Trade union notes [unfinished!!]

3,342 views

Published on

Finished notes will be published when they are done - well more if because I still have women to do

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,342
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
136
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Trade union notes [unfinished!!]

  1. 1. Trade Union (and Labour) Rights Notes<br />Rights they are campaigning for<br /><ul><li>The right for a trade union to exist
  2. 2. The right to join a trade union
  3. 3. The right to collective bargaining
  4. 4. The right to strike
  5. 5. Labour rights like:
  6. 6. Equality
  7. 7. Racially
  8. 8. Age
  9. 9. Gender
  10. 10. Wages
  11. 11. Conditions
  12. 12. Hours</li></ul>At the start of the period, trade unions didn’t even have the right to exist but some still existed, mainly as closed shops. It was during industrialisation, with the expansion of the workforce to include unskilled workers, that the problem of trade union existance took hold.<br />By the end of the period, trade unions had the right to exist, workers had the right to join a trade union and to strike but due to yellow dog contracts, Reagan and the Air Traffic Controller’s Strike, the public were against the idea of strikes, as many of the workforce were, and employers found ways to prevent people from joining trade unions, promoting welfare capitalism instead. However, labour rights were generally accepted with many Acts passed my Congress to confirm rights, like health and safety and equality.<br />Trade Unions that existed during this period<br /><ul><li>National Labor Union (NLU) 1866
  13. 13. Attempted to unify craft unions
  14. 14. Promoted working women and Blacks in the workplace (although in seperate unions)
  15. 15. Wanted 8-hour day, currency and banking reforms, end of convicted labour and immigration restrictions
  16. 16. Fell apart after a failed strike which led to a realisation for political reforms
  17. 17. Knights of Labor (KOL) 1869
  18. 18. Aimed to unite skilled and unskilled workers
  19. 19. It welcomed women and Blacks
  20. 20. Wanted 8-hour day, equal pay for women, abolition of child labour
  21. 21. Worked through reform based rather than by using strikes
  22. 22. Membership fell due to a slump in the economy (1880’s and 1900’s) and after the Haymarket Affair (1886)
  23. 23. Internal divisions led to unions to join the “Wobblies”
  24. 24. Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies)
  25. 25. More militant, using violence and sagotage
  26. 26. 1924 led to internal divisions which broke its strength
  27. 27. Molly Maguires 1873
  28. 28. American Federation of Labor (AFL) 1886
  29. 29. This replaced KOL
  30. 30. It linked all unions
  31. 31. Worked through reform and strike based methods
  32. 32. Women’s Trade Union League 1903
  33. 33. National Negro Labor Union
  34. 34. Congress of Industrial Organiszations (CIO)
  35. 35. Creation of AFL-CIO 1955
  36. 36. Coalition of Black Trade Union 1972
  37. 37. Coalition of Labor Union Women 1974</li></ul>The role of the Federal Government<br />Presidents<br /><ul><li>Hoover Laizze-faire
  38. 38. F.D Roosevelt New Deal
  39. 39. Truman Rugged individualism
  40. 40. L.B Johnson Affirmative Action
  41. 41. Reagan Conservatism</li></ul>Supreme Court<br /><ul><li>Lochner v. New York 1905
  42. 42. Said a law imposing a 10-hour day was unconstitutional</li></ul>Congress<br /><ul><li>Crimes Act 1860
  43. 43. Sherman Anti-Trust Act 1890
  44. 44. Outlawed business trusts
  45. 45. National Industry Recovery Act (NIRA) 1933
  46. 46. Wagner Act 1935
  47. 47. Fair Labor Standards Act 1938
  48. 48. Taft-Hartley Act 1947
  49. 49. Civil Rights Act 1964
  50. 50. Economic Opportunity Act 1964
  51. 51. Age Discrimination in Employment Act 1968
  52. 52. Occupational Safety and Health Act 1970</li></ul>Leaders and Organisations<br /><ul><li>Philip Randolph
  53. 53. William H. Sylvis
  54. 54. Set up the NLU in 1866
  55. 55. Thought only political reform could bring about change
  56. 56. Died suddenly which helped the NLU deminish
  57. 57. Terence Powderly
  58. 58. Preferred a non-strike position
  59. 59. Head of the KOL
  60. 60. GM and Ford
  61. 61. Carnegie and US Steel
  62. 62. Rockefellar
  63. 63. National War Labor Board
  64. 64. National Labor Relations Board
  65. 65. National Recovery Administration (NRA)</li></ul>Strikes<br /><ul><li>The Haymarket Affair 1886
  66. 66. Violence broke out between police and strikers
  67. 67. Violence was blamed on German anarchists
  68. 68. There were high suspicions about trade unions
  69. 69. Intensified divisions between skilled and unskilled workers and immigatants
  70. 70. Homestead Strike 1892
  71. 71. Pullman Strike 1894
  72. 72. Flint Strike 1936
  73. 73. Air Traffic controller’s Strike 1981</li></ul>Turning Points<br /><ul><li>Wagner Act 1935
  74. 74. Air Traffic Controller’s Strike 1981
  75. 75. New Deal and the Flint Strike 1930’s
  76. 76. Technology 1960s/ 1970s
  77. 77. Homestead and Pullman Strikes 1892+94
  78. 78. World Wars </li></ul>Themes<br /><ul><li>Employers
  79. 79. Workers themselves
  80. 80. Federal Governmnet
  81. 81. Society/ Economy

×