Eating Your Way to a
  Healthier You: From Your
  Kitchen to the Restaurant
         Sabrina Candelaria, MPH, RD, LD/N
Mil...
Health & Eating
Problem Areas


• Preparing foods at home

• Grocery shopping

• Food labels

• Eating out
Preparing Foods at Home


           PROS                     CONS
•   YOU control what is • Involves planning ahead
    i...
Eating Healthy at Home: What
                 Does It Take?

       Healthy Cooking Strategies
• Making your meals more “H...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

()
(1)   Adopt Healthier Cooking Methods
            p               g
•     Roast
•     Bake
• ...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

(2) Fresh fruits and vegetables are ideal but not always
                                    ide...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

(4) Make the most of time spent cooking.
    Prepare more food than you will eat in one sitting...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

(6) Lighten up your recipes by substituting fat &
    cholesterol sources with healthier alterna...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

   Use fat free or 1% milk instead of whole milk or 2% milk
          fat-free
   in your recip...
Tips For Healthy Cooking

(8) For recipes using chocolate:
    add tablespoons of cocoa powder and 1 t bl
     dd 3 t bl...
Grocery Shopping
Grocery Shopping Strategies

(1) Plan meals in advance to save money, energy, and
    time.
    Include foods needed for ...
Grocery Shopping Strategies

()
(4) Use food labels as a guide to healthy choices.
                           g           ...
Grocery Shopping Strategies

()
(6) Start your j
          y    journey on the p
                     y        perimeter o...
Food Label Lingo
US FDA, “How to Use Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label”




                                   ...
Health-related Claims
                      FDA Guidelines
• Low calorie – Less than 40 calories per serving.
• Low choles...
Food Labels: % Daily Value


■ Daily Values are average levels of nutrients for a person
  eating 2,000 calories a day. A ...
Food Label Info



  U.S. Food and Drug Administration
          Nutrition Facts Label
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fdnew...
Dining Out



“Key to dining out healthier is to have a
 Key
  plan of attack before you get there”
Dining Out Healthy

()
(1) Remember that food does not have to lack taste and
    flavor in order to be healthy.
(2) Alway...
Dining Out Healthy

(4) Leave the rules of the past, where they belong…
    …in the past.
    Finishing everything on you...
Dining Out Healthy


(7) Ask for dressings and sauces to be served “on the
                                               ...
Dining Out Healthy

(10) Red flag terms on a menu:
                g
()
• Fried
• Crispy
•CCreamy
• Buttery
• Pan-fried
  ...
Bran Muffin                  Breakfast Sandwich




420 calories, 20 grams of fat   300 calories, 12 grams of fat
Chicken Caesar Salad                        Grilled Chicken Breast Salad
            900 calories, 60 grams of fat




   ...
Turkey Burger
Tk B                                                Sirloin St k
                                           ...
TAKE HOME POINTS
• Foods do not have to be tasteless in
  order to be healthy
• Try not to deprive yourself of the foods
 ...
Recommended Reading

“Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think”, Brian Wansink
  PhD, 2006.

“What To Eat”, Marion N...
Online Resources

• American Dietetic Association
  www.eatright.org
• American Heart Association
  www.aha.org
• USDA Die...
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Eating your Way to a Healthier You

  1. Eating Your Way to a Healthier You: From Your Kitchen to the Restaurant Sabrina Candelaria, MPH, RD, LD/N Miller School f Medicine- U i Mill S h l of M di i University of Mi i it f Miami Department of Pediatrics/ UWellness Center
  2. Health & Eating
  3. Problem Areas • Preparing foods at home • Grocery shopping • Food labels • Eating out
  4. Preparing Foods at Home PROS CONS • YOU control what is • Involves planning ahead in your food y of time • -Availability of ingredients YOU can control y your p portion size -Grocery shopping Grocery • Greater ease of • Time consuming weight management -Food preparation • $$ Cost effective (marinating, chopping) -Clean up Clean
  5. Eating Healthy at Home: What Does It Take? Healthy Cooking Strategies • Making your meals more “Heart Healthy” • Loading up on healthy foods • Equipping your kitchen with tools for healthy cooking
  6. Tips For Healthy Cooking () (1) Adopt Healthier Cooking Methods p g • Roast • Bake • Braise/stew • Grill/broil • Sauté S té • Steam • Stir-fry • Microwave
  7. Tips For Healthy Cooking (2) Fresh fruits and vegetables are ideal but not always ideal, available. Preservation methods such as canning make foods high in sodium and sugar.  “Low-sodium” varieties  Foods packed in water instead of oil  Frozen fruits and vegetables (↓ sodium) (3) Prepared seasonings are typically loaded with sodium.  Salt-free seasonings Citrus zest g  Fresh herbs & spices Lemon juice
  8. Tips For Healthy Cooking (4) Make the most of time spent cooking. Prepare more food than you will eat in one sitting Additional servings can be refrigerated (24 hours) or frozen for future use Saves time and energy (5) Keep your pantry stocked with foods for quick and easy use. Low sodium tomato sauce broths soy sauce lemon sauce, broths, sauce, juice Cooking wine (red & white) Vegetables packed i water ( li t bl k d in t (olives, artichokes) ti h k ) V Pre-chopped or minced garlic
  9. Tips For Healthy Cooking (6) Lighten up your recipes by substituting fat & cholesterol sources with healthier alternatives. Use non-stick cooking spray instead of butter or oil FYI: ½ cup of butter (1 stick)= 815 calories, 58 grams of saturated fat, and 244 grams of cholesterol - 1 oz. of oil ~2 Tbsp.= ~250 calories oil= 2 Tbsp. 250 Replace the butter in your baking with fruit purees such as bananas, applesauce & prunes (reduces calories & fat; adds fiber) When a recipe uses more than 1 egg, lower cholesterol by replacing at least 1 whole egg with 2 egg whites. -Replacing at least one whole egg  ~35 calories, 5 grams of fat, and 212 grams of cholesterol
  10. Tips For Healthy Cooking Use fat free or 1% milk instead of whole milk or 2% milk fat-free in your recipes. Substitute low fat yogurt, sour cream, or cottage cheese for regular sour cream and mayonnaise in dips and dressings. (7) Substitute white bleached flour products with whole grain alternatives to boost your fiber intake. Use whole grain starches (bread, rice, pasta, couscous, quinoa, bulgur spelt, amaranth, quinoa bulgur, spelt amaranth flaxseed meal meal, buckwheat) Use unbleached, whole wheat flour when baking -1 cup of white, bleached flour= 3g fiber 1 white -1 cup of unbleached, whole wheat flour= ~15g fiber
  11. Tips For Healthy Cooking (8) For recipes using chocolate: add tablespoons of cocoa powder and 1 t bl  dd 3 t bl f d d tablespoon of vegetable oil in place of 1 ounce of baking chocolate (or 1 square). This simple substitution can spare you ~6-7 grams of saturated fat. (9) Keep tools on hand for healthy food preparation. Non-stick cookware Kitchen-sized grill ware -Range top grill pan -George Foreman® grill Garlic press Citrus zester Food processor Cookware for steaming (double boiler, steam basket)
  12. Grocery Shopping
  13. Grocery Shopping Strategies (1) Plan meals in advance to save money, energy, and time. Include foods needed for all meals and snacks to avoid buying more than y need. yg you Post a grocery list on the refrigerator to keep track of foods as you run out. (2) Avoid shopping when you are hungry or thirsty. Leads to impulsive choices (3) Fill your cart with the healthiest choices in each food group (MyPyramid guidelines). Whole grains, whole fruits and vegetables rich in g , g color, non-fat & low fat dairy, lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, and nuts.
  14. Grocery Shopping Strategies () (4) Use food labels as a guide to healthy choices. g y -Total calories -Serving sizes -Saturated & trans fat -Sugar -Sodium S di -Fiber (5) Make the Produce Section your first stop; spend the most time in this section. Choose foods rich in color (more variety the better) variety, Buy precut fruits and veggies for convenience
  15. Grocery Shopping Strategies () (6) Start your j y journey on the p y perimeter of the store where the fresh and more nutrient-rich foods are kept: produce, dairy, meat, fish. Junk foods J k f d are typically placed i th center of th store t i ll l d in the t f the t (7) Choose real, whole, natural foods more than processed foods. df d -More nutrients, fewer preservatives, sodium, and sugar (8) Pay attention to ingredients on labels; limit/avoid foods with more than 5 ingredients, artificial ingredients, and those you cannot pronounce. g , y p
  16. Food Label Lingo US FDA, “How to Use Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label” 5%DV or less is low 20%DV or more is high
  17. Health-related Claims FDA Guidelines • Low calorie – Less than 40 calories per serving. • Low cholesterol – Less than 20 mg of cholesterol and 2 gm or less of saturated fat per serving. • Reduced – 25% less of the specified nutrient or calories than the th th usual product. l dt • Good source of – Provides at least 10% of the DV of a particular vitamin or nutrient per serving. • Calorie free – Less than 5 calories per serving. • Fat free / sugar free – Less than 1⁄2 gram of fat or sugar per serving. • Low sodium – Less than 140 mg of sodium per serving. • High in – Provides 20% or more of the Daily Value of a specified nutrient p serving. p per g • High fiber – 5 or more grams of fiber per serving.
  18. Food Labels: % Daily Value ■ Daily Values are average levels of nutrients for a person eating 2,000 calories a day. A food item with a 5% DV means 5% of the amount of fat that a person consuming 2,000 2 000 calories a day would eat eat. ■ Remember percent DV are for the entire day not just for one meal or snack. ■ You may need more or less than 2,000 calories per day. For some nutrients you may need more or less than 100% DV. Source: A S American Dietetic Association Nutrition Fact Sheet: Get Smart- i Di t ti A i ti N t iti F t Sh t G t S t Get the facts on food labels, 2006.
  19. Food Label Info U.S. Food and Drug Administration Nutrition Facts Label http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fdnewlab.html http://www cfsan fda gov/~dms/fdnewlab html
  20. Dining Out “Key to dining out healthier is to have a Key plan of attack before you get there”
  21. Dining Out Healthy () (1) Remember that food does not have to lack taste and flavor in order to be healthy. (2) Always remember: the more you are served, the more you will eat. Share an entrée Ask to h A k t have half your plate wrapped “t go” b f h lf lt d “to ” before being brought to the table (3) Eating more calories than you burn leads to weight gain; 1 lb fat= 3500 calories. Cutting out 10 calories/day= 1 p g y pound of fat lost/1 y year Cutting out 100 calories/day= 10 pounds lost/1 year Find ways to make small changes you barely notice
  22. Dining Out Healthy (4) Leave the rules of the past, where they belong… …in the past. Finishing everything on your plate You need to “get your money’s worth” get money s worth Don’t make a scene in public (asking wait staff questions/making requests) Don’t l D ’ play with your f d (bl i f d to remove oil, ih food (blotting food il removing skin, scraping off breading) (5) Don’t assume salads are always the best choice Don t High fat/calorie dressings boost up calories quickly (6) Skip the bread basket or help yourself to one basket, or, serving and ask for the rest to be removed from the table
  23. Dining Out Healthy (7) Ask for dressings and sauces to be served “on the on side”. Be assertive when ordering. (1 oz. oil= ~2 Tbsp= ~250 calories) **DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS** (8) Don’t be afraid to order appetizers as your entrée or entrée, ask for the luncheon portion at dinner. Add a side salad or non-creamy soup to add bulk. y p (9) If you are not taking leftovers, ask for your plate to be removed immediately.
  24. Dining Out Healthy (10) Red flag terms on a menu: g () • Fried • Crispy •CCreamy • Buttery • Pan-fried Pan fried • Hollandaise • Creamed • Au Gratin • In a Butter, Cream, or Cheese Sauce • In its own gravy • Casserole • Escalloped
  25. Bran Muffin Breakfast Sandwich 420 calories, 20 grams of fat 300 calories, 12 grams of fat
  26. Chicken Caesar Salad Grilled Chicken Breast Salad 900 calories, 60 grams of fat 900 calories, 60 grams fat 400 calories, 20 grams fat
  27. Turkey Burger Tk B Sirloin St k Si l i Steak 850 calories 50 grams of fat calories, 850 calories, 50 grams fat 350 calories, 20 grams fat
  28. TAKE HOME POINTS • Foods do not have to be tasteless in order to be healthy • Try not to deprive yourself of the foods you love • Learn to plan ahead (shopping, restaurant eating) • Slow it down (enjoy the experience of eating) • Set yourself up for success • Find ways to make changes that you barely notice (“no big deal”)
  29. Recommended Reading “Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think”, Brian Wansink PhD, 2006. “What To Eat”, Marion Nestle, PhD, 2006. “Eat This Not That: Thousands of Simple Food Swaps That Can Save You 10, 20, 30 pounds or More!”, David Zinczenko, Matt Goulding, 2008. “Dr. Jo’s Dining Lean: How to eat healthy when you’re not at home”, 3rd edition, Joanne V. Lichten, RD, PhD, 2007. (www.drjo.com) “American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide”, Roberta Larson Duyff, MS, RD, FADA, CFCS, John Wiley & Sons, 2002 “Intuitive Eating”, “I t iti E ti ” 2nd edition, E l T ib l MS RD and El diti Evelyn Tribole, MS, d Elyse R Resch, h MS, RD, FADA, St. Martin’s Griffin, 2003
  30. Online Resources • American Dietetic Association www.eatright.org • American Heart Association www.aha.org • USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans www.mypyramid.gov • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Fruits and Veggies More Matter” www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/ www fruitsandveggiesmatter gov/

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