Employer / Community Presentation
January 2014
“Finding Good Employees”
Looking for a Good Employee?
• If I could introduce you to an employee who had
an 8% turnover rate (the national average i...
Looking for a Good Employee?

The employee I’m speaking about?
It’s a person who has a disability –
a person who is often ...
Vermont Employment Realities
The challenges of the changing demographics:

• Between 2010 and 2020, Vermont’s total popula...
Vermont Employment Realities (Cont’d)
• 22% more of our youth are leaving the State’s workforce
than in 2000. (US Census, ...
What Can Employers Do Now?
There are real challenges for Vermont
businesses to attract and retain employees
to help them g...
Where Do Employers Look?
People with disabilities are a valuable talent pool to
consider when looking to hire for your bus...
Overlooked Employment Opportunity
Despite the skills that Vermonters with disabilities
can bring to the workplace, here’s ...
Employment Rate in % of Disabled
vs. Nondisabled Vermonters
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0

Disabled
Vermonters
Nondisabled
Ver...
Missed Opportunities Costs Money
•

% of Americans with disabilities outside workplace pre-ADA: 70%

•

% of Americans wit...
People with Disabilities Have Skills
•

More than 600,000 scientists and engineers currently employed in
the US have disab...
People with Disabilities Want To Work
A Kessler Foundation survey of HR
managers and senior executives found
that…
- 62% o...
Debunking
Myths
Myths: Why Employers May Not Hire
People With Disabilities
Fears some employers may have about hiring
people with disabili...
Debunking the Myth:
It Costs Way Too Much
• In fact, there are Federal and state tax credits
and incentives for hire folks...
Debunking the Myth:
It Costs Way Too Much, cont’d.
• The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC)
-Federal tax credit for employ...
Debunking the Myth: The ADA Will
Bankrupt Me (Cont’d)
• Companies can be more profitable when they hire
people with disabi...
Debunking the Myth:
The ADA Will Bankrupt Me
• In a July 2013 Job Accommodation
Network (JAN) study, employers
reported th...
Debunking the Myth:
I Can’t Fire Someone With A Disability
• An employee with a disability who can’t perform
the essential...
Debunking the Myth:
“They” Can’t Be Expected to Perform
Their Jobs Like Other People
• Turnover rates for
employees with d...
Debunking the Myth: A Person With
A Disability Will Be Out More Than
My Other Employees
•

Industry reports consistently r...
Debunking the Myth: Once I Hire A
Person With A Disability, I’m On My Own
There are many organizations that offer support ...
Solving
The Job
Matching
Puzzle
Job Matching Involves Many Puzzle
Pieces
Job matching is…
Job Candidate
Employer

CWS Staff

Additional

Member

Resources...
Job Matching – Employer Role
Employer

How Does It Work?

Strengths:
• Jobs/work
• Experience in hiring good people
• Natu...
Job Matching – Job Candidate Role
How Does It Work?

Job Candidate
Strengths:
•Motivated by more than just money
•Experien...
Job Matching – Creative Workforce
Solutions (CWS) Staff Member Role
How Does It Work ?

CWS Staff Member
Strengths:
•Know ...
Job Matching – Available Resources
Available Resources

How Does It Work?

•Job matching consultation, assistance and
supp...
Job Matching – Available Resources
• Today unlike any time in our history low or
no cost assistive technologies are leveli...
What Can
YOU
Do?
Observation
People with disabilities have
extensive experience in
surmounting obstacles.
They only need the chance to
appl...
How Can I Easily Find Qualified,
Pre-Screened Applicants?
• Utilize disability-specific recruitment services like
Creative...
What are Helpful Strategies for Hiring
and Retaining People with Disabilities?
•
•
•
•
•
•

Show visible top management co...
What Else Can You Do to Support the
Employment of People with Disabilities?
• Explore the menu of progressive employment
o...
What Else You Can Do (Cont’d)
• Take advantage of the resources of the national
Job Accommodation Network (www.askjan.org)...
What Else You Can Do (Cont’d)
• Consider targeted recruiting; reach out to high
schools and colleges for referrals.
• Part...
What Else You Can Do (Cont’d)
• Tap into the discretionary spending power
of people with disabilities and their
families. ...
What Else You Can Do (Cont’d)
• Check out the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce’s list of “Leading Practices on
Disability Inclusio...
So, What will YOU
Commit To?
Contact Information
Please feel free to reach out to us for further
information on ways you can hire people with
disabilit...
Thank you!
Appendix: Case Studies
we can add a few as takeaways…just a thought CJL
Walgreens Study Validates Business
Case for Disability Inclusion
•

In June 2012, Walgreens Supply Chain & Logistics Divis...
Walgreens Study Validates Business
Case for Disability Inclusion (Cont’d)
• Walgreens is widely recognized and benchmarked...
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1.20.14 gcepd employer pres 2014 draft_v4 with photos

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  • That’s us! Please feel free to check into our website, which is filled with helpful information and links.
    The GCEPD is Vermont’s designated leadership and coordination group on issues related to employing people with disabilities. We look forward to working with you.
  • What if I were to tell you that I could introduce you to an employee who had an 8% turnover rate as opposed to the national employee turnover rate of almost 45%?
    And if I told you that as an employer you could receive tax incentives to hire this employee?
    Furthermore, what if I told you that you could receive state and federal financial incentives to help pay for training?
    Let me see a show of hands to indicate you would be interested.
  • I am (name, description) . . . And the employee I speak about is a person with a disability
  • Now, however, some changes in the traditional workforce has created challenges for employers.
    As an employer, you are familiar with the challenges of the changing demographics of Vermont
    According to Dr. Paul Harrington, a national expert in employment demographics related to older persons, while the total population in Vermont is expected to grow by 5.9% from 2010 to 2020, the 55+ population is expected to grow by 26.7%. He served as an advisor to the VT Governor’s Commission on Successful Aging.
  • Now that we have looked at the reality of employment in VT, let’s look at a solution. In order to survive, let alone thrive, employers must search for some creative options to meet their organization’s needs. This means taking a look at groups they may not have considered in the past. The answer to many employer needs is PWD.
  • Many of you who are members of the Chamber of Commerce are familiar with Thomas Donohue the President of the US Chamber of Commerce. He says, the following about this new source of employees for you.
  • Despite the skills that Vermonters with disabilities can bring to the workplace, here’s the reality:
    11.6% of working age Vermonters (over 46,000 individuals) have a disability.
    However:
    Only 15,900 of people with disabilities are employed, an employment rate of just over 34%.
    The employment rate of Vermonters without a disability is almost 80%.
  • The percentage of Americans with disabilities who are outside the workforce is exactly the same as it was before the ADA was passed in 1990…70%.
    As of March 2012, the poverty rate of working-age people with disabilities was 29%, compared to 13% for their counterparts without disabilities.
    A vast majority of people with disabilities say that they want to work, but government programs do not encourage labor force participation and continue to punish people for working and saving money - this costs taxpayers approximately $450 billion a year in benefits.
  • A survey of 411 HR managers and senior executives at companies with over 50 employees conducted by the Kessler Foundation and National Organization on Disability (NOD) found that…
    62% of employers said that it costs about the same to hire someone with a disability as someone without.
    A clear majority of employers thought that someone with a disability have the same sort of dedication, flexibility, ability to acquire new skills, and lack of turnover and absenteeism as someone without a disability.
    One-third of employers felt that they get even more dedication to the job from someone with a disability than someone without.
  • Below are some fears that employers may have when thinking about hiring people with disabilities:
    It costs way too much. – and the ADA will bankrupt me
    I can’t fire someone with a disability.
    “They” can’t be expected to perform their jobs like other people.
    A person with a disability will be out more than my other employees.
    Once I hire a person with a disability, I’m on my own.
    Tell the Elephant and the stake story. A father takes his young son to the circus and as they walk the elephant line the son notices that the elephants have an iron band around their right back leg tethered to a wooden stake. The son says, “Daddy, I bet that stake has to be six feet long.” The father says, “Let’s watch.” As they watched, the elephant trainer came down the line and hit each stake with a large wooden hammer and to the son’s amazement, the underground portion of the stakes was only a foot long. The father explained, “When the elephants are young they are tethered to the stake, it is enough to hold them. As they get older they are used to being tethered and while they have the strength to pull the stake out of the ground, they don’t because they don’t know that they can.” Let’s look at some of the stakes that may have kept you from hiring PWD.
  • As pointed out earlier, 70% of PWD say they need no special accommodations and if they do the cost is generally <$500. For employees who do need special accommodations, there are tax credits and other incentives available to those who hire folks with disabilities. The challenge is making certain employers know about and help them qualify for them. That’s where Cynthia Seckler can be of service to you.
    The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal tax credit available to employers who hire individuals from eligible target groups (including veterans and referrals from vocational rehabilitation) with significant barriers to employment. Each year, employers claim over $1 billion in tax credits under the WOTC program. The success and growth of this income tax credit for business is beneficial for all who participate, while increasing America’s economic growth and productivity. • WOTC reduces an employer’s cost of doing business, requires little paperwork, and applying for WOTC is simple. • WOTC can reduce an employer’s federal income tax liability by as much as $9,600 per employee hired. There is no limit on the number of individuals an employer can hire to qualify to claim the tax credit.
  • As pointed out earlier, 70% of PWD say they need no special accommodations and if they do the cost is generally <$500. For employees who do need special accommodations, there are tax credits and other incentives available to those who hire folks with disabilities. The challenge is making certain employers know about and help them qualify for them. That’s where Cynthia Seckler can be of service to you.
    The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a Federal tax credit available to employers who hire individuals from eligible target groups (including veterans and referrals from vocational rehabilitation) with significant barriers to employment. Each year, employers claim over $1 billion in tax credits under the WOTC program. The success and growth of this income tax credit for business is beneficial for all who participate, while increasing America’s economic growth and productivity. • WOTC reduces an employer’s cost of doing business, requires little paperwork, and applying for WOTC is simple. • WOTC can reduce an employer’s federal income tax liability by as much as $9,600 per employee hired. There is no limit on the number of individuals an employer can hire to qualify to claim the tax credit.
  • Lets take a hammer to some of the stakes that may have held you back from employing PWD. Often, employers think of an accommodation in terms of building a physical structure. While there are instances in which a ramp may be needed or modification of a workspace, frequently, the accommodations are not so complicated. They make take the form of allowing someone extra time to complete a project, increasing font size of print or adjusting a work schedule to name a few.
    In reality, in a recent study of 807 employers by the Job Accommodation Network (JAN), employers reported that a high percentage (58%) of accommodations cost nothing to make, while the rest typically cost $500 or less.
    74% of people with disabilities say they need no special equipment to perform their jobs.
    Source: Job Accommodation Network Study, July 2013
  • Just as with nondisabled employees, a person with a disability is expected to perform the essential functions of the job.
    An essential function means that the position exists to perform that function and that there are a limited number of employees who could complete it.
    Requiring that a chef know how to interpret recipes would be an essential function.
    If a person cannot continue to perform the essential functions of the job with or without reasonable accommodations, they are to be treated like any other employee.
    If an employer would like assistance with proper procedure, that assistance is available:
    http://www.ehow.com/info_8262621_can-cannot-physically-do-job.html http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/accommodation.html
  • Research studies have demonstrated that employees with disabilities have better retention rates than those of their nondisabled colleagues. This, of course, reduces the high cost of turnover. You should also note this critical concept - Employees with disabilities have already had to face the challenge of proving their worth. Because of their skill in handling challenges, they already have the creativity, patience and attitude that help your organization.
  • Darlene Unger’s study helps to knock this stake out of the ground. In the field research has contradicted this myth. Darlene Unger’s study helps to knock this stake out of the ground. In reality, it has been found that employees with disabilities have as good performance, attendance and safety practices as their nondisabled colleagues.
  • We want you to be successful in your employment of a person with a disability. We want the employee with a disability to be a success. Therefore, we have multiple resources available to provide you both with support and guidance. We have listed some on this slide.
  • We have shared and, I hope, dispelled some of the most common myths regarding hiring folks with disabilities.
    Support systems have been identified that are in place to help you successfully hire and retain folks who want to prove their value and contribute to your organization. have any questions, you have another ready resource.
  • Let’s take a look at what the employer brings to the table. She has the job opening and experience in identifying talent. She has support systems in place that help all of her employees usually including some level of training.
    What are her needs? She’s looking for a solid employee – someone upon whom she can depend to job the job well. She wants someone who shows initiative and is willing to learn the skills needed. Our employer also needs some support in understanding how she can include people with disabilities on her roster of excellent employees.
  • Let’s now look a the potential candidate.
    Because of his experience in overcoming obstacles, he brings to the job skills in problem-solving and persistence. Money is not the only driving factor in his equation. To be a productive colleague in a workplace that values his skills and abilities is a key motivator. He has had experience with ongoing training and education and therefore understands the value of being a lifelong learner.
    He needs a place where he can prove his worth by applying his skills and experience. He wants to work with you to address simply and creatively any obstacles that may impede success.
  • This is where the support staff can be invaluable. She knows the job candidate, his skills, what will help him be successful and how to create the win-win situation.
    She needs to have your ear and the opportunity to assess your workplace needs. To have an open, candid dialogue with you is going to allow her to help you meet your employment needs.
  • In addition to Job Matching, there are other resources available to both you and your prospective candidate. There are the tax credits we mentioned earlier. The opportunity for specialized training is available as is assistive technology. It is important to remember that the majority of accommodations cost nothing.
    What do you need to do in order to access all of these support systems?
    A little bit of paperwork that your support system can help you complete.
  • Show of Hands?
  • That’s us! Please feel free to check into our website, which is filled with helpful information and links.
    As I mentioned in the beginning of the presentation, GCEPD is Vermont’s designated leadership and coordination group on issues related to employing people with disabilities. We look forward to working with you.
  • 1.20.14 gcepd employer pres 2014 draft_v4 with photos

    1. 1. Employer / Community Presentation January 2014
    2. 2. “Finding Good Employees”
    3. 3. Looking for a Good Employee? • If I could introduce you to an employee who had an 8% turnover rate (the national average is almost 45%); • If you could receive tax incentives to hire this employee; AND • If you could receive state and federal financial incentives to train this employee, Would you be interested?
    4. 4. Looking for a Good Employee? The employee I’m speaking about? It’s a person who has a disability – a person who is often overlooked as an employment resource.
    5. 5. Vermont Employment Realities The challenges of the changing demographics: • Between 2010 and 2020, Vermont’s total population is expected to grow by 5.9% • YET the 55+ population is expected to grow by 26.7% (VT Governor’s Commission on Successful Aging, Recommendations, Dec. 2013) • Older Americans now comprise a large portion of the U.S. population; those age 65 and over equal 13% (New York Times,12/2/11)
    6. 6. Vermont Employment Realities (Cont’d) • 22% more of our youth are leaving the State’s workforce than in 2000. (US Census, 2010) • (Younger) Gen X and Y employees remain in jobs for a shorter period than their older counterparts, 4.1 years on average. (www.Achievers.com)
    7. 7. What Can Employers Do Now? There are real challenges for Vermont businesses to attract and retain employees to help them grow. Employers must look outside of the traditional sourcing pools to find employees to meet their specific needs.
    8. 8. Where Do Employers Look? People with disabilities are a valuable talent pool to consider when looking to hire for your business. “Once an overlooked talent pool, people with disabilities are contributing to the American economy in ways never imagined…” Thomas J. Donohue, President & CEO US Chamber of Commerce
    9. 9. Overlooked Employment Opportunity Despite the skills that Vermonters with disabilities can bring to the workplace, here’s the reality: • 11.6% of working age Vermonters (over 46,000 individuals) have a disability. However: • Only 15,900 of them are employed, an employment rate of just over 34%. • The employment rate of non-disabled Vermonters is almost 80%. Source: US Census Bureau – 2012 American Community Survey
    10. 10. Employment Rate in % of Disabled vs. Nondisabled Vermonters 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Disabled Vermonters Nondisabled Vermonters 2012 American Community Survey; U.S. Census Bureau
    11. 11. Missed Opportunities Costs Money • % of Americans with disabilities outside workplace pre-ADA: 70% • % of Americans with disabilities outside workplace now: 70% • March 2012: ~ Poverty rate of working-age people with disabilities = 29% ~ Poverty rate of working age people without disabilities = 13% • Most people with disabilities want to work, but government programs discourage labor force participation. • “Benefit cliff” regulations punish people for working and saving money - costing taxpayers approximately $450 billion a year in benefits paid. (Source: www.respectabilityusa.org; http://www.scribd.com/doc/158991630/NGA-PPT)
    12. 12. People with Disabilities Have Skills • More than 600,000 scientists and engineers currently employed in the US have disabilities. (National Science Foundation, 2008) • The CEOs of Ford Motors, Apple, Xerox, and Turner Television have disabilities. (“15 CEOs with Learning Disabilities”, Business Insider, May 2011) • In September 2012, nearly 220,000 permanent civilian federal government employees had disabilities – representing nearly 12% of the workforce. (U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 2013 Report on the Employment of Individuals with Disabilities in the Federal Executive Branch)
    13. 13. People with Disabilities Want To Work A Kessler Foundation survey of HR managers and senior executives found that… - 62% of Employers said it costs about the same to hire employees with and without a disability. - A clear majority thought employees with and without disabilities were equal in terms of dedication, flexibility, ability to acquire new skills, lack of turnover and absenteeism. - One-third felt that employees with disabilities show MORE dedication to the job. Source: Kessler Foundation/NOD Employer Survey, 2010
    14. 14. Debunking Myths
    15. 15. Myths: Why Employers May Not Hire People With Disabilities Fears some employers may have about hiring people with disabilities: • High cost / ADA mandates; • Inability to fire; • Low performance expectations; • Excessive absenteeism; • Lack of ongoing support channels.
    16. 16. Debunking the Myth: It Costs Way Too Much • In fact, there are Federal and state tax credits and incentives for hire folks with disabilities. • Please contact the VT Department of Labor at www.labor.vermont.gov for more details. • Vermont’s Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) Coordinator: 802-828-5250; judy.bourbeau@state.vt.us
    17. 17. Debunking the Myth: It Costs Way Too Much, cont’d. • The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) -Federal tax credit for employers who hire veterans and vocational • • • • rehabilitation clients with significant barriers to employment. Each year, employers claim over $1 billion in tax credits under the WOTC program. WOTC reduces an employer’s cost of doing business, requires little paperwork, and applying for WOTC is simple. WOTC can reduce an employer’s federal income tax liability by as much as $9,600 per employee hired. There is no limit on the number of individuals an employer can hire to qualify to claim the tax credit. (http://www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/)
    18. 18. Debunking the Myth: The ADA Will Bankrupt Me (Cont’d) • Companies can be more profitable when they hire people with disabilities. As quoted from RespectAbility USA: (MELITA SUGGESTS WE DELETE THIS SLIDE) “Hiring people with disabilities can make companies more profitable. Nationally, Walgreens has found this to be true as employees with disabilities, when aligned with their talents and interests, are more productive, loyal and have fewer work place accidents than employees without disabilities.” • Not only do people with a disability want to work, but companies can be more profitable when they hire people with disabilities. • Source: RespectAbility USA Media Campaign, 2012
    19. 19. Debunking the Myth: The ADA Will Bankrupt Me • In a July 2013 Job Accommodation Network (JAN) study, employers reported that 58% of accommodations cost $0; the rest typically cost $500 or less. • 74% of people with disabilities say they need no special equipment to perform their jobs. Source: Job Accommodation Network Study, July 2013
    20. 20. Debunking the Myth: I Can’t Fire Someone With A Disability • An employee with a disability who can’t perform the essential functions of the job . . . - with or without reasonable accommodations should be treated like any other employee. • Procedural assistance is available for employers: ~ http://www.ehow.com/info_8262621_can-cannot-physically-do-job.html ~ http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/accommodation.html
    21. 21. Debunking the Myth: “They” Can’t Be Expected to Perform Their Jobs Like Other People • Turnover rates for employees with disabilities are substantially lower than for the general workforce – 8% annually for people with disabilities vs. 45% nationwide. (Washington Mutual Insurance Study, 2003) • After Walgreens made a distribution center universally accessible and staffed it with more than 50% of employees with a disability, it experienced a 120% increase in productivity. (Greg Wasson, Walgreens CEO. Opening Plenary speech. National Governor’s Association Winter Meeting, February 2013.)
    22. 22. Debunking the Myth: A Person With A Disability Will Be Out More Than My Other Employees • Industry reports consistently rate workers with disabilities as average or above average in performance, attendance, and safety. (Darlene Unger, “Employers’ Attitudes Towards People with Disabilities in the Workforce: Myths or Realities,” Employers’ Views of Workplace Supports: Virginia Commonwealth University Charter Business Roundtable’s National Study of Employers’ Experiences with Workers with Disabilities. Edited by Darlene Unger et al., September 2002, pg. 6 ) – two reports listed here??? • DuPont found that 85% of employees with disabilities had an average/above average attendance rate compared to people without disabilities. (Auburn pub.com, 11/28/06)
    23. 23. Debunking the Myth: Once I Hire A Person With A Disability, I’m On My Own There are many organizations that offer support to companies that hire people with disabilities. Some examples include: • Vermont Division of Vocational Rehabilitation • Vermont Association of Business, Industry & Rehabilitation • Creative Workforce Solutions • VT Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired • Disability & Business Technical Assistance Center (DBTAC) – New England ADA Center • Job Accommodation Network • Vermont Developmental Disabilities Council
    24. 24. Solving The Job Matching Puzzle
    25. 25. Job Matching Involves Many Puzzle Pieces Job matching is… Job Candidate Employer CWS Staff Additional Member Resources •A partnership between the Employer and Job Candidate. •All parties bring both assets and needs to the table to create the best possible outcome for all.
    26. 26. Job Matching – Employer Role Employer How Does It Work? Strengths: • Jobs/work • Experience in hiring good people • Natural supports??? Employers •Training (although sometimes limited) Opportunities: •Hire employees who are reliable and motivated •Access to resources that possess skills and willing to learn new ones •Gain better understanding of people with disabilities
    27. 27. Job Matching – Job Candidate Role How Does It Work? Job Candidate Strengths: •Motivated by more than just money •Experience with overcoming difficulties •Multiple levels of support to assist with employment • Training and other opportunities available Opportunities: • Opportunity to prove themselves Job Candidate •Utilize their skills and learn new ones •Become part of a growing organization and productive member of the team •Receive appropriate training and support like any other employee
    28. 28. Job Matching – Creative Workforce Solutions (CWS) Staff Member Role How Does It Work ? CWS Staff Member Strengths: •Know the Job Seekers •Experience in dealing with people with disabilities • Access to many resources • Focused on Win-Win situation Opportunity: CWS Staff Member •Interest in learning about businesses to match right candidate to the right job •Gain understanding of employer’s operations and staffing needs •Open dialogue and ongoing communication to support success
    29. 29. Job Matching – Available Resources Available Resources How Does It Work? •Job matching consultation, assistance and support: http://www.cwsvt.com/about-us/contactus.html Available Resources •Job training assistance and resources Progressive Employment: http://www.cwsvt.com/hiringsolutions/our-programs.html •Tax credits: http://www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/ opptax/ •Assistive Technology: http://atp.vermont.gov/ •And much more…..!
    30. 30. Job Matching – Available Resources • Today unlike any time in our history low or no cost assistive technologies are leveling the playing field at work. • Contact the Vermont Assistive Technology Project to see how they can support the needs of your employees. www.atp.vermont.gov
    31. 31. What Can YOU Do?
    32. 32. Observation People with disabilities have extensive experience in surmounting obstacles. They only need the chance to apply their skills to the work you need done.
    33. 33. How Can I Easily Find Qualified, Pre-Screened Applicants? • Utilize disability-specific recruitment services like Creative Workforce Solutions. • These organizations can provide candidates whose skills match your job descriptions. • They also provide continued post-placement support. • Contact your local CWS Business Account Manager. Check out the CWS website for contact information: http://www.cwsvt.com/about-us/contactus.html
    34. 34. What are Helpful Strategies for Hiring and Retaining People with Disabilities? • • • • • • Show visible top management commitment Model best practices Treat employee with disability like any other employee Provide mentoring and training as with any new hire Utilize CWS employment staff member ongoing, as needed Leverage other resources to support success – employer tax credits/incentives – disability awareness training – assistive technology • Explore reasonable accommodations as needed • Allow for flexible scheduling
    35. 35. What Else Can You Do to Support the Employment of People with Disabilities? • Explore the menu of progressive employment options offered by the Creative Workforce Solutions group in your area; • Learn about best practices from other employers that have a diverse workforce - such as winners of the GCEPD Governor’s Awards. • Showcase your disability and diversity hiring practices in your annual report.
    36. 36. What Else You Can Do (Cont’d) • Take advantage of the resources of the national Job Accommodation Network (www.askjan.org). • Explore the resources of the Campaign for Disability Employment: www.whatcanyoudocampaign.org/ • Host a GCEPD-led panel of experts discussing workplace accommodations. • Create an explicit disability policy (in addition to a diversity policy)
    37. 37. What Else You Can Do (Cont’d) • Consider targeted recruiting; reach out to high schools and colleges for referrals. • Partner with Vocational Rehabilitation for placements. • Develop a pipeline through internships, mentoring, and job shadowing days. • Include disability awareness and etiquette in employee orientation and supervisory training. • Broaden your workplace culture to make it “disability friendly”.
    38. 38. What Else You Can Do (Cont’d) • Tap into the discretionary spending power of people with disabilities and their families. Do this by: – Ensuring ease of access – Marketing to the public through disability friendly websites and publications – Including people with disabilities in product and service development
    39. 39. What Else You Can Do (Cont’d) • Check out the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s list of “Leading Practices on Disability Inclusion, found at: http://www.uschamber.com/sites/default/files/reports/020 709_DisabilityInclusion_final.pdf
    40. 40. So, What will YOU Commit To?
    41. 41. Contact Information Please feel free to reach out to us for further information on ways you can hire people with disabilities for your organization: Melita DeBellis Executive Coordinator, Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities www.hireus.org 802/434-6600 melita@gcepd.org
    42. 42. Thank you!
    43. 43. Appendix: Case Studies we can add a few as takeaways…just a thought CJL
    44. 44. Walgreens Study Validates Business Case for Disability Inclusion • In June 2012, Walgreens Supply Chain & Logistics Division published an extensive peer-reviewed study of productivity, documented safety incidents and workers compensation claims for employees with disclosed disabilities compared to employees with no disabilities. • The findings validated the business case for disability inclusion. Specifically, they learned that: • People with disabilities perform equal to those without disabilities in productivity rate, accuracy and safety incident reports • People with disabilities deliver superior results, in terms of safety incident costs and rate of employee retention. – Today, people with disabilities comprise approximately 10% of its overall distribution center workforce.
    45. 45. Walgreens Study Validates Business Case for Disability Inclusion (Cont’d) • Walgreens is widely recognized and benchmarked for mainstreaming one of the nation’s largest private sector disability inclusion efforts. • Being a disability inclusion trendsetter has given Walgreens first-mover access to capable, underutilized talent. • What’s more, the study reinforces the wisdom of Walgreen’s approach, because their distribution centers have achieved greater efficiency, higher productivity and improved employee retention by proactively employing people with and without disabilities, on equal footing, side by side. Source: Walgreens 2013 Diversity and Inclusion Report

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