projetc-based learning

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  • hi-ce is dedicated to educational reform through inquiry-based curricula, learner-centered technologies, comprehensive professional development, and administrative and organizational models.
  • projetc-based learning

    1. 1. Krajcik, J. S. & Blumenfeld, P. C. (2006). The Cambridge Handbook of The Learning Science :Project-Based Learning. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press. Project-Based Learning Krajcik, J. S. C. Blumenfeld, P. & 導讀者: D10155002 陳孟訓
    2. 2. About Joseph Krajcik  He retired from active faculty status on August 31, 2011.  He received his BA and MS degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee [ 威斯康辛大學密爾瓦基分校 ] in 1973 and 1983, respectively, and his PhD degree from the University of Iowa[ 愛荷華大學 ] in 1986.  From 1977 until 1983, Krajcik was a high school science teacher in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    3. 3. About Joseph Krajcik  He served as an instructor at the University of Iowa (1983-86) and assistant professor at the University of Maryland[ 馬里蘭大學 ](1986-89).  He joined the University of Michigan faculty as an assistant professor in 1990, and was promoted to associate professor in 1993, and professor in 1998.  Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education(hi-ce). 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    4. 4. Publication Joseph Krajcik  Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P., Marx, R., Krajcik, J., Fishman, B., & Soloway, E. (2006). Standardized Test Outcomes for Students Engaged in Inquiry-Based Science Curriculum in the Context of Urban Reform. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, (in press). 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    5. 5. Publication Joseph Krajcik Smith, C. L., Wiser, M., Anderson, C. W., Krajcik, J., (in press). Implications of Research on Children's Learning for Standards and Assessment: A Proposed Learning Progression for Matter and the Atomic Molecular. Theory Measurement : Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives. 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    6. 6. Publication Joseph Krajcik  Tal, T., Krajcik, J.S., Blumenfeld, P (2006). Urban Schools Teachers Enacting Project-Based Science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching,(in press).  McNeill, K. L., Lizotte, D. J, Krajcik, J., & Marx, R. W. (2006). Supporting students' construction of scientific explanations by fading scaffolds in instructional materials. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 15(2), 153 - 191. 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    7. 7. About Blumenfeld  A Professor at the University Michigan, School of Education. of  Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education(hi-ce). 來源 http://www.soe.umich.edu/檢索日期 2013.10.24
    8. 8. Outline( 大綱 )
    9. 9. Introduction  Any teacher or parent can tell you that many students are bored in school.  But many of them assume that 1.Boredom is not a problem with the best students. 2.If students tried harder or learned better they would not be bored.
    10. 10. Introduction Critical Problems1.Acquired Superficial Knowledge 2.Not deep conceptual understanding
    11. 11. Introduction  increasing student engagement and helping them develop deeper understanding of important idea. Project-based learning.
    12. 12. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (1) Active Construction (2) Situated Learning (3) Social Interaction (4) Cognitive Tools
    13. 13. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (1) Active Construction deep understanding occurs when a learner actively constructs meaning based on his or her experiences and interaction in the world. Construct Reconstruct
    14. 14. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (2) Situated Learning the most effective learning occurs when the learning is situated in an authentic, real-world context.
    15. 15. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (3) Social Interaction The best learning results from a particular kind of social interaction.  Back-and-froth sharing ideas with others  Using ideas with others  Debating ideas with others to create a community of learners
    16. 16. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (4) Cognitive Tools Cognitive tools can amplify and expand what students can learn.  Various forms of computer software can be considered cognitive tools. [1] in accessing and collecting a range of scientific data and information. [2] by providing visualization and data analysis tools similar to those used by scientists.
    17. 17. Theoretical Background of Project-Based Learning (4) Cognitive Tools [3] by allowing for collaboration and sharing of information across sites. [4] by planning, building, and testing models [5] by developing multimedia documents that illustrate student understanding.
    18. 18. Project-Based Science (PBS)
    19. 19. PBS  Textbooks as Cookbooks.  In PBS, students engage in real, meangingful problems that are important to them and that are similar to what scientists do.
    20. 20. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment (1) Feature 1:Driving Questions (2) Feature 2:Situated Inquiry (3) Feature 3:Collaboration (4) Feature 4: Using Technology Tools to Support Learning (5) Feature 5:Creation of
    21. 21. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature 1:Driving Questions Driving questions should be (Krajcik et al.,2002) [1]feasible; [2]worthwhile; [3]contextualized[ 情境的 ]; [4]meaningful; [5]ethical[ 合乎道德德 ].  Lesson 1a:Helping Students See the Value of Driving Questions  Lesson 1b:Standards Versus In-Depth Examining of Content
    22. 22. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature 2:Situated Inquiry [1] Science instruction should mirror the scientific process. [2] Science classroom need to be considered with science. [3] In PBS classroom, students explore the driving question……p323-R-19  Lesson 2a:Helping Students Design an Investigation  Lesson 2b:Writing Conclusions and Explanations
    23. 23. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature 3:Collaboration Collaboration helps students build shared understanding of scientific ideas and of the discipline as they engage in discourse with their classmates and adults outside classroom.  Lesson3a: Creating a Discourse Community • lack skills in collaborating • changing transmission-and-acquisition
    24. 24. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature4:Using Technology Tools to Support Learning Three reasons to use technology tools in schools:(Edelson,2001) [1] they align with the practice of science, [2] they can present info. in dynamic and interactive formats, [3] they provide unprecedented opportunities to move teaching away form transmissionand-acquisition model of instruction.
    25. 25. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature4:Using Technology Tools to Support Learning These technologies help students [1] build connections among the science ideas [2] forming a deeper and richer understanding.  Lesson4a:Lake of Computer Access  Lesson4b:Time Demand of Using Technology Tools  Lesson4c:Intergrating Learning Technologies into Curriculum Materials
    26. 26. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature 5:Creation of Artifacts Learning science research shows that students learn more effectively when they develop artifacts(Blumenfeld et al., 1991). Artifacts need to address the driving questions, show the emerging understanding of students, and support students in developing understanding associated with the learning goals of project.
    27. 27. Lessons for Project-Based Learning Environment  Feature 5:Creation of Artifacts PBS focus on artifacts development for several reasons. [1] construct and reconstruct students’ understanding. [2] allows teachers to access for higher level cognitive outcomes. [3] make students’ understanding visible to others.  Lesson5a:Giving Feedback
    28. 28. Conclusion
    29. 29. Conclusion 1. They provide a model for applying project-based methods to classrooms across the curriculum. 2. Although our research has focus on project-based science, the lessons that we learned apply to any subject area.

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