3.04 Sensory functions  and disorders of the    tongue and skin       3.04 Understand the functions and                   ...
3.04 Understand the functions and    disorders of the sensory systemEssential Questions•What are the functions of the sens...
Understanding thefunctions of the tongue    3.04 Understand the functions and                                        3    ...
Understanding the           functions of the tongue   Gustatory receptors    (taste buds)                 3.04 Understand...
Taste TriviaDid you know??? An adult has on average  9,000 taste buds (a child even  10,000) More buds means the  indivi...
Structures of the tongue: taste buds              …Did you know te makes          cola           ho eating c        uce na...
Understanding the    functions of the tongue        Taste ActivityDo you like all of your taste buds?          3.04 Unders...
Disorders of the tongueGlossitisGloss   itisWhat causes glossitis?What are the benefits of good oral hygiene intreatmen...
Disorders of the tongue   Strawberry   tongue due to   scarlet fever, Kawasaki Disease  or Toxic Shock     SyndromeWhat ar...
Disorders of the tongue: Thrush What is it? Who most likely gets it? How is it prevented? How is it treated?   How are dis...
The Skin3.04 Understand the functions and                                    11  disorders of the sensory system
Understanding the sensory            functions of the skinTouchTactile corpuscles(receptors)TemperaturesensorsPain rece...
Understanding the        functions of the skinTouch            3.04 Understand the functions and                          ...
Understanding the    functions of the skin    Touch ActivityGuess what’s in the bag?        Shhh…        3.04 Understand t...
Disorders of the skin    How do you think the disorders of the skin    pictured impact the sensory function of the skin?  ...
3.04 Understand the functions and    disorders of the sensory systemEssential Questions•What are the functions of the sens...
3.04 Sensory functions anddisorders of the tongue and skin              The End              The End          3.04 Underst...
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Functions and disorders of the tongue and skin

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Functions and disorders of the tongue and skin

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  • Taste buds send stimuli through 3 cranial nerves to the cerebral cortex for interpretation. Before food can be tasted it must be dissolved in saliva. Although all taste buds can detect all four sensations, taste buds at the back of the tongue react strongly to bitter, taste buds at the front react strongly to sweet and salty, and the taste buds at the side of the tongue react strongly to sour.
  • Glossitis is often a symptom of other conditions or problems, including: Allergic reaction to toothpaste, mouthwash, breath fresheners, dyes in candy, plastic in dentures or retainers, or certain blood pressure medications (ACE inhibitors) Dry mouth, when the glands that produce saliva are destroyed (see: Sjogren syndrome) Infections with bacteria or viruses (including oral herpes simplex) Injury from burns, rough edges of teeth or dental appliances, or other trauma Low iron levels (called iron deficiency) or certain B vitamins, such as vitamin B12 Skin conditions such as oral lichen planus, erythema multiform, aphthous ulcers, pemphigus vulgaris, syphilis, and others Tobacco, alcohol, hot foods, spices, or other irritants Yeast infection in the mouth At times, glossitis may be passed down in families and is not due to another disease or event. Symptoms Symptoms of glossitis may appear quickly or slowly over time. They include: Difficulty with chewing, swallowing, or speaking Smooth surface of the tongue Sore and tender tongue Tongue color changes Pale, if caused by pernicious anemia Fiery red, if caused by a lack of other B vitamins Tongue swelling
  • The appearance of strawberry tongue is characterized by a bright red discoloration of the surface of the tongue. It also is associated with a change in the texture of the tongue; the surface of the tongue becomes bumpier because inflammation increases the size of the tastebuds. Many people describe this finding as a strawberry tongue because of similarities in color and texture between the tongue and the fruit. This condition must be differentiated, of course, from other causes of tongue staining, such as eating red candy or a red popsicle. Kawasaki Disease and toxic shock syndrome TX- depends on the cause- bacterial=antibiotics
  • Oral thrush is a condition in which the fungus Candida albicans accumulates on the lining of your mouth. Oral thrush causes creamy white lesions, usually on your tongue or inner cheeks. The lesions can be painful and may bleed slightly when you scrape them. Sometimes oral thrush may spread to the roof of your mouth, your gums, your tonsils or the back of your throat. Although oral thrush can affect anyone, it's more likely to occur in babies and in people who wear dentures, use inhaled corticosteroids or have compromised immune systems. Oral thrush is a minor problem if you're healthy, but if you have a weakened immune system, symptoms of oral thrush may be more severe and difficult to control. PREVENTION Rinse your mouth. If you have to use a corticosteroid inhaler, be sure to rinse your mouth with water or brush your teeth after taking your medication. Try using fresh-culture yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus or bifidobacterium or take acidophilus capsules when you take antibiotics. Treat any vaginal yeast infections that develop during pregnancy as soon as possible. See your dentist regularly — especially if you have diabetes or wear dentures. Ask your dentist how often you need to be seen. Brush and floss your teeth as often as your dentist recommends. If you wear dentures, be sure to clean them every night. Watch what you eat. Try limiting the amount of sugar- and yeast-containing foods you eat. These may encourage the growth of candida. TREATMENT The goal of any oral thrush treatment is to stop the rapid spread of the fungus, but the best approach may depend on your age, your overall health and the cause of the infection. Rx- antifungal
  • Your somatic sensory system is responsible for your sense of touch [source: Neuro Science]. The somatic sensory system has nerve receptors that help you feel when something comes into contact with your skin, such as when a person brushes up against you. These sensory receptors are generally known as touch receptors or pressure receptors . You also have nerve receptors that feel pain and temperature changes such as hot and cold [source: Biology Web]. You probably think of the sense of touch as relating to your skin. After all, you have about 5 million sensory nerve receptors in your skin. But you also can feel pain and pressure inside your body. Think about stomachaches and headaches. Most of your sense of touch, though, comes from external stimulus by way of your skin. So how does a quick journey from the touch receptors in your skin to your brain happen? When the touch, pain or heat sensors in your skin are stimulated, they send electrical pulses to your neurons , special cells that relay electrochemical impulses. The sensory neurons then act as a relay team, passing along the electrical pulse from neuron to neuron until it reaches your spinal cord. Your spinal cord takes the incoming signal and sends it to your brain. Once the brain receives the signal from the spinal cord, it translates the electrical signal
  • If your pain receptors have sent a message saying that a pair of tight-fitting shoes has gotten too uncomfortable, the brain knows your body is feeling pain. Your brain signals the muscles in your foot to curl up your pinkie toe away from the pain until you take your shoes off. If you've touched something very cold, your brain knows the cold receptors have been activated; you'll probably shiver in response. Likewise, if you are feeling pressure when you hug an old friend, your brain will sense the pressure of the hug around your shoulders or body. Your brain can combine messages from your sensory receptors. For instance, when you wrap a heated cotton towel around your body after stepping out of the sauna, you're using both your pressure and temperature receptors
  • Functions and disorders of the tongue and skin

    1. 1. 3.04 Sensory functions and disorders of the tongue and skin 3.04 Understand the functions and 1 disorders of the sensory system
    2. 2. 3.04 Understand the functions and disorders of the sensory systemEssential Questions•What are the functions of the sensory system?•What are some disorders of the sensory system?•How are sensory system disorders treated?•How do you relate the body’s communication tothe sensory system? 3.04 Understand the functions and 2 disorders of the sensory system
    3. 3. Understanding thefunctions of the tongue 3.04 Understand the functions and 3 disorders of the sensory system
    4. 4. Understanding the functions of the tongue Gustatory receptors (taste buds) 3.04 Understand the functions and 4 disorders of the sensory system
    5. 5. Taste TriviaDid you know??? An adult has on average 9,000 taste buds (a child even 10,000) More buds means the individual perceives more types of taste The spicy foods (like chili peppers) stimulate the pain receptors, not the taste buds 3.04 Understand the functions and 5 disorders of the sensory system
    6. 6. Structures of the tongue: taste buds …Did you know te makes cola ho eating c uce natu ral ro d th e brain p tes opia of s a sense •Produce g well-bein in a •Reduces p ! o u happy •Makes y Agreeable or disagreeable? Identify the taste bud. 3.04 Understand the functions and 6 disorders of the sensory system
    7. 7. Understanding the functions of the tongue Taste ActivityDo you like all of your taste buds? 3.04 Understand the functions and 7 disorders of the sensory system
    8. 8. Disorders of the tongueGlossitisGloss itisWhat causes glossitis?What are the benefits of good oral hygiene intreatment and prevention of glossitis? 3.04 Understand the functions and 8 disorders of the sensory system
    9. 9. Disorders of the tongue Strawberry tongue due to scarlet fever, Kawasaki Disease or Toxic Shock SyndromeWhat are othercauses of strawberrytongue?How is it treated? 3.04 Understand the functions and 9 disorders of the sensory system
    10. 10. Disorders of the tongue: Thrush What is it? Who most likely gets it? How is it prevented? How is it treated? How are disorders of the tongue relevant to health? 3.04 Understand the functions and 10 disorders of the sensory system
    11. 11. The Skin3.04 Understand the functions and 11 disorders of the sensory system
    12. 12. Understanding the sensory functions of the skinTouchTactile corpuscles(receptors)TemperaturesensorsPain receptors  Referred pain  Phantom pain 3.04 Understand the functions and 12 disorders of the sensory system
    13. 13. Understanding the functions of the skinTouch 3.04 Understand the functions and 13 disorders of the sensory system
    14. 14. Understanding the functions of the skin Touch ActivityGuess what’s in the bag? Shhh… 3.04 Understand the functions and 14 disorders of the sensory system
    15. 15. Disorders of the skin How do you think the disorders of the skin pictured impact the sensory function of the skin? Burns Dermatitis 3.04 Understand the functions and 15 disorders of the sensory system
    16. 16. 3.04 Understand the functions and disorders of the sensory systemEssential Questions•What are the functions of the sensory system?•What are some disorders of the sensory system?•How are sensory system disorders treated?•How do you relate the body’s communication tothe sensory system? 3.04 Understand the functions and 16 disorders of the sensory system
    17. 17. 3.04 Sensory functions anddisorders of the tongue and skin The End The End 3.04 Understand the functions and 17 disorders of the sensory system

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