Assessing economic impact of your special event

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Here's the presentation I gave at the South Lake CFDC Event Management and Sustainability Workshop in March 2013.

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Assessing economic impact of your special event

  1. 1. MeasuringSpecial EventEconomic ImpactMarch 25, 2013 South Lake CFDC
  2. 2. Aileen Murray• Economic development consultant• 25+ years helping businesses and communities grow• Clients includemunicipalities, counties, BIAs, workforcedevelopment councils, economic developmentagencies and for profit organizations• Specializing in strategic planning, marketing andcommunication
  3. 3. Goals for today’spresentation• Prepare credible statements on thecontribution your event makes to thecommunity• Become familiar with “acceptableresearch standards”• Determine whether economic impactanalysis is feasible• Select the most appropriatemeasurement toolshttp://www.psdgraphics.com/backgrounds/bulls-eye-target/
  4. 4. Agenda• Defining Economic Development• Tourism’s contribution to the local economy• Economic impact statements• Multiplier effect• Economic impact study components• TREIM model• Other tools• Beyond Economic Impact Measurement
  5. 5. A Quiz
  6. 6. Question #1How manyovernight touristsin Ontario attendfestivals andsporting eventsannually?
  7. 7. Question #1How manyovernight touristsin Ontario attendfestivals andsporting eventsannually?A. 7.3 millionB. 5.1 millionC. 3.8 millionD. I have no idea
  8. 8. Question #1How manyovernight touristsin Ontario attendfestivals andsporting eventsannually?5.1millionSource: Ontario major Festivals and Events Attraction Research Study, Ministry of Tourism, February 2009
  9. 9. #2 True or False?There were over3 million touristvisits to YorkRegion in 2008.
  10. 10. True!There were3,079,000total tourist visitsto York region in2008.
  11. 11. Question # 3Whatpercentage ofYork region’stourists areCanadian?
  12. 12. Question # 3of York region’stourists areCanadian81%Source: Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Geo Travel Statistics, Travel Statistics for Ontario 2008, http://www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  13. 13. Question # 3of York region’stourists areCanadian81%Domestic81%Own CD11%USA5%Overseas3%Source: Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Geo Travel Statistics, Travel Statistics for Ontario 2008, http://www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  14. 14. Question # 4True or False• The majority of jobs in the tourism sector are in theaccommodations sector.Photo http://helloimmrwright.blogspot.ca/2012/08/im-letting-you-in-on-little-secret.html
  15. 15. False!• The largest share of jobs in the tourism sector is infood and beverage services at 46%Source : http://discovertourism.ca/en/about_tourism/industry_information
  16. 16. More Facts & Figures
  17. 17. Tourism’s Contribution toOntario’s Economy$23 BillionSource: http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/quick_facts/facts.shtmlCdn Total Tourism Receipts2010
  18. 18. Tourism’s Contribution toOntario’s Economy305,400 jobs 2010Source: http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/quick_facts/facts.shtml
  19. 19. Special Events Contribution toOntario’s GDPAnnual Contribution by overnight inbound tourist tripswhere the special events were the primary reason for tripOntario Major Festivals and Events Attraction Research Study, PKF Consulting 2009$100 to $400 million
  20. 20. RTO #6 Purpose of TripPleasure29%VFR59%Business5%OtherPersonal7%VFR: Visiting Friends and RelativesSource: Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Geo Travel Statistics, Travel Statistics for Ontario 2008, http://www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  21. 21. RTO #6 Tourist ActivitiesFestivals/Fairs4%CulturalPerformances9%Museums/ArtGalleries6%Zoos/Aquariums/Botanical Gardens4%Sports Events12%Casinos9%Theme Parks7%National/Provincial Nature Parks9%Historic Sites7%AnyOutdoor/SportsActivity33%Source: Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport Geo Travel Statistics, Travel Statistics for Ontario 2008, http://www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  22. 22. York RegionTravel Statistics 2008Visits (000s) Spending$ millionsTotal 3,079 $338Domestic 2,796 $238Own CD 379 $ 52US 159 $ 41Overseas 123 $ 59Source: Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Derived from Statistics Canada data www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  23. 23. Durham RegionTravel Statistics 2008Visits (000s) Spending$ millionsTotal 2,948 $197Domestic 2,770 $148Own CD 213 $ 11US 108 $ 24Overseas 70 $ 25Source: Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Derived from Statistics Canada data www.mtr-geotravelstats.com
  24. 24. Tourism andEconomic Development
  25. 25. Economic Development“Improving the economic well beingof a community through efforts thatentail job creation, job retention, taxbase enhancements and quality oflife.”The International Economic Development Council
  26. 26. The Leaky BucketPhotoshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kelehen/6219220797/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  27. 27. Photoshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kelehen/6219220797/sizes/z/in/photostream/Local EconomyThe Leaky Bucket
  28. 28. Local EconomyExports of Goodsand ServicesTourismForeignInvestmentGoods andservicespurchasedoutside regionPayments forImports
  29. 29. Photoshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kelehen/6219220797/sizes/z/in/photostream/Local EconomyMaximize InputsMinimize Outputs(Leakage)Economic Development Goals
  30. 30. Supply & DemandTourism SystemPOPULATIONInterest in TravelAbility to TravelTRANSPORTATIONATTRACTIONSINFORMATION &PROMOTIONSERVICES• Hotels/Motels• Restaurant• RetailingDemandSupply
  31. 31. Tourism Impacts
  32. 32. Tourism ImpactsSocial• Brings in outside dollars to support communityfacilities and services that otherwise might not bedeveloped.• Encourages civic involvement and pride.• Provides cultural exchange between hosts andguests.• Facilities developed for tourism can also benefitresidents..
  33. 33. Tourism ImpactsEnvironmental• Fosters conservation and preservation of natural,cultural and historical resources.• Encourages community beautification andrevitalization.• Is a clean industry.Photo: http://bigwaveproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/sky-environment.jpg
  34. 34. Photo: http://blogs.calgaryherald.com/2011/10/30/is-the-canadian-economy-starting-to-creep-you-out/Tourism ImpactsEconomic• Helps diversify and stabilize the local economy.• Contributes to tax base.• Creates local jobs and business opportunities.• Brings new money into the economy.• Helps attract additional businesses and services tosupport the tourist industry.
  35. 35. Tourist Attractions• Artso Theatres, art galleries, museums, performing groups• Heritage Placeso Churches, historical sites• Parkso National, provincial, local, beaches, theme parks• Recreationo Events & festivals, outdoor recreation, sports, fitnesscentres• Otherso Cruise ships, casinos
  36. 36. Your Special Events
  37. 37. Types of Events• Regional Fairs• Art Shows• Entertainment Events• Livestock shows• Sporting Events• Others…
  38. 38. Why Measure Economic Impact?
  39. 39. Why Measure Economic Impact?• Accountability• Sponsorship• Funding Programs• Government support• Community support• Compare event performanceo To previous eventso To similar events in other regionso To other events in the community
  40. 40. What information?• Sponsors:total attendees andattendee profile• Local government:incremental economicimpact, communitybenefits
  41. 41. Communityresidentspay taxesTo CountyCouncilWho use them tosubsidize services,facilities & specialeventsThat attract out oftown visitorsWho spend moneyin the localcommunityCreating income andjobs in the localcommunityFor communityResidents who paytaxesWhy do municipalitieshost & sponsor special events?
  42. 42. The Economic ImpactStatementThe Megaphone Festivalbrought ______ tourists to thecommunity.These tourists generated$_______ in economicimpact, ______ jobs for thecommunity and added$______ to the local coffers.Photo: http://allareoneplus.blogspot.ca/2012/03/quote-58-pride-megaphone.html
  43. 43. Economic Impact Measurement
  44. 44. Economic ImpactCalculationEconomic Impactof Visitor Spending= # of visitors ×Averagespendingper visitor× Multiplier
  45. 45. Economic ImpactCalculationEconomic Impactof Visitor Spending= Directimpact+Indirectimpact+Inducedimpact
  46. 46. Economic DevelopmentDefinitions• Basic Industry – industries thatproduce goods and servicessold to consumers outside theregion• Non-basic industry – industriesthat produce goods andservices consumed locallyPhoto: http://www.sfl2000.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Export-box.jpg
  47. 47. Economic DevelopmentDefinitions• Multiplier – the ratio of totaleconomic activity to basiceconomic activity• Employment multiplier – theratio of total employmentimpact to direct employmentimpact
  48. 48. The MultiplierThe ripple effect from the contribution of newmoney to the community.Photo: http://beta.images.theglobeandmail.com/b19/migration_catalog/article3966214
  49. 49. The Multiplier EffectOut of Town Visitor SpendingRestaurant Motel Retail Admission /ConcessionsLocal BusinessPurchasesDirectHouseholdIncomeLocal Taxes Non localPurchasesNon localhouseholdincomeNon localtaxesLocal BusinessPurchasesDirectHouseholdIncomeLocal Taxes Non localPurchasesNon localhouseholdincomeNon localtaxesDirect ImpactIndirect ImpactInduced Impact
  50. 50. The Multiplier EffectPhotos: http://maytermthailand.files.wordpress.com/, http://www.crucell.com http://fourteenip.comDirect Indirect Induced
  51. 51. Directimpact• The impact generated in businesses that providegoods and services directly to travelers• ie. restaurants and accommodationsSource: www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/treim/treim.shtml
  52. 52. Indirectimpact• The impact resulting from the expansion of demandfrom businesses that directly provide goods andservices to travelers to other businesses or sectors• ie. Food suppliersSource: www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/treim/treim.shtml
  53. 53. Inducedimpact• The impact associated with the re-spending oflabour income and/or profits earned that servetravelers directly and indirectly• ie. shelter, food, clothing, recreationSource: www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/treim/treim.shtml
  54. 54. The Multiplier• Most impact at the centre• Manufacturing multipliers are typically larger than service industrymultipliers• Manufacturing multipliers ~ 2 to 3 net jobs for every 1 new job• Service industries <1.2 jobs for every 1 new job created
  55. 55. Economic Multipliers• Large community = larger multiplier• Small community = smaller multiplierCityCountyRegionProvinceMeasuring the Economic Impact of Park and Recreation Services, National Recreation and Park Association
  56. 56. The Tourist/ VisitorSame Day domestic tourist• Out of town trip thattakes the traveller atleast 40 km. (25 mi.)one way from home• Not for commuting or aroutine tripSource: Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Gated Events and Festivals p. 90
  57. 57. The Tourist/ VisitorOvernight domestictourist• Out of town trip of atleast one night awayfrom home• Not for commuting or aroutine tripSource: Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Gated Events and Festivals p. 90
  58. 58. Special Event TouristsSource: Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessments of Gated Events and Festivals p. 19Ministry of Tourism does not include:o Localso Time switcherso Casuals
  59. 59. Measuring Economic Impact
  60. 60. Tourism Economic Impact• Change in sales, income and jobs becausetourists came to the community and spentmoney there.Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact assessment of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  61. 61. On-Site SpendingMoney spent at the event siteincl. parking, refreshments, souvenirsGuideliness: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact assessment of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  62. 62. Tourist Spending≠TourismEconomic Impact• Remember the leaky bucket• Not all purchases are made locally• Not all vendors source locally
  63. 63. Survey Resources*Gated Events Ungated EventsEconomic ImpactEstimateGuidelines: Survey Proceduresfor Tourism Economic ImpactAssessment of Gated Eventsand FestivalsGuidelines: Survey Procedures forTourism Economic ImpactAssessment of Ungated or OpenAccess Events and FestivalsOn-site spendingestimateGuidelines: Survey Proceduresfor Assessment of On-siteSpending at Gated Events andFestivalsGuidelines: Survey Procedures forAssessment of On-site Spendingat Ungated or Open AccessEvents and FestivalsResearch Resolutions & Consulting, 2005Canadian Tourism Commission & 8 other partners including OntarioMinistry of Tourism
  64. 64. Tourism Economic ImpactStudy ComponentsAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlanGuidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact assessment of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  65. 65. ComplexityGated UngatedSingle site Multiple sitesSingle day Multiple daysMoreLess
  66. 66. Attendee CountsGated Events Ungated EventsAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlan
  67. 67. Gated EventsControlled points of entrance and exit
  68. 68. Ungated EventsAccess to event is not controlled
  69. 69. Gated EventAttendee Counts• Systematic approacho # of tickets soldAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlan
  70. 70. Ungated EventAttendee Counts• Aerial Photography• Parking Lot Counts• Parade Counts• Entrance/ Exit counters• Accommodation dataAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlan
  71. 71. Ungated EventAttendee CountsAerial Photographyo Peak volume timeso Ground counts of coveredareaso Not suitable for indoor ornight eventso Not just airplanes,o Remote control airplaneenthusiasts, tallest buildingin townhttp://rwrant.co.za/
  72. 72. Aerial Photography• Site map• Identify count zones• Identify peak attendance periods• Aerial photography• Counts from photographs• Estimates of capacity and occupancy ofcovered areas• Calculations for counting attendees• Special questions for tally questionnaireo How many days to you plan to attend theevento Which events do you plan to attend(by day)Source: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  73. 73. Parking Lot Counts• # of vehicles• Type of vehicle• Parking lot used• Number of occupantsper vehicle• # of householdsrepresented by thenumber of occupants
  74. 74. Ungated EventAttendee Counts• Parade Countso Events where parade is thepeak attendance activityo Grid count• Entrance/ Exit counterso Sample of total # attending• Accommodation datao Ask hotels to record # of visitorsattending the event• Traffic counterso Compare event vehicle trafficto non-event average trafficPhoto: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-419501/Welcome-worst-hotel-world.html
  75. 75. Not everyone countsExcluded groups• Vendors, staff, volunteers• People who attend more than once
  76. 76. Tallying attendees• Characteristics of the attendees• Local or visitors• Attendee tallieso Randomly selected stintso Randomly selected attendeeso Survey to determine if they are local, casual ortime switchersAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysis Plan
  77. 77. Tally Questions• Postal / Zip code• Type of visitoro Spectator, exhibitor, athlete, entertainer,coach, vendor, exhibitor, referee, media, sponsor, other• Days at the event• # people in your immediategroup
  78. 78. Tally Questions• Nights spent in the areao Motel, privateresidence, camping, B & B• Timing of visito Would you have come at this timeeven if the event had not beenheld?• Impact on length of stayo Did you stay longer than you wouldhave done if this event had notbeen held?• Decision to visito How important was this event inyour decision to visit on this trip?
  79. 79. Tallies &Random Sampling• Stints – unique measurement time period at yourevent• Stint sample – a randomly selected set of stintswhen you will count and/or tally attendees at yourevent• Tally interview – short interview to determineattendee characteristics (local vs. tourists)• Counts – all attendees at an event during tally stint.Source: Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  80. 80. Attendee SurveyAttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlan
  81. 81. Economic ImpactWhat is the approximate amount your immediate group willspend during your visit?Amount InGeorginaOutsideGeorginaEntry FeesRestaurants, ConcessionsGroceriesRetail shoppingLodgingGas & oilPrivate Auto expensesTaxis, rental vehiclesOthers
  82. 82. Survey Training• Survey goals and processo Objectives, objectives of the study, howto handle difficult respondents,• Implementation of the surveyo Practice interviews, respondentselection
  83. 83. Analysis Plan• How you will identify theincremental spending• (The math)AttendeeCountsTallyingAttendeesAttendeeSurveyAnalysisPlan
  84. 84. The Magic NumberRecommended minimum # of visitors/tourists to measure economic impact
  85. 85. Aerial photographycalculation1. Convert party to people from tallyo (ie 9 parties interviewed = 31 people)2. Adjust tally and aerial photo counts for exclusionso (vendors, volunteers, staff)o (ie. 10% of attendees are vendors, volunteers, staff and are removed fromtotal attendee counts)3. Adjust aerial photo counts for duplicationo If they were taken at multiple timesSource: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  86. 86. Aerial photographycalculation4. Adjust tally respondents for duplicationo (attendees for multiple days only count once)5. Expand stints to total eventso (ie. Total stints (36) ÷ sampled stints (6) = Stint weight (6.0)6. Expand weighted tallied persons to adjustedattendee countsSource: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  87. 87. Attendee calculation((Household party tally record X #of people in party)÷# of days at event)Xstint weightXindividual attendee adjustment weight(from adjusted aerial photo counts)Source: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  88. 88. Estimating attendance byplace of residenceCalculation for each place of originAdjusted Tallied Persons by Place of OriginXstint weightXindividual attendee adjustment weight(from adjusted aerial photo counts)Source: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  89. 89. Estimating attendanceby place of residenceSource: Guidelines: Survey procedures for Assessment of On-Site Spending at Ungated or Open Access Events and FestivalsWeighted, Projected Visitors, Stints 1, 2 by Place of ResidencePlace of Residence Stint 1 Stint 2 Total PercentTotal (All) 3,104 + 2,815 = 5,919 100%Local 2,341 + 1.973 = 4,314 73%Non-local – same province 473 + 421 = 894 15%Other provinces 184 + 289 = 473 8%Other country 132 + 132 = 264 4%
  90. 90. Estimating attendance byplace of residence• Apply ratios by place of resident to theinformation on spending and attendeecharacteristics
  91. 91. Which study is most suitable?Minimum 200 surveys from randomly selected tourists?YesAt least 10% attendees non-local?YesCan you estimate totalattendance?YesEconomic Impact FeasibleNoNoNoEconomicImpact maynot befeasibleCan you estimate totalattendance?NoQualitative assessment onlyYesOn-site SpendingMeasure onlyGuidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessments of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals p. 34
  92. 92. Economic Impact Decision TreeMinimum 200 surveys from randomlyselected tourists?YesAt least 10% attendees non-local?YesCan you estimate total attendance?YesEconomic Impact FeasibleNoNoGuidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessments of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals p. 34
  93. 93. On-Site Spending MeasureDecision TreeMinimum 200 surveys from randomly selected tourists?Yes NoCan you estimate totalattendance?No YesOn-site Spending Measure onlyGuidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessments of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals p. 34
  94. 94. Which study is most suitable?Minimum 200 surveys from randomlyselected tourists?YesAt least 10%attendees non-local?YesCan you estimatetotal attendance?YesEconomic ImpactFeasibleNoNoNoEconomic Impact maynot be feasibleCan you estimate totalattendance?NoQualitativeassessment onlyYesOn-site SpendingMeasure onlyGuidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessments of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals p. 34
  95. 95. On-Site Spending Survey• Vendor survey may be an easier/ more accurateassessment• May be more important to your sponsors thaneconomic impact• Definitely more important to your vendors
  96. 96. Get help• Partner with another specialevent to measure both events• Local high school, communitycollege• Event volunteers• Recruit a service organization• Hire a specialist
  97. 97. Economic Impact Analysisis not the solution when….• The event draws few people fromoutside the community(less than 10%)• Tourists attending the event arecoming to the community for someother reason• You don’t have the budget orhuman resources to provide thedata requiredGuideliness: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact assessment of Ungated or Open Access Events and Festivals
  98. 98. TREIMOntario’s Tourism Regional Economic Impact Measurement Tool• WhatEasy way to determine the economic impact of visitors and businesses spending• WhoDeveloped by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Recreation• When1st in 2004, updated in 2008• HowMulti-region input-output model,• 49 Census Divisions, 14 Census Metropolitan Areas / Census Agglomerations, 13Travel Regions, and the entire province.
  99. 99. Introduction to TREIMTourism Region Economic Impact Model• Direct, Indirect &Induced impacts• Gross DomesticProduct• Labour Income• Employment• Tax Impacts
  100. 100. TREIM Toolwww.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/treim/treim.shtmlor searchOntario Tourism Economic Impact
  101. 101. Using TREIM
  102. 102. What does it measure?Economic Impact of:• Visitor Spending• Operational Expenses• Investment Expenditures• Convention CentreActivity
  103. 103. Using TREIM: ArtXtremePhoto: http://www.kinnearandchung.com/gacg-dccc-2011/gacg-dccc-2011.html
  104. 104. Using TREIM: ArtXtreme• 550 students andteachers on day 1• 600 people on day 2• Incl 30 overnight visitors• If 10% were visitors115 visitors & 26%overnight• If 20% were visitors230 visitors & 13%overnightPhoto: http://www.kinnearandchung.com/gacg-dccc-2011/gacg-dccc-2011.html
  105. 105. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  106. 106. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  107. 107. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  108. 108. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  109. 109. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  110. 110. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  111. 111. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  112. 112. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  113. 113. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  114. 114. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  115. 115. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  116. 116. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  117. 117. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  118. 118. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  119. 119. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  120. 120. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  121. 121. TREIM: ArtXtreme
  122. 122. 115230TREIM: ArtXtreme
  123. 123. TREIM: ArtXtreme115 Visitors
  124. 124. TREIM: ArtXtreme230 Visitors
  125. 125. TREIM: ArtXtreme115 Visitors
  126. 126. TREIM: ArtXtreme230 Visitors
  127. 127. TREIM: ArtXtremeImpact by Industry
  128. 128. Other Options
  129. 129. Festival & Events OntarioEconomic Impact Study Grants (Trillium Foundation)• Economic impact and strategic alliance researchstudies for $1500 feeo 25 studies (between 2012-2014).o 20 small budget festivals (annual <$250,000)o 5 medium budget festivals (annual budget $250,000 to $500,000).• Applications open for 2013 to FEO Members• www.festivalsandeventsontario.ca
  130. 130. STEAMSport Tourism Economic Assessment Model• Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance• Sport Canada• Canadian Association of Convention & VisitorBureaus• http://canadiansporttourism.com• Free with membership to the CSTA
  131. 131. Elvis FestivalCollingwoodPhoto: http://0.tqn.com/d/gocanada/1/0/k/F/-/-/Elvis_impersonators.jpg
  132. 132. Motor Coach EstimatesRural Ethnic/Heritage Destinations(MSU 2002)• $2,415 per day trip bus• $5094 per one night bus tripWest Virginia Impact Study (2007)• $3800 per day trip bus• $7700 per one night bus tripPigeon Forge, TN Impact Study (2007)• $3250 per day trip bus• $9900 per one night bus triphttp://www.tourismcenter.msu.edu/virtualtourism/aba%20economy.pdfhttp://www.wvcommerce.org/App_Media/assets/pdf/industryinformation/reports/2006_WV_Motorcoach_Economic_Impact.pdfhttp://www.buses.org/files/Pigeon%20Forge.pdf
  133. 133. Beyond Economic ImpactLegacies of Sports Tourism• Municipal Impact –– economic development, downtownrenewal, municipal profile, media exposure, support facilities,political environment• Socio Cultural Impact –– job creation, civic pride, volunteerand leadership development, enhanced infrastructure,partnership development• Sport Impact –– enhanced sport capacity, sportdevelopment, support to local sport organizations• Tourism Impact –– increased room nights, showcasecommunity attractions, regional eventsSource: http://canadiansporttourism.com/sites/default/files/docs/clinton_sport_tourism_presentation_jan_21_blair.pdf
  134. 134. Other Measurements• Attendee Satisfaction• Attendee Profileo (Age, gender, income, media preferences, etc.)
  135. 135. Other Ministry of TourismResearch Materials• Travel Activities and Motivation Survey• GeoTravelStats – map-based tourism statistics.• Tourism Outlook• Historical Stats• Much more
  136. 136. Some Tips1. Be as accurate as you can2. Providing a range is okay.3. Recognize the differencebetween a local and a visitor4. Can you incorporate tallies/surveys into your existing eventprocess?
  137. 137. Some Tips5. Get your event partners andvolunteers onside.6. Be prepared to explain youranalysis7. Ask for help8. Play with the TREIM tool on-line.(It won’t bite )
  138. 138. "Do what you can,with what youhave, where youare."Theodore Roosevelt
  139. 139. Furtherinformation• TREIM http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/research/treim/TREIM%20Model%20Design.pdf• Ontario Major Festivals and Events Attraction Research Study, PKF Consulting 2009• Measuring the Economic Impact of Park and Recreation Services, National Recreation andPark Association• Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact assessment of Ungated orOpen Access Events and Festivals• Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Tourism Economic Impact Assessment of Gated Eventsand Festivals• Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Assessment of On-site Spending at Gated Events andFestivals• Guidelines: Survey Procedures for Assessment of On-site Spending at Ungated or OpenAccess Events and Festivals• Sport Tourism Planning Templatewww.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/publications/sport_tourism_planning_template.pdfPhoto: http://mikeduran.com/2011/02/should-everyone-get-you/
  140. 140. Thank youAileen Murray Ec.D. (F)Mellor Murray Consultingamurray@mellormurray.ca519-784-7944mellormurray

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