20%(Text book: ORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & Company- only chapters on modeling, texture mapping and lighting)ReferencesORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & CompanyKerlow, I. (3rd ed) (2003). The Art of 3-D Computer Animation and Effects. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.Kerlow, I. (2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics for Designers and artists. New York: Van Nostrand ReinholdFoley, J. Dam, A. Feiner, S. and Hughes, J. (ED 2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics, Principles and Practice. California: AddisonWesleyhttp://www.alias.com/eng/index.shtmlhttp://www.highend3d.com/maya/tutorialshttp://www.3dcafe.comhttp://www.3dlinks.comCTV 7070 Media ManagementNumber of Units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 3Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak TongObjectives
  15. 15. This seminar aims to establish a firm foundation of business and management skills for specialized career training in the mediaindustry. The roles and skills of a media producer are examined, and the proper procedures for production management from projectinitiation to completion are analyzed in detail.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Understand the complications of film and TV series production; including distribution and marketing operations mechanisms.2. Understand that the investment portfolio is not a single country investment, but rather a pool of resources from a many countries.Contents1. The Producer and Script1.1 Roles and types of producer1.2 The writer-producer1.3 Script sales strategies2. Marketable Concepts2.1 Idea generation2.2 Packages2.3 Audience Assessment3. Production Management3.1 Script breakdown3.2 Scheduling3.3 Estimating and Budgeting3.4 Production meetings3.5 Casting4. The Deal4.1 Entertainment lawyer4.2 Distribution Agreement4.3 Talent Agent5. Economics of Distribution and Exhibition5.1 Network television5.2 Local television5.3 Cable television5.4 VCD and DVD markets5.5 Internet6. Technology of Distribution and Exhibition6.1 Digital Broadcasting and HDTV6.2 Satellite, cable and web6.3 Conventional and digital film projection6.4 Other digital formats7. Marketing7.1 Publicity7.2 Previews
  16. 16. 7.3 Release dates7.4 Distributors8. Financing8.1 The bank and financing8.2 pre-sales8.3 Foreign distribution8.4 Co-productions and foreign tax deals8.5 Production Accounting9. Entertainment Law9.1 Legal considerations9.2 Agents, negotiations and contracts9.3 Ethnographic documentary10. Copyright and RoyaltiesMode of TuitionLectures, discussions, presentations and projectsAssessmentPresentation 40%Final Research Paper 60%ReferencesBernstein, S. (1998). The technique of film production. London: Focal Press.Curran, T. (1986). Financing your film: A guide for independent filmmakers and producers. New York: Praeger.Czech, B. (1991). Managing electronic media. London: Focal Press.Horwin, G. (1990). Careers in film and video production. London: Focal Press.Houghton, B. (1991). What a producer does. Hollywood: Silman James Press.Puttnam, D. (1997). The struggle for control of the words film industry. London: Harper CollinsPublisher.Rosenthal, A. (1995). Writing docudrama: Dramatizing reality for film and TV. Newton, MA:Butterwoth- Heinemann Focal Press.Ross, D. (1997). Triangle: Writing, producing and directing. Munich: Hochschule Fur Fernschen and Film.Randall, D. (1991). Feature films on a low budget. London: Focal Press.Singleton, R. S. (1986). Film scheduling/film budgeting. Beverly Hills, California: Lone Eagle.Whannel, G. (1992). Fields in vision. London: Routledge.CTV 7081 MFA Thesis Project INumber of units : 3 UnitsPrerequisite : Year 3 standingLevel : Year 3, semester 1Planner : Dr. LO Wai Luk, Ms. ZHANG Weimin
  17. 17. CTV 7082 MFA Thesis Project IINumber of units : 6 UnitsPrerequisite : Year 3 standingLevel : Year 3, semester 2Planner : Dr. LO Wai Luk, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesThis year-long subject engages the student in supervised independent production or creative work. On the first Monday of May andDecember each year, the student writes and submits a proposal to the Course Management Committee. A chief adviser is assignedto the student upon approval of the proposal. For details please refer to SECTION III 3.2 of this Course Document, and theProduction Handbook for the MFA Thesis Projects.Learning OutcomesEach student is required to plan, shoot and edit a 25-30 minutes film/video in which the student and faculty work together addressingthe myriad aesthetic, technical, collaborative and ethical issues integral to filmmaking. The maximum length is strictly set at 30minutes from first to last frame of picture not including titles.CTV 7100 Postgraduate Script WritingNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. LO Wai LukObjectivesThis is an intensive writing class. Through different writing assignments, basic narrative elements of story, plot, character, action,continuity, rhythm, ellipses and dialogue will be thoroughly reviewed.Learning OutcomesThe students will develop advanced writing techniques for writing different kinds of scripts in different contexts or environments. Eachstudent will be able to work independently on the final creative project, a script of at least one-hour.Contents1. The Idea of Drama1.1 Dramatic action1.2 Dramatic structure1.3 Dramatic form2. Emotional Rhythm2.1 Emotional Structure
  18. 18. 2.2 The Flow of drama vs. "qi"3. Scene3.1 The nature of scene3.2 The interplay between Scene and Act3.3 Scene description4. Character4.1 How to create a character bank4.2 Research on people4.3 Theory of Personality Types5. Analysis of Verbal Expression5.1 Literary and Dramatic Writings Compared5.2 Verbal Expression and Visual Expression5.3 The monologue as applied on stage and in film/TV5.4 Commentary as narrative6. Writing with audio and visual implication7. Adaptation8. Research of Creative WritingsMode of TuitionLectures, seminar, discussionsAssessmentAssignment 20%Presentation 20%Term Project 60%ReferencesAristotle. Poetics.Axelrod, Mark. (2001). Aspects of the Screenplay: Techniques of Screenwriting. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.Chatman Seymour (1978). Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University.Egri, Lajos. (1960). The Art of Dramatic Writing: Its Basis in the Creative Interpretation of Human Motives. New York: Simon andSchuster.Lee, Lance. (2000). A Poetics for Screenwriters. Austin: University of Texas.McKee, Robert. (1997). Story: Substance, Structure, Style, and the Principles of Screenwriting. New York: Regan Books.Pfister, M. (1991). The Theory and Analysis of Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University.CTV 7110 Advanced Script Writing WorkshopNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hours
  19. 19. Planner : Dr. LO Wai LukObjectivesThe students will undergo the creative process of a full script and share with fellow scriptwriters all the fear and joy of creation. Theteacher will be more of a facilitator than an instructor. The emphasis will be on the originality, aesthetics, and creative integrity.Learning OutcomesAt the end of the subject, each student will finish a half hour script that is ready for production.Contents1. Different Forms of Script1.1 Screen Play1.2 Short Film1.3 Teleplay Play1.4 Radio Play1.5 Non-fictional script2. The Script Writing Process2.1 From Idea to Story2.2 Dramatic Action2.3 Screenplay Structure2.4 Scene Descriptions2.5 Narrative Treatment3. Character3.1 Aspects of good character3.2 Emotion expression3.3 Dialogue4. Writing the First Draft4.1 Set up4.2 Rising action4.3 Climax4.4 Falling action4.5 Story ending5. The Rewriting Process5.1 Constructive Feedback5.2 Rewriting and Polishing5.3 Restructuring the Story5.4 Rebuilding the characterMode of TuitionLectures, writing exercises, projects, seminarAssessment
  20. 20. Projects 60%Assignments 40%ReferencesBerman, Robert A. (1988). Fade In: The Screenwriting Process: A Concise Metho For Developing A Story Concept Into A FinishedScreenplay. California: Michael Wiese Film Productions.Bolker, Joan. (1997). The Writers Home Companion: An Anthology of the Worlds Best Writing Advice, from Keats to Kunitz. NewYork: Henry Holt and Company.Cooper, Pat and Ken Dancyger. (1994). Writing the Short Film. Boston: Focal Press.Dawson, Jonathan. (2000). Screenwriting: A Manual. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.Days, Ronald D. (1993). Screen Writing For Television and Film. Madison, Wisconsin: Brown & Benchmark Publishers.Engel, Joel ed. (1995). Screen Writers On Screen Writing. New York: Hyperion.Friedmann, Julian and Pere Roca. (1994). Writing Long-running Television Series. Mardid: Media Business School.Morley, John. (1992). Scriptwriting for Hing-impact Videos: Imaginative Approaches to Delivering Factual Information. Belmont,California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.Trapnell, Coles. (1966). Teleplay: An Introduction to Television Writing (Revised edition). New York: Hawthorn Books.Ueland, Brenda. (1987). If You Want to Write: A Book About Art, Independence and Spirit. Saint Paul: Graywolf Press.CTV 7120 Creativity WorkshopNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. LO Wai LukObjectivesCreativity is a habit, a choice. The class is a balance between survey of creativity and the practices of the enhancement of creativity.The first part is a seminar of several contemporary texts on Creativity. The students conduct the discussions themselves. Thesecond part is Creative Activity. This workshop stresses spontaneity, improvisation, participation, and most important of all,open-mindedness. The in-class activities includes: Creative problem solving, brainstorming, mind-mapping and drawing from theright side of the brain, free-writing, role-play…etc.Learning OutcomesAt the end of the subject, the students will develop creative habits to getting out of their routines, in their creative process, in theirapproach to subject matter, in their way of seeing, as well as in their attitude towards life. The students know how to employ valuabletools to expand their creativity, solve problems, eliminate creative blocks, and locate essential elements of any project.Contents1. What is Creativity?1.1 Working definitions1.2 Sharing of Cases of creative persons or creative acts
  21. 21. 1.3 All problems the student wants to solve2. Survey of Creativity2.1 James L. Adams, The Care and Feeding of Ideas2.2 Edward de Bono, Serious Creativity2.3 Mihaly Csikezentmihalyi, Creativity2.4 Howard Gardner, Creative Minds2.5 Anthony Storr, The Dynamics of Creation3. Practical Creativity Thinking Activities3.1 Creative problem solving3.2 Brainstorming3.3 Mind-mapping3.4 Free-writing3.5 Role-play4. Tools for Creativity4.1 Imagination and subconscious mind4.2 Attitude: positive, curiosity, passion4.3 Intuition4.4 Visualization and symbols4.5 Journaling5. The Creative Project5.1 The Creative Process5.2 Idea-finding5.3 Putting Ideas into Action5.4 Creation and Self-ActualizationMode of TuitionLectures, demonstrations, workshop, presentationAssessmentParticipation 20%Presentation 20%Journal 20%Project 40%ReferencesAdams, James. (1986). The Care & Feeding of Ideas: A Guide to Encouraging Creativity. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley.Amabile, T. (1989) Growing Up Creative: Nurturing a Lifetime of creativity NY: Crown 1989Barron, Frank et al ed. (1997). Creators on Creating. Tarcdher/Putnam.Boden, Margaret ed. (1994). Dimensions of Creativity. Cambridgbe Mass: MIT.Bono, Edward de. (1995). Serious Creativity: Using the Power of Lateral thinking to Creative New Ideas. London:HarperCollinsBusiness.-------. (1977). Textbook of Wisdom. Middlesex: Penguin.Bowden, Margaret, ed. (1994). Dimensions of Creativity. Cambridge Mass: MIT.
  22. 22. Buzan, T. (1993). Use Your Perfect Memory. PLUM, Penguin Group: NY.Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. (1990). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York: Harper and Row.-------. (1997). Findingt Flow. New York: Basic Books.Elias,M.& S.Tobias.(1990).Problem Solving and Decision Making. NEA Pub.: Washington D.C.Epstein, Robert. (1996). Cognition, Creativity and Behavior Westport. Conn: Praeger.Gardner, H. (1982). Art, Mind, And Brain: A Cognitive approach to creativity.-------. (1993). Multiple Intelligences: A Theory in Practice. New York: Basic Books._____ . (1997) Extraordinary Minds. New York: Harper Collins.Garnham, Alan. (1995). Thinking and Reasoning. Oxford UK: Blackwell.Goleman, Daniel et al. (1992). The Creative Spirit. New York: Dutton.Joas, Hans. (1996). The Creativity of Action. Chicago: University of Chicago.Li, Rex. (1996). A theory of conceptual Intelligence: thinking, learning creativity and giftedness. Westport : Praeger.Storr, Anthony. (1985). The Dynamics of Creation. New York: Atheneum.Simonton, Dean. (1997). Genius and Creativity. Greenwich Conn: Ablex.CTV 7130 Comedy: Theory and PracticeNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. LO Wai Luk, Dr. NG Chun BongObjectivesThis subject introduces students to essential theories of comedy, so they can apply them in discussions of a variety of genres, plays,films, jokes, comics etc. The students will select several cases to conduct in-depth studies. The creation and writing of comedy willbe the major activity of the second half of the class.Learning OutcomesSince learning and writing comedy are the most difficult among all creative subjects, after the course it is expected that the studentsshould:1. Understand the essential theories of comedy2. Develop a critical sense for studying different genres of comedy3. Develop comic sense and comic mind4. Learn how to develop comic ideas5. Learn how to write jokes and comic lines6. Acquire the basic technical skill in writing a script of comedyContents1. Comic Theory1.1 Henri Bergson, "Laughter"1.2 Sigmund Freud, "Wit and Its Relation to the Unconscious"
  23. 23. 1.4 Northrop Frye, "Anatomy of Criticism"1.5 Selections from the Chinese tradition2. Great Comic Drama2.1 Aristophanes, Lysistrata2.2 Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing2.3 關漢卿,《救風塵》3. Studies on Comic Film Makers3.1 Chaplin3.2 Fellini3.3 許冠文3.4 周星馳4. Other Forms4.1 TV situation comedy4.2 Musical4.3 Comics4.4 Jokes5. Comedy Project5.1 Happy Ideas5.2 Comic Action5.3 Comic Character5.4 Comic LogicMode of TuitionLectures, demonstrations, workshop, presentationAssessmentAssignment 40%Group Project 20%Final Individual Project 40%ReferencesBerger, Asa. (1997). The art of comedy writing. New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Pub.Charney, Maurice. (c1978). Comedy high and low: an introduction to the experience of comedy. New York : Oxford University Press.-------. (1978). Comedy : new perspectives. New York : New York Literary Forum.Corrigan, Robert W. ed. (1971). Comedy : a critical anthology. Boston : Houghton Mifflin.-------. (c1981). Comedy, meaning and form. New York : Harper & Row.Evans, James E. (1987). Comedy, an annotated bibliography of theory and criticism. Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow Press.Galligan, Edward L. (c1984). The comic vision in literature. Athens : University of Georgia Press.Glasgow, R.D.V. (c1999). The comedy of mind : philosophers stoned, or the pursuit of wisdom. Lanham : University Press ofAmerica.Hirst, David L. (1979). Comedy of manners. London : Methuen.Horton, Andrew ed. (1991). Comedy/Cinema/Theory. Berkeley: University of California.
  24. 24. Mast, Gerald. (1979). The comic mind : comedy and the movies. Chicago : University of Chicago Press.Nelson, T. G. A. (1990). Comedy : an introduction to comedy in literature, drama, and cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Palmer, D.J. ed. (1984). Comedy, developments in criticism : a casebook. Hampshire : Macmillan Education.Rickman, Gregg ed. (2001). The Film Comedy Reader. New York: Limelight Editions.Riehle, Wolfgand. (1990). Shakespeare, Plautus, and the humanist tradition. Suffolk : D.S. Brewer.Torrance, Robert M. (1978). The comic hero. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press.Saks, Sol. (1991). Funny business : the craft of comedy writing. Los Angeles CA : Lone Eagle Pub. Co.CTV 7140 Postgraduate Documentary SeminarNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesThis seminar series explores the development of all forms of documentary, and contemporary issues and problems surrounding theform, which are placed within the context of different genres, modes of production, and the work of particular directors andproducers. The subject is also required to incorporate a flexible, alert and adventurous approach to documentary across a range ofgenres, and to consider the philosophical and practical issues which inform historical and current practice.Learning OutcomesEach student will finish two research papers in midterm and final stage (maximum 3500 words). Through the study and research ondocumentary history and theory combining their own understanding and experience, students need to address and develop theirown aesthetic and theocratic ideas and perspectives on documentary study.Contents1. Definition and current status of Film/Video/TV documentary2. Non-fictional film and its relation to society and culture3. Documentary Theory3.1 Issue of Representation3.2 Elements of the Documentary3.3 Form, Control, and Identity4. Historical Impact of the Documentary4.1 The Propagandist tradition4.2 The Realist tradition4.3 Realism, Imperialism and Post-coloniality5. Documentary Genres and Styles5.1 Impressionistic5.2 The Hollywood Model5.3 The documentarist as essayist
  25. 25. 6. Philosophy of Documentary approach6.1 Direct cinema: a documentary French New Wave6.2 Cinema-verite6.3 Frederick Wisemans reality fictions6.4 Post-modern marker7. Laws and Ethics in Making a Documentary7.1 The Need for a Documentary Ethic7.2 Responsibility to subjects7.3 Informed Consent7.4 Ethical Judgments8. The Reality Problem8.1 Dilemmas of enunciation in contemporary documentary8.2 Documentary and the audience8.3 Reality-based Television9. Contemporary Issues in Documentary9.1 A Comparative Study of Eastern and Western Documentaries9.2 The changing technology of documentary production9.3 Ethnographic documentary10. Re-enactment, Reconstruction, and Docudrama11. Aesthetics, Authorship and Documentary MissionMode of TuitionLectures, discussions, screenings, and projectsAssessmentMidterm Paper 40%Final Research Paper 60%ReferencesAitken, I. (1998). The Documentary Film Movement. Edinburgh University Press.Barnouw, E. (1993). Documentary: A History of the Non-Fiction Film. Oxford University Press.Bruzzi, S. (2000). New Documentary: A Critical Introduction. New York: Routledge Press.Dlantinga, C.R. (1997). Rhetoric and representation on nonfiction film. Cambridge University Press.Ellis, J. (1988). Documentary Idea, The: A Critical History of English- Language Documentary Film and Video. Allyn & BaconPublishing. Grant, B.K. & Sloniowski, J. (1988).Documentary the Documentary: Close Readings of Documentary Film and Video.Michigan: Wayne State University Press.Landy, M. (1996). Cinematic Uses of the Past. University of Minnesota Press.MacDougall, D. & Taylor, L. (1988). Transcultural Cinema. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.Nichols, B (1981). Ideology and Image. Bloomington, Indiana: University of Indiana Press.Nichols, B. (2001). Introduction to Documentary. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.OConnell, P.J. (1992). Robert Drew and the Development of Cinema Verite in America. Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press.Ohrn, K. B. (1980). Dorothea Lange and the documentary tradition. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.
  26. 26. Petric, V. (1993). Constructivism in film: The man with the movie camera. Cambridge University Press.Renov, M. (1993). Theorizing Documentary. New York: Routledge Press.Rosenthal, A. (1978). The documentary conscience. Berkely, California: University of California Press.Rothman, W. (1997). Documentary Film Classics. Cambridge University Press.Vaughan, D. (1999). For Documentary: Twelve Essays. California: University of California Press.Waldman, D. and J. Walker, ed. (1999). Feminism and Documentary. University of Minnesota Press.Winston, B. (2000). Liew, Damn Liew and Documentaries. London: British Film Institute.CTV 7150 Postgraduate Dramatic Film/TV ProductionNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesThe class examines the directors responsibilities in preparing pre-shooting script breakdowns and working on the set. Students gainhands-on experience in advanced production techniques, with the emphasis on pre-production planning, scripting, cameraoperations, lighting, audio, and post-production. Students develop and produce original short-subject film/TV that applies theprinciples learned through lectures, film screenings, and from guest speakers.Learning OutcomesGroup film project: a group (minimum of four) of students will complete one short 16mm film project with the maximum length of 8minutes (350 feet).Group TV project: a group (minimum of four) of students will complete one TV project with the maximum length of 10 minutes.Contents1. The Dramatic Script1.1 Research and script development1.2 Telling the story1.3 Script analysis2. The Visualization Process2.1 Idea generation2.2 Storyboards drafting2.3 Production design3. The Directors Role3.1 Pre-production3.2 Production3.3 Post-production4. Staging the Scene4.1 Camera angles and positions
  27. 27. 4.2 Depth of the frame4.3 Point of view4.4 Mobile staging4.5 Camera and lens movement5. Directing Methods5.1 Casting and rehearsal5.2 Rehearsal plan and guidelines5.3 Rehearsal for technical stall5.4 Camera rehearsal6. Film and Video Cameras6.1 Formats, speed and exposure6.2 Operations and mechanics6.3 Compositions6.4 Single-camera techniques7. Lighting for Film and Video7.1 Defining three-dimensionality7.2 Defining space7.3 Color and filters7.4 Light meters8. On-location Sound8.1 Audio recording setup8.2 Advanced recording techniques8.3 Audio equipment9. Sync Sound Workshops9.1 Shooting sync sound as a director9.2 Synchronization of rushes9.3 Sync sound procedures10. Principles in Editing10.1 Shot, sequence, scene10.2 Cut, fade, and dissolve10.3 Continuity cutting11. Devices of Editing11.1 Montage and mise-en-scene11.2 Manipulation of space and time11.3 Time expansion and compression11.4 Cross out12. Editing Analysis12.1 Action12.2 Sound12.3 Light and color13. AVID Non-linear Editing System13.1 Non-linear editing defined
  28. 28. 13.2 Linear versus non-linear13.3 AVID workshops14. Audio-postproduction process14.1 Recording, editing, and mixing using Protools14.2 Using sound as a storytelling device15. Project Screenings and critiquesMode of TuitionWorkshops, demonstration, projects and critiquesAssessmentPresentation 20%Individual film production I (8 minutes) 40%Individual film production II (10 minutes) 40%ReferencesBegleiter, M. (2001). From Word to Image: Storyboarding and the Filmmaking Process. Studio City, California: Michael WieseProductions.Billups, S. (2001). Digital Moviemaking. Studio City, California: Michael Wiese Productions.Browne, S.E. (1996). Video Editing: A Postproduction Primer. London: Focal Press.Burder, J. (1988). The technique of editing 16mm Films (5th ed.). London: Focal Press.Hart, J. (1999). The Art of the Storyboard: Storyboarding for Film, TV, and Animation. London: Focal Press.Proferes, N.T. (2001). Film Directing Fundamentals: From Script to Screen. London: Focal Press.Rabiger, M.P. (1996). Directing: Film Techniques and Aesthetics. London: Focal Press.Reisz, K. 91995). Technique of Film Editing. London: Focal Press.Rose, J. (2000). Producing Great Sound For Digital Video. California: CMP Books.Simon, M. (2000). Storyboards: Motion in Art. London: Focal Press.Watkinson, J. (2000). The Art of Digital Video. London: Focal Press. 3rd edition (July 2000)Zettl, H. (1998). Sight, Sound, Motion: Applied Media Aesthetics (3rd edition). Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing.CTV 7160 Advanced Documentary Production WorkshopNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesDefining the central role of the director in the realization of a documentary, this subject seeks to give students a firm theoretical graspof the principles and practices of shooting and editing film/video documentaries. Students conceptualize, research, write, shoot, andedit their own productions. A series of lectures and discussions explore various visual elements of documentary. Analytical sessions
  29. 29. exploring documentary films are combined with workshops for the presentation and discussion of student work in progress at specificstages.Learning OutcomesEach student will finish two individual documentary projects in midterm and final stage.1st project: each student will complete one short documentary project with the maximum length of 8 minutes. The documentary willbe shot and finished on DV format.2nd project: each student will complete one short documentary project with the maximum length of 15 minutes. The documentary willbe shot and finished on DV format.Contents1. Major Approaches to Documentary2. Selecting a Subject2.1 topic2.2 Location2.3 People3. Script for a documentary project4. Developing an idea through research5. Adapting a true story into a documentary6. Proposal writing and treatment7. The Documentary Interview7.1 Preparations for questions7.2 On location7.3 Shooting Option8. Pre-production8.1 Developing a documentary crew8.2 Equipment Selection9. Production9.1 Camera Work9.2 Lighting for documentary9.3 Documentary Sound10. Postproduction10.1 Shaping the film10.2 Designing a structure10.3 Principles of Visual and sound editing10.4 Narration and music11. Role of director in documentary11.1 Directing the crew11.2 Directing participants11.3 Planning for Spontaneity12. Role of cameraman in documentary13. Role of editor in documentary
  30. 30. 14. Marketing and distributionMode of TuitionLectures, screenings, workshops, projects and critiquesAssessmentIndividual documentary video production (8 minutes) 40%Individual documentary film/video production (15 minutes) 60%ReferencesBaddeley, W.H. (1975). The technique of documentary film production. London: Focal Press.Barbash, I. & Taylor, L. (1997). Cross-Cultural Filmmaking: A Handbook for Making Documentary and Ethnographic Films andVideos. California: University of California Press.Hampe, B. (1997). Making Documentary Films and Reality Videos: A Practical Guide to Planning, Filming, and EditingDocumentaries of Real Events. Owlet Press.Kriwaczek, P. (1997). Documentary for the Small Screen. London: Focal Press.Nichols, B. (1992). Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary. Indiana University Press.Rabigher, M.(1997). Directing the Documentary (3rd edition). London: Focal Press.Rosenthal, A. (1996). Writing, Directing, and Producing Documentary Films and Videos. Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press.Silverstone, R. (1985). Framing Science: The making of a BBC documentary. London: British Film Institute.Tobias, M. (1998). The Search for Reality: The Art of Documentary Filmmaking. Studio City, California: Michael Wiese Productions.CTV 7170 Advanced Dramatic Film/TV Production WorkshopNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7150 Postgraduate Dramatic Film/TV ProductionLevel : Year 2, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Ms. ZHANG WeiminObjectivesAn advanced workshop giving special attention to directing. This workshop provides guidance and study through all the steps adirector follows. Students will utilize skills and concepts developed in Postgraduate Dramatic Film/TV Production. Coursework isdesigned to provide students with a workshop opportunity to refine their skills through the production of a series of individual/groupnarrative film projects, in which each student has an opportunity to direct, shoot, record, and edit. Advanced aesthetic principles ofediting are examined through all forms of classic and current film and TV media. Lectures are supplemented by film screenings andstimulated shooting situations.Learning OutcomesIndividual film project: each student will complete one short 16mm film project with the max. length of 8 min (350feet).Individual TV project: each student will complete one TV project with the max. length of 15 min
  31. 31. Contents1. Elements of Narrative1.1 Story and plot1.2 Character focalization1.3 Rhythm and continuity2. Advanced Narrative Structure2.1 Analyze techniques in cinematography2.2 Analyze techniques in production design2.3 Analyze techniques in visual and sound editing3. Advanced Image Control in Cinematography3.1 Advanced Film camera technique3.2 Advanced Video camera technique4. Creative Lighting Technique4.1 Lighting ratio and Image qualities4.2 Advanced Lighting setup4.3 Creating mood and atmosphere5. Production Design5.1 Make-up5.2 Costumes5.3 Set design5.4 Project Screenings and critiques6. Directing the Actor6.1 General acting6.2 Realistic acting6.3 Method acting6.4 Improvisation7. Dramatic Point7.1 Size of shot7.2 Length of shot7.3 Rhythm in acceleration7.4 Pace, tone and climax8. Editing Aesthetics8.1 Functionalism8.2 Realism8.3 Formativism9. Editing and Narrative Structure9.1 Beginning and End9.2 Editing for Subjects9.3 Editing for Spectators9.4 Timing of cuts10. Extradiegetic Editing10.1 Contrast
  32. 32. 10.2 Parallelism10.3 Symbolism10.4 Leitmotif11. Advanced Issues in Editing11.1 Editing for narrative effect11.2 Effective narrative transitions11.3 Decisions of emphasis12. Advanced Digital Audio Post-production for Film and Video12.1 Creative sound design for film and video12.2 Art of mixing13. Project Screenings and CritiquesMode of TuitionWorkshops, demonstration, projects and critiquesAssessmentIndividual film Production (8 minutes) 40%Individual TV production (15 minutes) 60%ReferencesAlton, J. (1995). Painting With Light. California: University of California Press.Aumont, J. (1986). Montage Eisenstein. Translated by Hildreth, l. and Ross, A. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Carlson, V. (1994). The Professional Cameramans Handbook. London: Focal Press.Case, D. (2001). Film Technology in Post Production. London: Focal Press.Douglass, J.S. & Harnden, G. P. (1995). Art of Technique, The: An Aesthetic Approach to Film and Video Production. Allyn & BaconPublishing.Heisner, B. (1997). Production Design in the Contemporary American Film: A Critical Study of 23 movies and Their Designers.McFarland & Company.Katz, S. D. (1991). Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen. London: Focal Press.Katz, S. D. (1998). Film Directing, Cinematic Motion: A Workshop for Staging Scenes. Studio City, California: Michael WieseProductions.Mamer, B. (1999). Film Production Technique: Creating the Accomplished Imaged (2nd edition). Belmont, California: WadsworthPublishing.Miller, P. (1999). Script Supervising and film continuity. London: Focal Press.Oldhan, G. (1995). First Cut: Conversations With Film Editors. California: University of California Press.Rowlands, A. (1989). Continuity in film and video. London: Focal Press.Sherman, E. (1988). Directing the Film: Film Directors on Their Art. Acrobat Books.Wheeler, P. (2001). Digital Cinematography. London: Focal PressCTV 7180 Postgraduate 3-D Animation WorkshopNumber of units : 3 units (3,3,0)
  33. 33. Prerequisite : CTV 7060 3-D Modeling & Rendering WorkshopLevel : Year 2, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. MAN Chi WahObjectivesThis graduate level course presents the concepts, issues and techniques of the subject, using the software package Alias|WavefrontMaya as an example.There are many types of animation ranging from experimental / abstract to realistic. Students are required to not only be able tonavigate a software interface, but also to create expressive motion. In the course, students will observe and analyze motion andexplore different animation techniques in order to create believable, expressive motion. Animation, because of its time consumingnature, requires planning and organization. In this class, we will work accordingly so that students may consider the work producedin this class a significant and vital part of their developing portfolios.Aesthetic issues dealt with will include observation, story development, staging, timing, camera movement and framing. Successfulanimations, both computer-generated and traditionally generated, will be studied and discussed. There will also be an emphasisplaced on storyboarding as a technique for the development and refinement of the students own animation ideas.Technical issues dealt with will include keyframing, dope sheet and parameter graph editing, hierarchical animation, inversekinematics, deformable surface, motion paths, camera animation, light animation, and output to video. Techniques will be presentedthrough a combination of lecture, demonstration and in-class exercise.The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include in-class exercise. Because of the way the classes arerun, attendance at and active participation in the weekly classes are considered very important and are considered in gradecalculations.There will be one short written exam on the technical principles of 3-D computer animation towards the end of the semester.Learning OutcomesSuccessful students will typically be able to:1. Have a knowledge and understanding of leading-edge computer graphics as applied to the computer animation medium.2. Have a knowledge and understanding of the technology behind the latest generation of computer animation.3. Use the persistence of vision concept.4. Implement standard computer animation programming techniques.5. Think creatively, make decisions and apply problem solving skills.6. Communicate their ideas and understand the concept of order by sequencing events.7. Use their imagination and translate ideas into action.8. Gain an understanding of the principle of animation.9. Participate in and productively respond to critique of work.10. Demonstrate a strong and consistent work ethic.11. Identify the available career opportunities, and describe the roles of people employed in environments that use or createanimation.Contents1. General Perspectives1.1 Basic Concepts of animation
  34. 34. 1.2 History and background of 3-D computer animation1.3 General workflow1.4 The illusion of motion1.5 Anatomy of an Animation Program1.6 Character development2. Storyboarding2.1 Screenplay: subject, defined treatment and structure2.2 Sequence of images and verbal description2.3 Preliminary, presentation, and production storyboard2.4 Visual style and look2.5 Verbal description of the action2.6 Sound and timing indication3. Animation3.1 Principles and structures: keyframes and inbetweening3.1.1 Linear interpolation3.1.2 Interpolation of position and orientation3.1.3 Interpolation of shape and attributes3.2 Expressive motion3.2.1 Primary and secondary motion3.2.2 Anticipation and follow-through3.2.3 Overlapping action3.2.4 Ease in and ease out3.2.5 Time relations within actions for the illusion of life3.2.6 Mass and weight, and preserve volume3.2.7 Staging: the camera viewpoint to best show the action3.3 Hierarchical animation3.4 Model animation3.4.1 Forward and Inverse Kinematics3.4.2 Constraints and limits3.4.3 Motion paths3.4.4 Freeform shape changes3.4.5 Rigging rigid surfaces on IK skeletons3.4.6 Rigging flexible surfaces on IK skeletons3.5 Deformer animation3.6 Camera animation3.7 Light, shader and texture animation3.8 Introduction to motion dynamics3.9 Rendering of frames and correct frame rate3.10 OutputMode of TuitionLectures, demonstrations, critical appreciations, and workshop
  35. 35. AssessmentParticipation: 20%(The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include numerous in-class exercises. Because of this,attendance at and participation in the weekly classes is considered extremely important and is considered in grading calculations)Assignments x 3 60%(Bouncing ball, flower sack, and morphing exercises)Exam 20%(Text book: ORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & Company- only chapters on animation)ReferencesORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & CompanyKerlow, I. (3rd ed) (2003). The Art of 3-D Computer Animation and Effects. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.Kerlow, I. (2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics for Designers and artists. New York: Van Nostrand ReinholdFoley, J. Dam, A. Feiner, S. and Hughes, J. (ED 2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics, Principles and Practice. California: AddisonWesleyCulhane, S. (1988). Animation From Script to Screen. New York: St. Martins PressMuybridge, E. (1955) The Human Figure in Motion. New York: DoverMuybridge, E. (1957) Animals in Motion. New York: DoverLaybourne, K. (1979). The Animation Book: a Complete Guide to Animated Filmmaking from flip-books to sound cartoonhttp://www.alias.com/eng/index.shtmlhttp://www.highend3d.com/maya/tutorialshttp://www.3dcafe.comhttp://www.3dlinks.comCTV 7190 Advanced 3-D Animation Production WorkshopNumber of units : 3 units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7180 Postgraduate 3-D Animation WorkshopLevel : Year 2, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. MAN Chi WahObjectivesThis graduate level course deals with advanced issues of 3-D computer animation. The course will stress professional techniquesand workflow methodology to maximize students realization of their ideas and concepts. Students will develop highly accuratetiming, to achieve their individual style of animation. The course should improve students insight into what makes an animationsucceed, whether it is computer generated or not. It should also improve students abilities to themselves produce successful 3-Dcomputer animation. The Alias|wavefront Maya and Adobe Premiere software packages will be used as an example and to producethe project.Each student will work on a single animation project throughout the entire semester. Maximum running time of the storyboard is two
  36. 36. minutes. A preliminary storyboard will be developed for the entire animation. In consultation with the instructor, the student will thenselect a 15-20 second segment to be produced. A presentation storyboard and production plan will be developed for this chosensegment. The student will then work on the production of this segment during the remainder of the semester.By developing a detailed production plan for a single animation, each student will begin to develop an in-depth understanding of whatmakes 3-D computer animation work - equally from the conceptual, aesthetic, technical, and production point of view. By limiting theactual production to only portions of the animation, you will have the experience of trying to bring an animation segment up toprofessional standards, and a realistic chance of doing so.In the workshop, students are expected to conduct themselves as professionals, Moreover, they are expected to be considerate andhelpful peers to their classmates, to share knowledge, to be attentive and to provide thoughtful commentary during critiques, toparticipate heart and soul, to be on time, to present work in progress professionally, and to turn in the project on time and in aprofessional manner.There will be one written exam on the technical principles of 3-D computer animation towards the end of the semester.Learning OutcomesSuccessful students will typically be able to:1. Improve the insight into what makes an animation succeed.2. Improve their abilities to produce successful three-dimensional computer animation.3. Have a knowledge and understanding of the technology behind the latest generation of computer animation and special effects.4. Explain how historical and traditional types of animation are the cornerstones for todays high tech animation industry.5. Appreciate the historical development of animation and special effects.6. Demonstrate an understanding of project management and effective teamwork.7. Participate in and productively respond to critique of animation works.8. Gain an in-depth understanding of the principles of animation and apply them to the work.9. Demonstrate a strong and consistent work ethic.10. Explain why knowledge of early technologies and methods of animation are useful and relevant to a contemporary career inanimation.11. Identify the available career opportunities, and describe the roles of people employed in environments that use or createanimation.Contents1. Pre-production1.1 Production planning1.2 Character and model sketches1.3 Preliminary storyboards1.4 Final, presentation storyboard1.5 Schedule for the completion of the animation1.6 Organize by scene Vs by specification jobs1.7 Technical tests and notes2. Production2.1 Models building2.2 Model character, low / high details2.3 Shaders / materials tests and preparations
  37. 37. 2.4 Lighting effects in the scenes2.5 Motion tests2.5.1 Observation2.5.2 Block timing tests2.5.3 Live video recording2.5.4 Primary and secondary motion2.6 Clean up hidden surface2.7 Camera setup2.8 Rendering is related to modeling and animation2.9 Soundtrack: collecting existing music or creating your own effects3. Technical topics3.1 Advanced modeling utilities3.2 Motion dynamics and particle systems3.3 Shape deformations3.4 Expressions and scripting languages3.5 Non-linear-animation, trax editor3.6 Procedural animation3.7 Skeleton, binding, and skinning3.8 Super-sampling and hi-res textures3.9 Rendering methods and strategies4. Postproduction4.1 Editing digitally, using Adobe Premiere / in video4.2 Sense of timing4.3 Flow of the images and sound4.4 Alpha masking in Adobe Premiere4.5 Import and export4.6 Algorithmic touch and transitions4.7 Typography and design, titles and credits4.8 RecordingMode of TuitionLectures, demonstrations, critical appreciations, and workshopAssessmentParticipation: 10%Pre-production assignments 30%(including storyboard, production plan, production schedule and timing tests)Project 50%(A completed twenty second project)Exam 10%(Text book: ORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & Company)
  38. 38. ReferencesORourke, M. (3rd ed) (2002). Principles of three-dimensional Computer Animation. New York: W.W. Norton & CompanyKerlow, I. (3rd ed) (2003). The Art of 3-D Computer Animation and Effects. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.Kewlow, I. (2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics for Designers and artists. New York: Van Nostrand ReinholdFoley, J. Dam, A. Feiner, S. and Hughes, J. (ED 2nd ed) (1996). Computer Graphics, Principles and Practice. California: AddisonWesleyCulhane, S. (1988). Animation From Script to Screen. New York: St. Martins PressMuybridge, E. (1955) The Human Figure in Motion. New York: DoverMuybridge, E. (1957) Animals in Motion. New York: DoverLaybourne, K. (1979). The Animation Book: a Complete Guide to Animated Filmmaking from flip-books to sound cartoonhttp://www.alias.com/eng/index.shtmlhttp://www.highend3d.com/maya/tutorialshttp://www.3dcafe.comhttp://www.3dlinks.comCTV 7200 Interactive Multimedia DesignNumber of Units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. David AUObjectivesThe course focuses on the investigation and exploration of creative aspects of various interactive media for new forms of personaland collective expression. Aesthetic and technical issues in designing and developing interactive multimedia will be examined.These include the nature and application of interactivity, the potential and limitations of existing software and hardware tools, and thepromise of future technologies. These new media are attracting media industrys attention both as extensions of existing mediaproperties and as original works that can stand on their own. Through lectures, demonstrations, multimedia projects, students will beguided through the multimedia production process and application together with the examination of possibilities in its integration withdifferent genres of new media.Learning OutcomesSuccessful students will typically be able to:1. Identify roles that media arts have in reflecting, sustaining, and challenging beliefs and traditions.2. Demonstrate an understanding of the evolution of media arts technology to make images.3. Identify a variety of tools and resources for creating and manipulating multimedia documents.4. Demonstrate an understanding of multimedia terminology.5. Use Advanced Editing and Multimedia Authoring Tools6. Use text, and manipulate its behavior and appearance.7. Design Multimedia and Interactive Interfaces and Create Images and video for multimedia.8. Analyse the effectiveness of media elements used.
  39. 39. 9. Design a multimedia solution to a problem.10. Create a multimedia presentation to display the skills learned.11. Think creatively, make decisions and apply problem solving skills.12. Analyse the effectiveness of a multimedia project for its impact on the intended audience in terms of productivity, utility, andsocial consequences.13. Participate in and productively respond to critique of work.14. Identify the career opportunities for and roles of persons employed in environments that use interactive multimedia.Contents1. Interactive Media Form1.1 Interactive Movies1.2 Interactive Television1.3 Interactive Entertainment1.4 Interactive Educational Tools1.5 Interactive Advertising2. Design and Production2.1 Linear Presentation and Building Blocks2.2 Content analysis2.3 Organizing multimedia storyboard2.4 Production Methodologies3. Multimedia Platforms and Tools3.1 CD-ROM3.2 Photo CD3.3 DVD3.4 WWW3.5 Director and Flash4. Construction of Interactive Visual Elements4.1 Text and Graphics4.2 Digital video4.3 3-D Animation4.4 Morphing4.5 Special effects5. Construction of Interactive Audio Elements5.1 Audio design and processing5.2 Voice, sound effects and music5.3 Musical Instrument Digital Interface6. Interactive Multimedia Components6.1 Computer-human Interface6.2 Optical Storage6.3 Bandwidth and bit-depth6.4 File Compression7. Interactivity Programming
  40. 40. 7.1 Levels of Interactivity7.2 Creating Interactive Links7.3 Use of Javascript and DHTML7.4 Creativity in Multimedia Authoring8. Audio and Video Streaming Technology8.1 Streaming audio8.2 Streaming Video8.3 Hardware and software concerns9. Principles of Web Design9.1 Website design9.2 Website maintenance9.3 Website development10. Postproduction process for Multimedia10.1 Production testing and debugging10.2 Packaging and Distribution11. Multi-media and its Integration with Electronic Imaging Technologies11.1 Digital TV11.2 High Definition TV11.3 Virtual Reality12. Issues in Designing and Developing Interactive Media Form12.1 Business and legal issues12.2 Multimedia database management12.3 Audience and environmentMode of TuitionLectures, tutorials, workshops, projects and presentationsAssessmentAssignment 20%(The course is organized to maximize hands-on experience and will include numerous in-class exercises. Because of this,attendance at and participation in the weekly classes is considered extremely important and is considered in grading calculations)Presentation 30%Final Individual Project 50%ReferencesAnderson, C.J. & Veljkov, M.D. (1990). Creating Interactive Multimedia: A Practical Guide. Illinois: Scott, Foresman.Bunzel, M.J. & Morris, S.K. (1992). Multimedia Applications Development. New York: McGraw-Hill.Burger, J. (1993). The Desktop Multimedia Bible. New York: Addision-Wesley.Faulkner, C. (1998). The Essence of Human-Computer Interaction. Prentice Hall.Lipton, R. (1992). Multimedia Toolkit. New York: Random House.Mohler, J.L. (2001). Flash 5 Graphics, Animation and Interactivity. Onword Press.Murie, M.D. (1993). Macintosh Multimedia Workshop. Indiana: Hayden.
  41. 41. Oppenheim, C. (1998). CD-ROM Fundamentals to Applications. London: Butterworths.CTV 7210 Sound Design for MediaNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Mr. David AUObjectivesThis course aims to achieve a deeper understanding of the creative potential of sound in media. Based on practical exercises, thesubject offers a structured practical introduction to the skills and disciplines of film sound recording and post-production, and in-depthfamiliarization with the recording and editing of digital audio. Students will master the skills of recording, editing and mixing for film,television and internet by working on assigned projects, combining all ADR, Foley, Dialog, and Effects elements to the compositesoundtrack.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Be able to interpret the in-depth meaning and motivation of the sound and music used in various forms of media.2. Develop a strong sense for creativity and experimentation with sound design in all media.3. Develop a critical aural sense for audio fidelity at the advanced level.4. Be able to acquire the technical skills as required in on-location shooting and audio post-production process.Contents1. Sound for media1.1 Television sound1.2 Film sound1.3 Animation sound1.4 Radio sound1.5 Internet sound2. Roles of sound2.1 Information2.2 Inner versus outer orientation2.3 Energy and structure3. Audio-visual combination3.1 Picture-sound matching criteria3.2 Homophonic versus Polyphonic structure3.3 Audio-visual parallelism and counterpoint3.4 Sound and music montage4. The sound crew4.1 Dialogue editor
  42. 42. 4.2 Music editor4.3 Sound effects editor4.4 Sound designer5. Production Sound5.1 On-location recording setup5.2 Multi-miking and multi-tracking5.3 Advanced recording skills6. Postproduction Procedures6.1 Editing to picture lock6.2 Film versus video formats6.3 Film formats and generations7. Voiceover recording7.1 Diction and clarity7.2 Rhythm and timing7.3 Acting and dramatic interpretation7.4 Vococentrism8. Creative Sound effects8.1 The art of foley8.2 Technique of foley recording8.3 Inventing sound props9. Musical aesthetics for images9.1 Musics relationship to sound9.2 Music as drama9.3 The mechanics of music scoring10. Audio softwares for multimedia10.1 Digidesign Protools10.2 Digidesign Samplecell10.3 Cakewalk Audio11. The future of sound11.1 Audio Installation11.2 Soundscape11.3 Sonic ArtsMode of TuitionWorkshops, demonstrations, analysis and projectsAssessmentIndividual Skill Test 20%Midterm Project 30%Final Project 50%References
  43. 43. Chion, M. & Gorbman, C. (1994). Audio-Vision. New York: Columbia U. Press.Collins, M. E. (2002). Pro Tools for Music Production: Recording, Editing, and Mixing. London: Focal Press.Dan, C. (1991). Music in film and video productions. London: Focal Press.Gibson, D. & Petersen, G. (1997). The Art of Mixing : A Visual Guide to Recording, Engineering, and Production. California: MixBookshelf/ Mix Books.Holman, T. (2001). Sound for Film and Television. London: Focal Press.Kenny, T. (1997). Sound for Picture : The Art of Sound Design in Film and Television. Hal Leonard Publishing Corporation.Lastra, J. (2000). Sound Technology and the American Cinema (Film and Culture Series). New York: Columbia University Press.LoBrutto, Vincent (1994). Sound-on-Film: Interviews with Creators of Film Sound. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers.Morgan, D. (2000). Knowing The Score: Film Composers Talk About the Art, Craft, Blood, Sweat, and Tears of Writing for Cinema.Harper Entertainment.Pendergast. R. M. (1992). Film Music : A Neglected Art : A Critical Study of Music in Films. W.W. Norton & Company.Russell, M. & Young, J. (2000). Film Music : Screencraft. Butterworth-Heinemann.Sonnenschein, D. (2001). Sound Design : The Expressive Power of Music, Voice, and Sound Effects in Cinema. Studio City,California: Michael Wiese Productions.Yewdall, D. (1999). The Practical Art of Motion Picture Sound. London: Focal Press.CTV 7220 World Cinema: History, Aesthetics, and Cultural IssuesNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 1, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner/Instructor : Dr. Ian AITKEN, Dr. YEH Yueh YuObjectivesThis subject serves as an advanced introduction to the discipline of film studies. Emphasis will be placed on learning rudiments offilm art, form, style and history. Highlights include basic film elements, early and modern art cinema, classical Hollywood cinema,national cinemas, counter cinema, non-Western cinema such as Third World filmmaking and non-fiction film practices such asavant-garde and documentary film. By the end of the course, the student is expected to understand the history of cinema as a formal,artistic, industrial, cultural and political entity.Learning Outcomes1. To achieve an understanding of some of the major movements, figures and films in world cinema history.2. To develop a critical attitude towards the understanding of cinema history3. To develop an ability to place films, figures and ideas within a historical context4. To develop skills in dealing with academic lectures, and in note-taking and revision5. To inculcate an appreciation of the quality and importance of the world cinema heritageContents1. Film Form: Fiction1.1 Mise-en-scene, cinematographic properties of the film image, sound, narrative and editing
  44. 44. 1.2 Germen Expressionism1.3 Soviet Montage1.4 French Poetic Realism2. Film Form: Non-fiction2.1 Classical avant-garde2.2 Documentary2.3 Ethnographic film3. Hollywood3.1 Classical Hollywood Film Style3.2 Non-classical Hollywood Cinema3.3 Hollywood as Industry4. Art Cinema4.1 Italian Neo-realism4.2 The French New Wave4.3 German New Cinema4.4 Eastern Europe4.5 Asia5. Modernism and Counter-Cinema5.1 Feminist Film5.2 Black Cinema5.3 European high Modernists5.4 American Independent5.5 Queer5.6 Underground film6. Third World Filmmaking6.1 Africa6.2 Latin America6.3 Asia6.4 ProblematicsMode of TuitionScreening, lectures, class discussionAssessmentFinal exam 50%Class tests 30%Discussion participation 20%Required readings selected from:Armes, Roy. (1987). Third World Filmmaking and the West. Berkeley: University of California Press.Bordwell, David and Kristin Thompson. (1996, 5th edition). Film Art: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill.Cook, David. (1996. 3rd ed.). A History of Narrative Cinema. New York: Oxford University Press.
  45. 45. Kolker, Robert. (1983). The Altering Eye: Contemporary International Cinema. New York: Oxford University Press.Ray, Robert. (1985). A Certain Tendency of the Hollywood Cinema, 1930-1980. Princeton, N. J: Princeton University Press.Thompson, Kristin and David Bordwell. (1994). Film History: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill.Recommended Readings selected from:Bordwell, David. (1997). On the History of Film Style. Cambridge: Harvard University PressJames, David, (1989). The allegories of Cinema. Princeton, N. J: Princeton University PressKolker, Robert, (2001). Film, Form, and Culture [electronic resource]: the Cinema Studies CD-RO. Boston: McGraw-Hill Companies.Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey. (Ed)(1996). The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Nelmes, Jill. (Ed)(1999, 2nd ed). An Introduction to Film Studies. New York: Rouledge.CTV 7230 Graduate Seminar on Chinese New Waves CinemaNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 2, semester 1Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Dr. YEH Yueh YuObjectivesThis course analyses textual and institutional features of various Chinese New Waves, including those from Hong Kong, Taiwan andthe PRCs Fifth Generation. Close analysis of films, historical background and exploration of critical controversies will be taken.Comparative perspectives are also incorporated to tease out differences and similarities of industry, audiences, auteurism andcultural politics. Experts of each individual New Wave movement will be invited to participate on the seminar.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Understand the origin and rise of the Fifth Generation; Mainland and Taiwan New Cinema and the Hong Kong New Wave cinema.2. Familiarize with the aesthetics and implication of films by leading figures of the New Wave Cinema: Tsui Hark, Ann Hui, PatrickTam, Allen Fong, etc.Contents1. Introduction:1.1 Hong Kong New Wave1.2 Taiwan New Cinema1.3 The Fifth Generation2. Hong Kong New Wave2.1 Industry2.2 Auteurs2.3 Critical Reception2.4 Audience
  46. 46. 3. Taiwan New Cinema3.1 Industry3.2 Auteurs3.3 Critical Reception3.4 Audience4. The Fifth Generation4.1 Industry4.2 Auteurs4.3 Critical Reception4.4 Audience5. Historical Overview: Compare and Contrast5.1 Decline and Disappearance5.2 Co-option5.3 Post New WavesMode of TuitionLecture, seminar and class discussion.AssessmentSeminar paper 70%Presentation 20%Participation 10%ReadingsNi, Zhen. Stories of the Beijing Film Academy. Trans. Chris Berry. Duke University Press, 2003.Yau, Esther, ed. At Full Speed: Hong Kong Cinema in a Borderless World. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001.Chiao, Hsiung-ping, ed. Hong Kong New Wave. Taipei: China Times, 1987.---, ed. Taiwan New Cinema. Taipei: China Times, 1988.Cheuk Pak Tong. Hong Kong New Wave Cinema. Hong Kong: Center for Hong Kong and Cultural studies, Chinese University ofHong Kong, 2003.Cornelius, Sheila. New Chinese Cinema: Challenging Representations. New York: Wallflower, 2002.Berry, Chris, ed. Perspectives on Chinese Cinema. London: BFI, 1991CTV 7240 Critical Issues of Film Theory and CriticismNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : CTV 7220 World Cinema: History, Aesthetics and CulturalIssuesLevel : Year 3Duration : 45 hoursPlanner/Instructor : Dr. YEH Yueh Yu
  47. 47. ObjectivesThis course is designed to acquaint students with contemporary film theory and criticism. It has two focuses. The first is to survey filmtheory and criticism chronologically, from the post-war period to the full-fledged development of film studies in the late 1970s. Thesecond focus is to guide students through the application of key theories and critical tools in film studies. Various methods of filmanalysis and criticism will be discussed in detail, including realism, auteur criticism, ideology, cine-modernism, third world cinemaand third cinema, psychoanalysis, feminist film criticism, postmodernism and Orientalism.Learning OutcomesAt the end of the course, students are expected1. to be familiar with the disciplinary protocols of film studies and capable of analyzing a film critically,2. to understand film as a formal construct,3. to place films within a broader theoretical, generic, political, gendered, national and cross-cultural context.Contents1. Canon Formation1.1 Cine-realism1.2 Formalism and poetics1.3 Film authorship2. Structuralism2.1 Semiotics2.2 Film as language3. Radical Theory after May 19683.1 Ideology and politics3.2 Cine-modernism and counter cinema3.3 Third World Cinema and Third Cinema4. Post-structuralism4.1 Psychoanalysis4.2 Feminist Film Criticism4.3 Critique of post-structuralist theory5. Postmodernism5.1 Pastiche and nostalgia5.2 Simulacra5.3 Meta-narrative6. Postcolonial Theory6.1 Theory of hybridity6.2 Orientalism6.3 Subaltern study6.4 Critique of postcolonial theoryMode of TuitionScreening, lectures, class discussion and presentation
  48. 48. AssessmentResearch paper 50%Mid-term paper 30%Discussion participation and presentation 20%Required Readings selected fromAdorno, T. and Horeheimer, M.. (1991). Dialectic of Enlightenment. New York: Continuum.Andrew, D. (1976). The Major Film Theories. New York.: Oxford University PressAshcroft, B., Griffiths, G. , and Tiffin, H.. (Ed) (1995). The Post-colonial Studies Reader. New York: Routledge.Barthes, R. (1974). S/Z. New York: Noonday.Baudrillard, J. (2001). Selected Writings. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.Basin, A. (1967). What is Cinema? Vol. I. Berkeley: University of California PressBordwell, D. (1988). Ozu and Poetics of Cinema. Princeton: Princeton University PressBordwell, D. (1989). Making Meaning. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Bordwell, D. and Staiger, J. and Thompson, K. (1985). The Classical Hollywood Cinema: Film Style & mode of Production to 1960.New York: Columbia University Press.Eisenstein, S. (1957). Film Form. New York: Meridian Books.Hoesterey, I. (2001). Pastiche: Cultural Memory in Art, Film, Literature. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Lunn. E. (1982). Marxism and Modernism. Berkeley: University of California Press.Metz, C. (1982). The Imaginary Signifier. Indiana University Press.Nicholas, B. (Ed)(1976). Movies and Methods. Vol. I and II. Berkeley: U of California Press.Pines, J. and Willemen, P. (Ed)(1989). Questions of Third Cinema. BFI.Said, E. (1979). Orientalism. Vintage.Stam, R. and Miller, T. (Ed)(2000). Film and Theory: An Anthology. Malden Mass.: Blackwell Publishers.Stam, R. (2000). Film Theory: An Introduction. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers.Young, R. J.C. (1999). Introducing Postcolonial Theory.Blackwell Publishers.Recommend Readings selected fromAshcroft, B. (1998). Key Concepts in Post-colonial Studies. New York: Routledge.Kaplan, E. A. (Ed) (2000). Feminism and Film. New York: Oxford University Press.Lapsley, R. and Westlake, M. (1998). Film Theory: An Introduction. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press.Mast, G. , Cohen, M. and Braudy, L. (Ed, 4th ed.) (1992). Film Theory and Criticism. Oxford University Press.Schatz, T. (1981). Hollywood Genres. UT Austin UP.Silverman, K. (1983). The Subject of Semiotics. Oxford University press.Stam, R., Burgoyne, R. and Flitterman-Lewis, S. (1992). New Vocabularies in Film Semiotics: Structuralism, Post- structuralism, andBeyond. New York: Rouledge.Thornham, S. (Ed) (1999). Feminist Film Theory: A Reader. New York: New York University Press.CTV 7250 Graduate Seminar on Hong Kong TelevisionNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : Nil
  49. 49. Level : Year 2, semester 2Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. CHEUK Pak Tong, Dr. NG Chun BongObjectivesThis seminar series explore the expertise and professionalism of Hong Kong Television industry. It is designed to allow the studentsto share their opinions, experiences and reflections on local television with the major TV professionals invited. Controversial issuesof Hong Kong TV culture, programming battle, market competition, audience reception, new technology andtransnational-co-production are discussed.Learning OutcomesStudent should:1. Understand the development of the Hong Kong Television industry.2. Understand the influence of the Hong Kong Television industry on mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia and Malaysia,etc.3. Be able to help other countries to develop their TV industry.Contents1. Industry and Organization1.1 The rise and fall of network system1.2 Broadcasting and narrow-broadcasting1.3 The concept of alternative TV1.4 Advertisement and consumersion2. Programming Battle and Market Competition2.1 Audience rating and viewing habits2.2 Case studies on Hong Kong TV Battles2.3 TV & other media competition2.4 Population change and TV programming3. Voyeurism and Hong Kong Television3.1 Epistemophilia and Info-tainment Programme3.2 Television as Paparazzi3.3 Tabloid Television in Hong Kong3.4 "Big Brother" show in Hong Kong4. High Anxiety: TV as Crisis Resolution4.1 Social Anxiety and TV News4.2 War and Terrorism in TV4.3 Conflict and Crisis Element in TV Drama4.4 Exile Television5. Creative Challenge in Hong Kong Television5.1 The Rise and Fall of TV Drama5.2 Drama vs Game Show5.3 Sports as Mass Entertainment
  50. 50. 5.4 Producing "True-man" Show6. "My TV Programme"6.1 Case Studies on Hong Kong TV Programme6.2 Produces on His Works6.3 Scriptwriter on His Works6.4 Critics on Producers/Scriptwriters7. Globalization of Hong Kong Television7.1 Global Perspective of Hong Kong TV7.2 Trans-strait/Transnational Co-production7.3 Production Concepts and the Acquisition of Skills Overseas7.4 Hong Kong Professionals in Asian Region and their Contribution7.5 Towards and Television of Greater ChinaMode of TuitionSeminars, Screening, DiscussionAssessmentSeminar participation 35%Discussion participation 15%Thesis 50%Required Readings Selected FromBarker, M. and Petley, J. (ed) (1997). Ill Effect: The Media/Violence Debate. London and New York: Routledge.DAgostino, P. and Tafler, D. (1995). Transmission: Toward Post-Television Cutlure. London: Sage Publication.French, D. and Richards, M. (ed) (1996). Contemporary Television-Eastern Perspective. London: Sage Publication.Gauntlett, D. and Hill, A. (1999). TV Living. London and New York: Routlege.Ma, K.W. (1999). Culture, Politics and Television in Hong Kong. London and New York: Routlege.Selby, K. and Cowdery, R. (1995). How to Study Television. London: MacMillan.Smith, A. (ed) (1995). Television, an International History. New York: Oxford University Press.Whannel, G. (1992). Fields in Vision: Television Sport and Cultural Transformation. London and New York: Routlege.Wilson, T. (1993). Watching Television, Hermeneutics, Reception and Popular Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press.馬傑偉 (1996)。電視與文化認同。香港:次文化堂。洪清田(1999)。從【雍正】【還珠】看中港台社會文化。香港:明報出版社。張振東、李春武(1997)。香港廣播電視發展史。北京:中國廣播電視出版社。蘇鑰機、鋒庭耀(2001)。電視節目欣賞指數:香港經驗。香港:電視節目欣賞指數調查顧問團出版。CTV 7260 Hong Kong Media and GlobalizationNumber of Units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 3, semester 1Duration : 45 hours
  51. 51. Planner : Mr. David AU, Dr. CHEUK Pak TongObjectivesThe subject explores the Hong Kong media, with emphasis on cinema and television, in its social-historical context from 30s to thepresent. Its impact on both Asian and global media and community will be thoroughly examined. Attention will be paid to theprocesses and patterns of the changes in Hong Kong media industries as a major shaping force of globalization.Learning OutcomesStudents should:1. Achieve a deeper understanding of the developmental process of Hong Kong media and its various impact on both Asian andglobal media and community.2. Understand the processes and patterns of the changes in Hong Kong media industries as the primary shaping force ofglobalization.3. Develop a global perspective in terms of future development of both domestic and global media market.Contents1. Defining Globalization1.1 Global Perspective of Hong Kong cinema1.2 Global Perspective of Hong Kong television2. Historical Perspective of Hong Kong Cinema2.1 HK cinema before 2nd World War2.2 HK cinema and Shanghai in 30s-40s2.3 HK cinema after 19493. Growth of Hong Kong movies in overseas market3.1 Hong Kong movies in Southeast Asia3.2 Hong Kong movies in Taiwan3.3 Hong Kong movies in Mainland China4. Shaws Brother and Asia4.1 Collaboration with Korea and Japan4.2 Collaboration with Malaysia, Phillipines and Thailand5. Hong Kong Cinema and Globalization5.1 Recognition in international film festival: Cannes and Milan5.2 Distribution of HK films in foreign mini-theaters and art house5.3 Release of HK films in mainstream commercial circuits in the West6. Hong Kong Television and Globalization6.1 Transnational Co-production and Broadcast6.2 International awards and recognition7. Hong Kong Television in S.E. Asia7.1 Hong Kong TV programme in Malaysia7.2 Hong Kong TV influence on Singapore TV Industry7.3 Hong Kong TV influence on TV station setup in Indonesia
  52. 52. 8. Hong Kong Television and Taiwan8.1 Popularity of TV drama series in 80s8.2 TVBS in Taiwan9. Hong Kong Television and China9.1 Trans-border broadcast9.2 Entry to China Television market10. TVB in North America and Europe10.1 Satellite TV Broadcast to U.S., Canada and Australia10.2 Satellite TV Broadcast to England and France10.3 Co-Shareholding of Fairchild TV in Canada11. Foreign Influence on Domestic Media Market11.1 Korean TV series11.2 Korean Films11.3 Japanese TV series11.4 CCTV, ETTV, CNN, BBC, Discovery, Asia News Channels12. The Current Domestic TV Broadcasting Market12.1 Pay TV12.2 Cable TV12.3 Satellite TV12.4 Web TV13. Contribution of Hong Kong TV and Film Industry professionals13.1 To Hong Kong13.2 To Greater China13.3 To S.E. Asian Region13.4 To Hollywood and the WestMode of TuitionLectures, discussions, projects and presentationsAssessmentMidterm Paper 20%Presentation 30%Final Research Paper 50%References2001 中國電影節目榜組委會,新銳 2000 廣告公司,《新周刊》雜誌社編著(2002):《中國電視紅皮書 2001》。中國:漓江出版社。黃升民,丁俊杰主編(2001):《中國廣電媒介集團化研究》。北京:中國物價出版社。劉現成(2000):《華人傳媒分析》。台北:亞太圖書出版社。鞠侃杉主編(2002):《改革中國電視》。北京:工商出版社。劉幼琍(1997):《多頻道電視與觀眾:90 年代的電視媒體與閱讀人收視行為研究》。台北:時英出版社。呂郁女(1999):《衛星時代:中國大陸電視產業的發展與挑戰》。台北:時英出版社。"Television Broadcast Limited" Hong Kong: TVB. 2002.
  53. 53. Wang, G (co-edited with Servaes, J. & Goonasekera, A.) The New Communication Landscape: Demystifying Media Globalisation.London: Routledge.Waters, M. (1995) Globalisation. London. Routledge.CTV 7270 Current Issues of Asian MediaNumber of units : 3 Units (3,3,0)Prerequisite : NilLevel : Year 3Duration : 45 hoursPlanner : Dr. YEH Yueh YuObjectivesThis subject is designed as an introduction to the latest media development in the East Asian region, with a focus on trades,marketization, branding, distribution and new mode of exhibition. In addition to lectures on the background and history of East Asiancinema, guests from the Asian media industry will be invited to share their work and experiences with advanced students, which willbe followed by relevant discussions on major issues of Asian Media. The relationship between politics, aesthetics, technology, andmedia market will be investigated through various current cases.Learning OutcomesTo have a basic understanding of the institutions and culture history of East Asian cinema as a regional cinemaTo obtain an updated knowledge of East Asian market as an emerging film market in the worldTo acquire a comparative perspective on the difference of and connection among national cinemas in East AsiaTo identity major players and their roles in creating (East) Asia as a brand name in world film tradeContents1. Introduction of Asian Media1.1 Japan1.2 Korea1.3 Hong Kong1.4 Taiwan1.5 China1.6 Singapore1.7 Malaysia2. Financing, Distribution and Marketing2.1 East Asia as a new integrated market2.2 Financing2.3 Distribution2.4 Marketing3. Media Convergence3.1 New technology and media policy and regulations3.2 Exploring the Internet

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