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Essay about War of the Worlds by Herbert George (H.G.) Wells
War of the Worlds is a novel written by Herbert George (H.G.) Wells in the year 1898. It is a story of and alien invasion that takes place in London,
England and how humanity as a whole come together in the toughest possible situation, against the odds, and in the face of adversity, and still come
out victorious despite the countless numbers of dead. Destroyed buildings and landmarks. And at times loss of hope. In this report, I will be discussing
three of the most important terms of the book: conflict, setting, and motif. The conflict, setting, and motif of War of the Worlds is: Man vs. Martian,
early 20th century London, and Death (as the motif). The first term I am going to discuss is conflict. Man vs. Martian is the perfect... Show more content
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Throughout the story, the make their way through many towns while running from the invading Martian attackers. They make their way across
England, but eventually end up in London at the end of the book where the narrator sees that the Martians have died of apparent diseases. The third
and final term I will be examining is motif. The motif I chose was death. Death is certainly the most obvious and common motifs I believe is
represented in this story. Death is literally everywhere in this book. Starting from chapter one when the civilian is incinerated by the Martian's blaster,
to the giant alien machines that crawl across planet Earth destroying any person or structure in its path. The main character visits many towns in his
attempted escape from the seemingly inevitable doom that is followed by the invasion. Death has stricken almost every town he comes across.
Whether it be a random body he sees, or a person from the group that travels with him, the narrator is almost always around death. The only time death
can be represented as a good thing is when the narrator reaches London and sees the Martians lying dead in their defeat from disease. The result or
outcome of the story is that the world tries to return to normal. Citizens begin to return to their homes, attempting to recapture any type of normality
that can be
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Gothic Horror in Susan Hill's The Woman in Black and H.G....
Gothic Horror in Susan Hill's The Woman in Black and H.G. Wells' The Red Room As with all things, the gothic horror genre of literature did not
begin at one definable point, but evolved gradually. Gothic horror evolved out of gothic fiction (as opposed to classical fiction, for example the
novels of Jane Austen), before establishing itself as a genre in its own right. However, many literary scholars and critics would point to "The Castle
of Otranto", written by Horace Walpole and first published in 1764, as the first true gothic horror novel, containing as it does many of the clichs
prevalent throughout the genre. Gothic horror novels are typified by their dark, lachrymose atmosphere of dread and fear. In fact, the key to... Show
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These are very important to the "gothic" feel, and are sometimes augmented by hidden passages and spiral staircases. In The Woman In Black, the
main location is an old, isolated, haunted house in the middle of a marsh, even supplemented with an abandoned graveyard for full gothic effect. The
castle setting of The Red Room is more traditional for the gothic horror genre, in fact it contains many classic clichs of the genre, such as suits of
amour, spiral staircases and underground tunnels. These environments are designed to build up an oppressive atmosphere, and increase the tension
even in calm, natural parts of the story. This tension and sense of an oppressive atmosphere is one of the key elements in gothic horror stories.
Everything is done to add to this atmosphere. One of the most common tricks is to create a sense of alienation and isolation. One definition of
alienation is "separation resulting from hostility," ant this is very pertinent to the gothic horror genre; in many books and stories, the narrator feels that
people aren't telling him everything, and are acting against him (though they are often working to help him), for instance in The Woman in Black,
when the landlord at the Crythin Arms is evasive about the Drablow family, Arthur Kipps says "I was curious and a little irritated by his manner," a
sentiment repeated throughout the text. In The Red
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A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The...
A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The Red Room by H.G. Wells I am aiming to look at the differences and similarities of
two writer's methods of creating tension in their stories. The two stories I am looking at are 'A Vendetta' by Guy de Maupassant and 'The Red
Room' by H. G. Wells. After I have discussed these two stories I will draw a conclusion to show what I have found. 'A Vendetta' is about a woman's
struggle to avenge the death of her son. The writer of this story uses lots of sounds in his efforts to create tension, such... Show more content on
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She also dresses in man's clothes, this also seems strange because it makes you wonder what she is doing and why she isn't wearing her own
clothes. Also the story tells us, 'The old woman returned home in the evening. That night she slept soundly.' This too creates tension because you
wonder how she can sleep when she has just killed someone and you therefore feel uncomfortable. The colours used by Guy de Maupassant in 'A
Vendetta' create tension too because colours such as black and brown are used. These colours are dark and traditionally associated with death and
evil. This creates tension because it makes the reader feel uneasy and wonder what plan the woman will concoct and if it will be evil. During 'A
Vendetta' information is revealed gradually. For instance you don't fully understand the woman's plan until the end. This crates tension because it keeps
the reader in suspense and wondering what will happen. They are also not entirely sure what she is doing throughout the story. In 'A Vendetta' Guy de
Maupassant uses words associated with loneliness such as 'alone' and 'widow'. This creates tension because it makes the woman seem like a victim and
vulnerable, therefore creating an uncomfortable and uneasy atmosphere. Now I have discussed Guy de Maupassant's techniques for creating tension I
will
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The Time Machine by H.G. Wells Essays
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
In this essay I am going to discuss Wells' use of contrast in the Time Machine. This will include contrast from the Victorian era to the future era, but
also contrast in other sections. During a lot of the book contrast is based on revealing intelligence and general lack of it. It is also shown as what the
time traveller thinks will happen and what actually does happen. A lot of these contrasts are quite regularly compared to the contrast of dark and light.
From the first page of the book we can even get a hint that the time traveller is quite arrogant, he thinks his intelligence is better than the others in his
presence, "Expounding a recondite matter to us." ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
To relish beliefs of trickery he uses the psychologists finger to press the button. As the machine went into the future or past it blew a candle out. This
is another reference to fire. There is also imagery involved of light and darkness as well as there been foreshadowing irony. This chapter also contains
contrast of knowledge and ignorance. Knowledge of the time traveller understanding what is going on and ignorance of the people watching refusing to
believe.
"lights a spill at the fire." This is how Wells' has shown that the audience believe what he is saying. When he takes the audience to look at the real
version of the time machine he takes a "lamp" with him, this once again shows a positive status of intelligence in that the time traveller knows what he
is talking about, although on the way down the dark corridor it does "flicker" which shows some doubtfulness.
We see some foreshadowing irony almost straight away in chapter three. As soon as the time traveller returns the first thing he asks is for them "to
save a bit of mutton. He's starving for some meat." As we find out this is quite ironic as when he travels into the future he does not eat any meat. This
is because no one but eloi and morlock roam the Earth and the eloi only eat fruit. The morlocks eat eloi. This is also contrast as the time traveller does
not agree with how the morlock's "harvest" the eloi and
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H.G. Wells' The Time Machine Essay examples
When the time traveler thought of the future he made assumptions that would suggest that the in the future, society would act in a progressive manner.
He believed that society would be free of disease, that the human species would be very advanced compared to the humans in his time, and that the
human beings in this society would not know fear because of their advances in technology. These assumptions are soon proven false early on when the
time traveler thought he "...had built the time machine in vain" (21). The Sphinx puts pressure on a progressive time by suggesting that society does not
progress all the time but will eventually regress. When the time traveler notices that the Sphinx, "was greatly weather–worn, and that imparted ... Show
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Relying on technology becomes associated with this utopian society, and certain problems such as laziness can arise because of this. Laziness as a
result of dependency on technology proves to be fatal. An example of this would be when one thinks about the Sphinx's riddle. At first, society finds
the answer to the riddle through one specific way of thinking and arriving at that answer, but because of technology anything originally learned can
then be referenced so that eliminates the need to remember it. Now if someone who comes from a society that is dependent on technology is asked
this riddle, he will have no way of answering the question because he would first need to look at technology for the answer. Wells suggests that this
shows that after arriving to a utopian state, a society dependent on technology can have a reduced ability to think. When the time traveler first entered
this society in the future, the first thing he noticed was the Sphinx that had its wings "...spread so it seemed to hover" (18). There are other instances in
the story where an idea is seen as just floating or hovering into the time traveler's mind. While he is thinking about how the Eloi have become
reacquainted with fear "... suddenly there came into my head the memory of meat I had seen in the Underworld. It seemed odd how it floated into my
mind..."(49). This suggests that the time traveler is
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The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells Essays
The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells gives an account of a man's descent into madness as the result of his scientific feat, invisibility. Griffin, the
invisible man, first appears as a mysterious stranger, bandaged and seeking shelter and recluse but progressively transforms into a lawless individual
with a proposition to initiate a reign of terror. The change in Griffin's character occurs due to his invisibility and the power it provides because "there
is no one, on this view, who is iron–willed enough to maintain his morality and find the strength of purpose to keep his hands off what does not belong
to him, when he is able to take whatever he wants from the market–stalls without fear of being discovered, to enter houses and sleep with... Show more
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The invisible man begins to feel limitless and superior to average man, he feels that "an invisible man is a man of power" (Wells). Being invisible
and the subsequent notion of invincibility causes the invisible man to act as he pleases as his inhibitions disappear as the fear of being reprimanded
is removed. The absence of consequences strips away the good in Griffin's nature and fosters his madness as he starts stealing from the markets and
begins his spree of breaking into houses.
However, the invisibility that Griffin viewed as power ultimately is a poison as the invisible man must sacrifice greatly for his for his power. The
invisible man schemes grand dreams that can be realized through his invisibility but discovers that "no doubt invisibility made it possible to get them,
but it made it impossible to enjoy them when they are got" (Wells 121). Because of his invisibility, the invisible man finds himself ostracized, in a
state of danger, and no longer able to enjoy everyday customs like eating lunch at a restaurant. Griffin finds himself even unable to celebrate his
discovery with others with fear of that they might steal credit for his feat or that the exposure might cause a rejection. Due to his invisible state, his
"grandest ambitions are trivialized and frustrated by the very discovery that spurred those ambitions" (Beiderwell). The anger, madness, and mania that
envelop the invisible man all stem from the abuse of his
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H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the...
H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the Victorian Era
Herbert George Wells was an English writer from the nineteenth century. He was born on September the 21st 1866 in Bromley, Kent. He first wrote
a book when he was eleven; although this was not published it was a great achievement. He won a scholarship to the school of science, but he failed
due to his other interests such as history, journalism, sociology and writing. His dad was a pro cricketer and a domestic servant. This may have had
an influence on his work like in "The Time Machine" with the class divisions. His support in socialism influenced his work especially "The Time
Machine" as he was a great supporter of Karl Marx. He ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
This is why Wells' books were popular because they were the first daring science fiction books. He was a fan of Charles Darwin which obviously
influenced his books especially "The Time Machine". Darwin talks about how humans evolved from apes and the theory of evolution. In "The Time
Machine" the Eloi and the Morlocks evolved from humans. Many things from the Victorian era influenced Wells writing "The Time Machine" including
many theories that were around at the time. And now I shall show how "The Time Machine" represents the Victorian era.
In chapter one Wells demonstrates class divisions by showing us the dinner party with the Time Traveller and his guests. The Time Traveller is
telling his guests about his tie machine and his theory behind it. The conversation they have is quite complex "Can a cube that does not last for any
time at all, have a real existence". This shows they are all highly educated. Wells illustrates us these dinner guests not as for example "Mr Jones" but
"Medical Man" or "Psychologist". This illustrates us that all these men at the dinner party were of the upper class. They are referred to by their
profession to reinforce their status. "Ingenious Paradox and trick" this shows they are also nearly all very sceptical because time travel in the Victorian
era is an anachronism. It's like having a teleporting machine nowadays. Also people of the lower class did
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Essay on Science Versus Religion in H.G. Wells' War of the...
Martians are trying to take over the world. We humans cannot defeat them. Even with our superlative weapons we are not managing to defeat the
Martians. At the ends of the novel little tiny microorganisms are managing to defeat these Martians. The key themes and ideas are Industrialization,
Imperialism and science vs. Religion. Industrialization means using off weapons or machines. This is shown in the Novel by H.G. Wells that the
Martians are killing the human race by using off their machines and weapons. Imperialism means that creating an empire like United Kingdom just is.
This is shown in the Novel by H.G. Wells that the Martians are trying to create their own empire by starting off with the great city London. Science vs.
Religion had... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Evidence:"Within the five mile circle even the great majority of people were inert". That means even the people who were the closest to the
Martians they still carried on with their daily life. That actually shows us that 'Social Order' did not change. The word 'inert' is in fact very clever
thought off because the word itself means that something does not react to something else and this is shown in the Novel by the populace not
responding to the Martians and carrying on with their normal life. H.G. Wells could think about this word because he was a biology teacher and
the word 'inert' is a scientific word. Only a few people went to that hole to have a look at it what actually happened. Evidence:"I found a little
crowd of perhaps twenty people surrounding the huge hole in which the cylinder lay". That shows us that 'Social Order' does not inert to the event
that is happening to their great city. They have a better work to do then going to a cylinder landed from another planet. 'Twenty people' is a very
low amount of people because we in this time would expect about 100 or 1000 of people 'surrounding the huge hole in which the cylinder lay',
means again that 'Social Order' does not respond to that event at all. The reaction to a modern reader to this particularly event is very dissimilar
because we at this time would all run away from the Martians. H.G. Wells did not write this in his Novel because at that time they did not had
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The Satire of H.G Wells
Few advancements in human history have made more impact on our modern world than the industrial revolution. Coupled with this leap in industry,
imperialism defined the economic political and social structure across the globe. Essentially the industrial revolution defined the means, while
imperialism dictated who would have eventual control. H.G Wells explores both imperialism and theindustrial revolution by taking them to extremes,
and through his satire reflects the specific flaws of both processes as they changed the world around him.
H.G Wells himself was a left wing socialist.Socialism essentially commands an abolition of class structure and a "collective ownership of the means of
production" (Wikipedia, Socialism). Wells interest... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
This same question of motivation can be applied to British imperialism, it is clear though that British imperialism was not motivated by necessity, but
found its impetus in the accumulation of power and resource.
The role of ethics in imperialism is also questioned. The Martians seem to have no ethical or moral concern for the humans. Wells describes the
В‘extermination' of the Tasmanians, which was conducted by humans on humans, as ruthless (Wells, 1898, p.5). This act lacks the same ethics and
morals missing from the Martian invasion. Imperialism is thus presented as an act that lacks these ethical and moral concerns.
The humans initial reaction to the Martian invasion is also of significance because Wells presents the humans as overly self confident, arrogant and to a
degree ignorant of the danger that is posed to them. The ignorance and self–confidence of humanity is presented most strikingly in the Londoners
reaction to a Sunday Sun article describing В‘massacres' and the ineffectiveness of traditional weapons against the Martians (Wells, 1898, p.20). The
notion that the Martians would be unable to move under earth's gravity was also simply accepted by the humans (Wells, 1898, p20). By presenting the
reactions to the invasion in this manner, Wells is commenting on a society that has grown complacent and too self assured. When the scale of the
invasion is known the society resorts to panic.
The arrogance of the society presented by Wells can be compared
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The Hopeless Outlook for Victorian Society in H.G. Wells'...
The Hopeless Outlook for Victorian Society in H.G. Wells' The Time Machine In the 'Time Machine', H G Wells writes about what he depicts the
future to be like. He explains in great detail his views of evolution and Dystopia. The world he has travelled to could for all he knows be another
planet. It is the definition of a Dystopia, with to opposite species living against each other, one calm and peaceful whilst the other is out to destroy
the calm species, needing to kill them to live. Wells writes about a future where technology has advanced so much that people become lazy causing
technology to go back on itself. In the first two chapters of the novel, Wells depicts the Victorian age as a... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
A time machine is a very detailed piece of work, it is also very technologically advanced. When the Time Traveller arrives in the future, he is
initially impressed by the world he finds, he is lost for words as is he is impressed with what he sees around him, "My sensations would be hard to
describe," The Time Traveller cannot describe his feelings for what he can see, perhaps this is because it is so different from what he is used to,
and Victorians are possibly not used to such a change. They live in a very ordinary world where doing the same and everything being the same all
the time is normal. The whole place seems new to him and he is not used to it. His descriptions are odd as he describes it as a "waste of beautiful
bushes and flowers," his surroundings are also described as "shadowy and mysterious." These descriptions show it is in a way peaceful, but different.
The people he meets seem to have "a certain lack of interest" In the Time Traveller, which could mean they are not alarmed by him as they have never
come across anything of any danger during the day time, maybe they feel he is of no harm as he is not attacking during the night. At first sight the
Time traveller notices huge impressive buildings built with great detail, but
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Everyone In The World Has Had Something Or Someone Relatively
Everyone in the world has had something or someone relatively close to them that has left an everlasting influence. H.G. Wells is no different than the
rest of the world. There were many events and people in his adolescent life that inspired him to become a very successful, wealthy writer. More
importantly, they inspired him to write his first, most successful novel, The Time Machine. His novel, The Time Machine, was written under the
influence of his unique childhood that sparked his interest in literature, his family and social standing that strongly affected the foundation of his work,
and from his fascination for science and the ideas of successful scientists. Wells had an interesting upbringing that influenced the highly successful...
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Most of the time, a person gets most inspiration from a person close to them, more specifically a loved one. H.G. Wells was no different. The
influence from Wells's mother and father, as well as his upbringing, is undoubtedly present throughout The Time Machine. He was born in the
Victorian era where the common folks barely made enough money to survive, and the upper class flourished with more money than anyone could
ever imagine. The Wells family happened to fall into the struggling middle class. His mother was a housekeeper, and his father was a poor
businessman. His influence from the continuous class struggle is evident in his novel, especially through his characters. H.G. Wells's family and social
life had a very big impact on his novel The Time Machine. His entire life he struggled with his social class. He portrays much of that struggle into his
novel. A reader can sense his struggle when reading The Time Machine because it is clear that Wells mocks the rich, upper class in his work. His
feelings towards the future societies are very evident in his main character, the Time Traveler. The Time Traveler was a very smart, intellectual upper
class man. In the novel, he predicts two futures for society. Though in the story, the societies are presented as the Time Traveler's predictions, they are
in fact H.G.Wells's idea of evolution of the social classes. He predicted that the rich would evolve into wonderful, intricate creatures, while the poor
would deteriorate
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The Red Room by H.G. Wells Essay
The Red Room by H.G. Wells The title 'The Red Room' immediately attracts the reader's attention; it is symbolic but leaves unanswered questions.
?What is the red room?? Is this room dangerous? Overall the title raises so much curiosity wanting us to read on and find answers to our questions.
Red is a very strong colour and is generally associated with blood, danger, warning, hell, and above all, fear, the title also shows the setting of the
story. It makes you wonder why the room is called the red room and if it is actually red. The Red Room contains all the elements of a ghost story; the
story is written to illustrate the nature of fear and is an insight into how it affects the human mind. This story contains all the... Show more content on
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?The great Red Room of Lorraine Castle, in which the young Duke had died.? The stories brought up have an effect on both the reader and the
young man in the story. For the reader it reinforces the feeling that the man is doomed and for the young man himself, it shatters his nerves and
makes him aware of all the possible dangers that could seal his fate if he enters the room. There is only one main character in ?The Red Room?,
and three minor characters. The main character is not introduced to us in any way; all we learn is that he is a 28 year old and is at this castle to
prove his manhood by staying overnight in a ?haunted room?. We do not know how he came to be at the house or whom he is trying to prove
himself to. He is, at no point in the story given a name. This is done on purpose, to create a mysterious and uneasy atmosphere, but within the first
few lines of dialogue we understand that he is a very confident and boastful man: ?It will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me.? However brave
he says he is, he carries a gun with him. This shows that he is prepared for a possible emergency, although if there was a ghost, then generally you
would be unable to shoot a ghost because the bullet would go straight through the ghost; it reinforces that he doesn?t believe in ghosts. He is rather
curious and inquisitive and is always looking for an answer which is just like the
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Essay on The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells
The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells
Both stories are Gothic mystery stories and were written around the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century. These sorts of stories
usually have a setting of a dark, abandoned and scary place. The Red Room is about a young man who visits a castle and feels he must spend a night
in a mysterious room that is suspected to be haunted. The Cone is about a woman having an affair with a man called
Raut. The story is based around the husband who is called Horrocks seeing Raut with his wife. However it is not known whether or not
Horrocks knows if his wife is having an affair with Raut.
The opening of all three stories start with dialogue and immediately help to create ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
This is because it gives the reader an idea of the person so they can visualise it for themselves, but at the same time doesn't give the reader enough
information which therefore makes the reader feel more involved in the book. For example, in The Cone it reads 'a silent grey, shadowy figure.' This
description is vague and so it doesn't give the reader a clear picture of the character, and therefore, this again creates tension because of the lack of
description. In the case of 'The Red Room' there is also a description of a man that possesses a 'withered arm.' This is an uncommon feature in any
person, even one as old as the one mentioned in the story. The reader would think that there must have been a reason why this old man has this
feature and because the reason has not been explained to the reader, he or she will be compelled to read on to find out how the old man achieved this
withered arm.
Also I believe that the descriptions of major characters and settings would add to the tension and suspense as well. This is because in giving the
reader a small but detailed description of the setting, it involves the reader more, therefore the reader feels more involved with the book and so
tension is created a lot easier. In The Red Room the sentence 'chilly echoing passage' and 'long draughty subterranean passage' draws the reader into
the story and helps them feel as if they were
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Essay On Social Commentary In The Time Machine By H. G. Wells
Suffering amongst societies classes: Social commentary in The Time Machine
Would one travel into the future if one could? H.G. Wells is the author of the science fiction novel The Time Machine. This novel was published in
1895 and impacted the science fiction genre by changing millions of peoples point of view. This was H.G. Wells first novel and is follows societies
classes during the industrial revolution. In The Time Machine, H.G. Wells, creates a social commentary by using tone, symbolism, and imagery to show
the suffering and misunderstanding of societies classes.
H.G. Wells uses tone to describe his disappointment towards the classes decline. He says, "The upper–world man had drifted towards his feeble
prettiness" (Wells 91). When using... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Wells uses symbolism to show the importance of the Morlocks and Elois.
The Elois represent the richer class. He made the Elois appear fragile, as do the wealthy. He says, "The upper world class ...the favored aristocracy"
(Wells 61). During the industrial revolution the wealthy did not work but stayed wealthy. Another symbol is the Morlocks, he says "Morlocks their
mechanical servants" (Wells 67). The lower class is represented by Morlocks. The factory workers were merely peasants. Their unattractiveness
showed their poorness. The poor worked for the rich, making their luxuries.
H.G. Wells uses imagery to show the difference in class amongst the Morlocks and Elois. He describes, "a queer ape–like figure, its head held down in
a peculiar manner..." (Wells 53). The Morlocks are very unappealing because of their horrid visual appearance. They do not look remotely similar to
the human man. The Morlocks are the lower class habitats and this shows they did not have the luxury of looking good. Wells uses terms such as
"human rats" and "human spiders". Since the Morlocks consume the Elois, Wells thinks of them more as animals instead of humans. On the contrary,
the Elois are the opposite. Wells says, "The mouths were small, with bright red, rather thin lips, the eyes were large and mild." (Wells 27). The Elois
look much more appealing and human like. Wells describe them wearing robes and sandals. Not only do they look different they also remind the time
traveler of children. The Eloi
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Essay about The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Works Cited Not Included
Time traveling, a concept known to modern man as inconceivable, but in The Time Machine, by H.G. Wells, this fathom of human fantasy has come to
life. Wells entangles a unique blend of contrasting characters, conflicts of capitalist verses laborer divisions, and foreshadowing of the destruction of
humanity to seem together this novel of visionary proportions. "The Time Machine is a bleak and sober vision of man's place in the
Universe."(McConnell Pg.1581)
Well's use of characters in The Time Machine brings a heavy sense of contrast and diversity into the story. There are five main characters around which
the story revolves. Beginning with the Eloi and the Morlocks, which are ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
The Morlocks, on the other hand from the Eloi, are the laborer and harsher branch of humanity. The Morlocks are hairy and monstrous creatures with
red glowing eyes and razor sharp teeth. "He is supprised to learn of another people, the Morlocks, ugly, fearsome, and subterranean."(Molson Pg.600)
The Morlocks live under ground in a subterranean environment running machines and underground factories. Due to their adaptations to their
underground living environment, the Morlocks only come to the upper world in the dark, for they cannot stand the glare of sunlight. "They are strange
little beings whose pallid bodies are just the half–bleached color of the worms and things one sees preserved in spirit in a zoological museum. They
are chinless, and in their faces are set great lidless, pinkish grey eyes that glow of red. At night they leave their subterranean world to hunt down Eloi
for food."(McConnell Pg.3865)
The next character is the Time Traveler himself, who remains nameless throughout the whole novel. He is an inventor with an infatuation of the future
and Darwin's theory of the fourth dimension. The Time Traveler is middle class citizen, just as Wells was in his day. The traveler is highly concerned
with the world to come and has spent years perfecting his spectacular machine. " 'It took two years to make,' retorted the Time Traveler."(Wells Pg.14)
The next
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The Effects Of Hydraulic Fracturing On The Environment
Hydraulic Fracturing is a process which uses water to crack rock formations as a means to extract natural gas or oil. This method is highly debatable
as to whether it uses too much water in areas that have fragile water sources as well as whether the process contaminates surrounding water sources.
The State of Texas is a hotspot for hydraulic fracturing because of the amount of shale formations which can produce oil and natural gas. Texas is a
dry state which often experiences severe droughts. There is debate about if Texas has sufficient water supplies to support hydraulic fracturing. Since
hydraulic fracturing is a fairly new process, there needs to be more research to determine the realistic affect it has on the environment. The... Show more
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Does fracking pollute the water of surrounding water systems to unsafe levels for human consumption? These areas will be explored throughout
this document. 1 What is Hydraulic Fracturing The United States Geological Survey Energy Resources Program defines hydraulic fracturing as "an
oil and gas well development process that typically involves injecting water, sand, and chemicals under high pressure into a bedrock formation via
the well" (Hydraulic Fracturing). The process is meant to produce fractures in the rock formations which increases the flow of oil from the bedrock
to the wells, where it can then be processed into crude oil (Hydraulic Fracturing). Despite being a fairly new method of extraction, fracking has
quickly become one of the top methods in use. 2 Water Conditions in Texas. In June of 2014, 70 percent of Texas was in drought; of that 70 percent,
21 percent was classified as being in a state of extreme or exceptional drought (Everything You Need...). In 2013, the state climatologist said part of the
cause of the drought was the climbing temperatures due to climate change (Everything You Need...). The climatologist stated that the average
temperature in the State of Texas has increased an average of 2 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1970s (Everything You Need...). Texas has experienced
several severe droughts throughout history including the droughts of the 1950s, 1984, and 1996
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The War of the Worlds, by H.G. Wells
Although it was published seventeen years after my death, the novel War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells is a work of fiction that I would take great
pleasure in reading. It would not be because of the futuristic tales of creatures from Mars that would make it so enjoyable, but instead the major
themes that present themselves in the novel. It would be quite easy to discover that many of my ideas manifested themselves in Wells' work. He drew
many of his inspirations and ideas from our mutual friend, and his mentor, Thomas Henry Huxley. War of the Worlds helped perpetuate my work in a
literary and fictional fashion, something that I greatly appreciate. I am Charles Darwin and although my passion is natural science, I have a feeling that
this ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
For instance, the Martians have heat ray guns, something that the humans have not fathomed yet. The Martians use these guns to their fullest power,
and destroy everything around them with a simple zap. In my theory, it is always the more evolved species that comes out victorious. It would appear,
with their seemingly superior intelligence, that the Martians would be the obvious victors. They seemed to have everything planned out for their
journey to Earth, even the fact that gravity would have a significant effect on them so they developed the tripod machines. In the novel itself, the
Martians are referred as the higher intellectual beings. In chapter eleven, the narrator "began to compare the things to human machines, to ask [himself]
for the first time in [his] life how an ironclad or a steam engine would seem to an intelligent lower animal," inferring that the humans are the lower
intelligent animals.
So, the Martians win because they have been around longer and they are much smarter, right? Wrong! This is where Wells truly proves his ability as a
writer and storyteller. The somewhat obvious choice to win is thrown through a loop, thus losing the fight. The Martians end up dying off because they
have been exposed to "micro–organisms," something they have never encountered before because they "have never appeared on Mars or Martian
sanitary science
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The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Signalman by Charles...
The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Signalman by Charles Dickens `'The Red Room' by H.G Wells and 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens are
two short stories set in the later 19th century ('The Red Room' 1896, 'The Signalman' 1860s). 'The Red Room' is a Gothic horror story while 'The
Signalman' is a story containing many elements of Gothic horror from the earlier 19th century. They both mention the supernatural although 'The
Signalman' is questioning it and 'The Red Room' is a story made to prove that there is no such thing as the supernatural. H. G Wells created fear and
suspense in 'The Red Room' in many ways. He raises the suspense level mainly through the personalities of the three old custodians, with language,
description... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Another phrase that raises questions in the reader's mind and excites them is when the old woman says 'This night of all nights!'. This makes the
reader think what is so unique about tonight. And the descriptions of the three old people appearances and their actions increases the level of fear,
suspense and disgust. One of which was, 'the old people were trying to enhance the spiritual terrors'. This phrase comes back to whether there are
ghosts haunting the house or not. One of the most important descriptions in this story was the word 'atavistic' which is a word meaning ancient and as
if from another supernatural place, showed that the narrator thought that they might be beings of the supernatural, which also shows he is losing
reason. Another part of the story that helped in many ways to make readers at the edge of their seats and frightened was when the narrator was in the
Red Room. When the candles start going out increases the fear and suspense level tremendously. The two phrases from that part of the story that
helped was when he said 'as if the wicks had been suddenly nipped between a finger and thumb' and 'an invisible hand seemed to sweep out the two
candles' makes the reader think
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War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Essay example
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
Homo–Superior?
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells is a fiction story written about war and mankind's coming of age. It is also a philosophical novel with many deep
meanings underlying the shallow looking one–hundred–eighty–eight page book.
The subject of this novel is Science Fiction and there are not many that can even compete with Wells in terms of how superior his word descriptions
are. He simply does wonders with the imagination of the reader.
Obviously the whole book is about the struggle mankind faces, but it is not always with aliens, they are actually more of a good way to represent what
Wells really believed. He believed man is dominant, yet should remember how big the universe is ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
In this case the setting is perfect on account of the humans having a small sense of hope in their machinery, but not enough technology to really
compete.
Characters are not a big part of this book. The main one, who never reveals his name, is the only one who in fact does not always go with the
craziness of the public. He does have his moments of running away screaming and hiding, but he learns more about himself, mankind, and the aliens
than anyone else in the book. He has loved ones in England and hates the aliens for what they do to his home, yet he understands what the aliens are
trying to do. First person is a good way to write this kind of book because the reader knows exactly what a regular Joe would be thinking at a time like
this. Another reason Wells is such a great author.
Other characters are the aliens, who seem to be ugly heads that talk with their minds. The physical characteristics they possess are far different from
humans and they never communicate with the humans.
The last character worthy of note is the artillery man the main character meets towards the end of the book. The two seem to agree on the way things
will work out, and both would rather live than die fighting. They play many games together, eat and talk and even spend the night out in the English
countryside together.
Without this man, the book does not exist and there is no story.
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Themes in The Invisible Man by H.G Wells
The Invisible Man has many possible themes. There are multiple examples of different themes in the novel. Most of them can almost fall under the
same idea. The main theme for the novel is how excessive greed can have unintended consequences. The main character, Griffin, goes mad with the
power of being invisible. It gets to the point that he is not even trying to just stay hidden anymore, he is just trying to cause as much mayhem in the
country as possible. One of the first instances of greed is when he starts to take advantage of Mrs. Hall, the woman who owns the Coach & Horses
Inn. Mrs. Hall mainly feels bad for him at first because she thinks he is very hurt or injured in some sort of way due to him wrapping his head up.
Griffin keeps... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Soon all over the town burglaries start to occur. In the middle of the night the people who are being robbed can hear someone in their house, but
when they search around there is no one to be found. So since the incident with Mr. Cuss and all these burglaries, the townspeople start to point
fingers are Griffin. The Hall's even send a person after Griffin to perform an exorcism thinking he is a witch or something that has to do with
magic. After a while Griffin does not pay his bill at the inn for a few days, Mrs. Hall wants an explanation for it. He even tries to give her more
money but she refuses it. Now earlier in the novel him paying for his rent with the money he stole was only real use for the money. Now that he
cannot even give Mrs. Hall any more money, he has no use for the money he has stolen whatsoever. After she asks for an explanation, he removes
all of his clothes to show how he invisible. Tons of people come to inn to see what is going on, soon a man comes to take him in for questioning
about all of the burglaries that have been going on all around the town. Griffin becoming exposed to the entire town now has caused him to flee to
the country or farm area. Once again he has been punished in a way for the things he has done. He definitely could have gone around having to
leave the town. He got way to greedy and careless about his actions. The only way he is trying to fix his problems are by violence or just idiotic
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Hg Wells Research Paper
H.G. Wells
H.G. Wells, the Father of science fiction, was a liberal thinker who set the literary world ablaze with his sheer creativity. He gave form to many of
the ideas of the future, and a chaotic family life shaped him. H.G. Wells was a man of many influences, who impacted the people of his time, and
left a legacy that remains today. He grew up to be the enigmatic man he was because of his family. H.G. Wells grew up in the lower middle class
under constant threat of poverty (brittania.com,). His father owned a hardware store, but more money came in from his cricket playing. Incidentally,
his mother appeared to do all work in his family. He had two older brothers. Marriage came with its own influences He married his cousin Isabel Mary
Wells with whom ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Surprisingly, his first published book was a Textbook of Biology. His first novel,The Time Machine, was met with immediate success. The Wonderful
Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, and The War of the Worlds quickly followed it. Wells also wrote numerous essays and articles at the time.
Unfortunately, he did not stick with science fiction, instead choosing to write comic novels of the lower middle class. Not only did he write about the
future; he also made several correct predictions. H.G. Wells is sometimes known as the father of futurism (biography.com). He managed to predict
World War II (biography.com). He also predicted the tank, military aircraft, and the atomic bomb (biography.com). The modern idea of a Martian
comes from The War of the Worlds. H.G. Wells was a man who pushed the limits of imagination. From a poorly educated boy to one of the greatest
authors of all time truly is a truly astounding change. Influenced by his surroundings, he created worlds unto himself. He truly shaped the ideas the
future and left those who knew him in awe.
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The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G....
The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G. Wells
'To be denied of information as a reader is far more powerful than to know the truth.'
In this assignment I will be looking at the two short stories written in the 1800's: "The Red Room" by H.G.Wells where a man goes into an apparently
haunted room and although he is warned by other old characters he does not listen and the tension builds up as he goes into the room where fear gets
the better of him in a room which might not be haunted in the end. The other short story is "The Signalman" by
Charles Dickens. In The signalman a man lives separated from the real world living a lonely life as a signal man at a train station and thinks he might
be being visited by ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
The structures of the two stories are structured to create and sustain suspense. Both Dickens and Wells try to build up suspense in the beginning of
the stories and to add to the tension the stories end with mystery and lead you to your own interpretation of what could have happened. The
Signalman opens with the quote 'Halloa! Below there' this short, but effective line becomes very decisive as the story goes on. We don't know whose
speaking and so creates tension already. The man he is shouting at below looks round to face the tunnel 'Looked down the line'. Any normal person
would look upwards in response to this. Dickens is creating the unexplainable which builds up the tension and suspense. It is the Described that The
Signalman thinks the narrator is a ghost and visa versa, 'The monstrous thought came into my mind as I perused the fixed eyes and the saturnine face,
that this was a spirit, not a man'. This immediately hints the involvement of the supernatural which can build suspense and mystery to the story.
Commenting on the atmosphere around him the narrator tells that 'it struck chill to me, as if I had left the natural world.' The end of The Signalman
is full of mystery after the suspense is built through out. When the narrator went in the morning to the signalman's box and finds him dead, under the
'danger light' peacefully it is very strange and mysterious because he knew his job very well and was very safe 'I should
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The Effects of Social Isolation in the Invisible Man by...
Social Isolation, a state or process in which persons, groups, or cultures lose or do not have communication or cooperation with one another, often
resulting in open conflict. In H.G Wells' 1897 novel The Invisible Man, the main character, Griffin, is socially isolated due to a condition that has
forced him to stay out of the scrutinizing eye of society .As the novel progresses, the effects of social isolation begin to take form in Griffin's actions
and become more pertinent with each event that occurs. These actions show the effects of social isolation throughout the course of the novel.
The beginning of Griffin's social isolation begins early in his life. Griffin is albino, meaning that he has little to no pigmentation in his skin, eyes,
and hair. This condition makes it exceptionally challenging for Griffin to be a cohesive member of society, so in order to avoid the eminent
rejection that he believes awaits him if he tries to join society, he chooses to become an introvert. "The expression a "fish out of water" reminds us
that every animal is adapted to a habitat" (Pinker 374). Griffin does not have a habitat to adapt to because he lives outside of society and has no one
to help him adapt. At this point Griffin is able to be diagnosed with a form of social loneliness due to his feelings of being an outcast (Gelinas 4). After
Griffin is isolated from society for a short period of time, his anger starts to progress into something that even he cannot control. As the novel
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Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by...
Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce
The Victorian era, spanning from 1830–1901, was a period of dramatic change with the rapid extension of colonialism through Africa, Asia and the West
Indies making England a world power and relocating the perceived centre of western civilisation to London. Advances in industry, science, technology,
architecture, medicine and travel were among these changes as well as the growing interest, among the masses, in the occult, supernatural and life.
H.G Wells' book "The Red Room" is the first I will examine. The story begins when a young scientist sets out to prove that the "Red Room" in a castle is
... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
Both "vastness" and "ocean" make the reader feel lost and fearful of the unknown activities and size of the room. Other words like "mystery" and
"suggestion" add to create the effect of fear and suspense. Many other words such as "omens", "spiritual", "ghosts", "witches", "shadows", "echoes",
"haunted", "spectral" and "subterranean" are piled on the reader to create a sense of fear, vulnerability and death.
Next is "The Signalman" by Charles Dickens, which is about a visit from a ghost. The setting for this story is very old, depressing, dingy and gloomy
but the scenery around the signalman isn't reflected in his personality. His "box" is located underground next to the railway line. Straight away the
setting seems to be weird as it's descending down, as if almost entering hell, "zigzag path descending down". I think this because most nice stairways
are straight and go up, not uneven. The writer also describes the place as a "great dungeon"; this says to me that it's a place of death and torture
because those are the words I would think of when "dungeon" is mentioned. Also it says there was a "gloomy red light, and the gloomier entrance to a
black, in whose massive architecture there was a barbourus, depressing and forbidding air". This makes the reader think that this
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Comparing The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Darkness Out...
Comparing The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Darkness Out There by Penelope Lively
The "Red Room" was the earlier of the two stories written in 1896 by H.G. Wells and "The Darkness Out There", written by Penelope Lively was
published in1984.
The titles of both stories suggest that fear or horror will play a part. "The Darkness Out There" generates an eerie feeling by not defining a specific
threat but leaving it open to the imagination. "The Red Room" is not as scary but the use of red often shows danger or fear and this is why it has been
used here.
H.G. Wells does not give his main character a name as it is written in the first person. Penelope Lively gives the girl, Sandra, a name but it ... Show
more content on Helpwriting.net ...
In "The Darkness Out There" you are immediately introduced to Sandra. "She walked through flowers, the girl, ox–eye daisies and vetch and cow
parsley" this is a very beautiful setting and everything is perfect. We are also introduced briefly to characters who we later meet again, Mrs Rutter
("She's a dear old thing") and Pat who, although she is not described as very nice looking, runs a "Good neighbours' club" for children. As the story
opens Sandra is on her way to help Mrs Rutter with one of the others from the club although she does not know who that will be.
We are suddenly told about "Packers End and immediately it is clear that it is not a nice place, it was where a German plane had come down
during the war and it was said that people still heard the pilots talking. "You didn't go by yourself through Packers End if you could help it, not after
teatime, anyway." Packers End is described as a "rank place, all whippy saplings and brambles and a gully with a dumped mattress and a bedstead and
an old fridge. And somewhere, presumably, the crumbling rusty scraps of metal and cloth and … bones?"
"The Red Room" however begins in an old dark castle and you are immediately plunged into the story with descriptions and introductions happening
along the way.
The story does not start in The Red Room but in a communal room with a table. This
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The Effect Of Sonic Logs On The Petroleum Industry And The...
Logging is a method which has been used over a period of time to better understand subsurface parameters and reservoir conditions. The Acoustic or
Sonic log is one such method which is used in combination with density and neutron logs in order to determine these parameters. Full–waveform
acoustic logging has advanced significantly in both theory and application in recent years, and these advances have greatly increased the capability of
log analysts to measure the physical properties of formations (Paillet et al 1992). This report focuses on the basic application of sonic logs in the
petroleum industry and the current advances made in their application. It is also explained how porosity of the rocks are obtained from shaly
formations using sonic logs.
The principle of sonic logging involves a transmitter and a receiver wherein a signal is sent from the transmitter and the amount of time taken until it
has reached the receiver is recorded. The speed of sound in the subsurface depends on the elastic properties of the rock matrix, the porosity of the
formations, fluid content and pressure of the formation (Petroleum Transactions, Members AIME 1958). Sonic logging is carried out after the well has
been drilled. Background: History of Sonic Logs
Sonic logs were first introduced in the 1920s as a part of surface seismic techniques in in oil and gas exploration. In the beginning there was an obvious
interpretation problem between the time and depth correlation. Although the
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Time Machine by H.G. Wells Essay examples
Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Works Cited Missing In 1895, Victorian Britain was very much Great Britain– 'the workshop of the world.' Since the Industrial Revolution
technological advancement had changed the face of the country (shape, structure and appearance). Heavy industry demanded fossil fuels and
therefore there was a heavy demand for mine workers. Growing transport demands led to new roads being built. Life in 802,701 seemed very
different to that of 1895, it was a time of easy going and a very laid back time. Everything about this time was different ' ... Show more content on
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The Eloi live off a life of pleasure and are the over–landers, they are very small and fragile with a very weak character 'Their hair, which was
uniformly curly came to a sharp end at the neck and cheek; there ears were singularly minute. The mouths were small, with bright red, rather thin lips,
and the little chins ran to a point. The eyes were large and mild,' that was a quote from the book in which Wells describes the Eloi in a very detailed
fashion.
The Morlocks were the masters of the land and these used to be the exploited labourers, they were the mine and factory workers who worked in
appalling dark conditions. The Morlocks feed off of the Eloi which is a class of cannibalism, they have total control over the Eloi which is totally
the opposite to when Wells wrote this book, the Morlocks, the workers, had no say in what went on all they were there to do was to work hard in
appalling conditions. The Morlocks are ugly looking creatures and work underground in dark surroundings, they are subterranean beings and they
have totally adapted to this environment, in the book Wells describes them as 'small, white moving creatures with large bright eyes' he says it looked
like a 'human spider.' The Morlcoks eat the Eloi as that is there only source of food ' Clearly, at some time in the Long Ago of human decay the
Morlocks food had run short. Possibly they had
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Essay about War Of The Worlds by H.G. Wells
War Of The Worlds by H.G. Wells As the Martians fire their deadly heat rays, destroying towns and cities will anyone survive against the
overwhelming odds? What were the Martians doing here? This could not have been a friendly visit, so what were their intentions? In H.G. Wells War
of the Worlds the humans' instinct to survive overcomes threats to their existence. When faced with the unknown the human instinct for survival gives
us only two options, fight or flight. When the unknown plumes of fire were first spotted shooting from Mars it attracted many scientists, and it was
also the same year that Mars was close enough to Earth to allow scientists to observe it with telescopes from that era. It was not until the... Show more
content on Helpwriting.net ...
They too wanted to survive. The army had decided that when a cylinder falls it must be destroyed. "New plans were formed to destroy the
object before it opened" (24) but the right munitions were needed to accomplish the task. The warship "The Thunder Child" was
sent in to help in the fight because it had large guns and that were capable of destroying large objects. "The Thunder Child" waited in the
harbour for the Martian fighting machine to come close enough and instead of firing would ram it. The reason for knocking the Martian fighting
machine over is because the Navy had already known that guns and heavy weaponry could not destroy the Martians fighting machine. The water had
destroyed the first Martian fighting machine and they would try to accomplish the same task. The many soldiers that managed to escape had to find a
place to hide and one "pushed on, wet and shivering to the nearest house." (29) Other soldiers that did not want to take the risk of flight
"hid under dead horses for a long time, peeping out furtively across the common" (33) in hopes that the Martians would leave. People
returning to their homes found soldiers retreating, hiding or dead. The soldiers cared about other people because those returning home were told to
leave because "you may be hurt if you cross the canal." (22) Soldiers
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Destruction of a Great City in The War of the Worlds by...
In 1898, H G Wells wrote "The War of the Worlds," a novel that envisioned the destruction of a great city and the slaughter of its inhabitants. The
invaders were Martians, but aliens were not needed to make this devastation a reality. In a few years after the publication of the book, human beings
would play the part of inhuman pillaging with the realization of war and its effect toward society.
There has never been a war where no one was killed. From the beginning, man has always been engaged in hostilities. Suffering and losses become a
daily part of life in the front lines. Soldiers are reduced to expendable objects and losing dignity is present in every soul. There are no substitutes to
the pains that war creates. How does one ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
They feel that the world is becoming a dangerous place day by day. Their reactions are sudden and quick. Anxiousness marks their days. The sudden
flash of light, the roll of thunder, and an abrupt sound is a messenger of death to them. They are prone to lose connection with the present when faced
with situations that provoke their responses to danger. When silence engulfs them, visions of horror hark back. Civilians have also played a major role
in these conflicts. The constant threat of murder lies in the deep recesses of one's thoughts. Ruin, torture, and slaughter dominates the minds of ethnic
minorities. Minorities become the target by the impoverished majority. No one will be so confident to believe that every war is just and necessary.
There is a common notion that under modern conditions peace cannot be guaranteed except on the basis of an equal scale of armaments and this may
be the cause of stockpiling arms. Justice, common sense, and the recognition of man's cry for dignity call for a cessation of arms and the decrease of
violence. Furthermore, the eradication of nuclear heads, elimination of land mines, and the decrease of small arms such as semi–automatic rifles and
hand grenades will greatly reduce the constant threat of brutality. A nation full of missiles will less likely offer a place of security for its citizens and
every gunshot is an act of larceny to those whose cries are ignored. Thus, the
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H.G. Wells' Novel The War of The Worlds Essay
H.G. Wells' Novel The War Of The Worlds Successfully Creates A Thrilling Climate Of Terror Which Often Reflects Late Victorian Insecurities.
Discuss This Statement With Reference To The Purpose And Craft Of The Author– 1994 Words H.G. Wells' novel "The War Of The Worlds" depends
upon late Victorian insecurities to generate a thrilling climate of terror. Wells feeds off of the politics at that point in time, the ethics and beliefs of his
contemporaries and also the sense of false pride and arrogance that white Victorians had considering that they were top of the natural selection
hierarchy. He produces this climate of terror not only through the content of his writing, but by his use of language, structure and imagery.... Show more
content on Helpwriting.net ...
Many Britons feared this idea of a technologically advanced war at the time, as Britain was in a naval race with Germany. Germany was
challenging Britain's navy because Britain's navy was the best in the world, and one of the main causes of Britain having such a vast empire. Britain
were aware of the envy that Germany had, and were therefore fearing the fact that Germany may be secretly planning a war, much like the Martians
silently planned an attack on Earth. Wells' also wrote about Victorians losing their faith in religion and the church. Some Victorians believed that god
was punishing them as a world war was looming and some even doubted his existence, as there was no proof for it. To illustrate this, Wells created the
curate as a highly religious character who had faith in god and also questioned why god had brought this war upon them. The following quote
illustrates this, when the curate said "The end! The great and terrible day of the Lord! When men shall call upon the mountains and the rocks to fall
upon them and hide them––hide them from the face of Him that sitteth upon the throne!". This may have been an attempt by Wells to voice his opinion,
saying that
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H.G. Wells: †The Red Room’ and †The Cone’ Essay
H.G. Wells: 'The Red Room' and 'The Cone'
The short stories 'The Red Room' and 'The Cone' by HG Wells both heavily feature tension and suspense. The author of the two stories, HG Wells, uses
a number of techniques to create this mood and atmosphere to keep his readers interested.
HG Wells immediately creates an air of mystery from the outset of 'The Red Room' when he introduces the 'man with the withered arm'. This grotesque
description of the man's features, combined with his ambiguity due to having no name given to him, helps create this air of mystery and suspense. The
term 'tangible ghost' helps create suspense too, as you normally associate the term 'ghost' with the supernatural, which ... Show more content on
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This imagery draws the reader in as you visualise this sudden, paranormal 'illumination', lighting the room, creating a mysterious atmosphere and a
tense anticipation in the reader due to this description of the setting.
HG Wells, however, uses a different technique to create a suspenseful mood in 'The Cone' by using his descriptions of the setting to foreshadow the
climax of the story. He describes the 'big ironworks' as a 'turmoil of flames and seething molten iron', foreshadowing to the murder of Raut when he
is in 'turmoil' himself and falls into the furnace and is engulfed in a 'swift breath of flame'. The constant reference to 'fire' and 'flame' sets a nervous
expectation within the reader that the fire of the furnace is going to have some sort of play in the outcome of the story.
Another way in which Wells generates a suspenseful mood and atmosphere is through his use of dialogue.
When HG Wells has the narrator of 'The Red Room' say 'There is neither ghost of Earl nor ghost of Countess in that room, there is no ghost there at
all; but worse, far worse –'. This creates a tense feeling within the reader because you wonder what could this thing worse than a ghost be. This
example of Wells' use of dialogue adds to the air of mystery of 'The Red Room', as the way in which the narrator conveys his point is very mysterious
to a Twenty–First Century
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Essay on H.G. Wells: The Odd man Who Shaped a Genre
H.G. Wells: The Odd Man Who Shaped a Genre
Herbert George (H.G.) Wells was a man of many passions both strange and ordinary, but despite his eccentricities, he impacted science fiction and
fantasy in a profound and noticeable way. As a man who bridged the entertainment gap between the upper and lower classes that existed at the time,
H.G. Wells books felt right at home from the 1890's clear through the Lost Generation (British Writers, Vol. 6, 226). Fantastical plots and relatable
language aside, he was also what one might consider a normal man. Despite his being repulsed by monogamy, he wasn't afraid to speak his mind and
indulge in worldly pleasures (British Writers, Vol. 6, 227).
Born Herbert George Wells on Saturday, 21 September... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
While there, he began one of his many odd relationships with his cousin Isabel, marrying her in 1891 and divorcing her just after his departure from
the college in 1894. A year later he published his worksThe Time Machine, The Wonderful Visit, and The Stolen Bacillus, earning him a grand total of
ВЈ792 that year (British Writers, Vol. 6, 226). Between the years of 1901
–1914, while continuing to gain popularity in his writing, and continuing to
study various scientific theatres, Wells had four children: George Phillip Wells (who went on to co
–author several books, including the extension to
H.G. Wells autobiography H.G. Wells In Love), Frank Wells, Anna
–Jane Blanco–White, and Anthony West (Murray, 12).
In the years that followed, going through the first (in which Wells was already too old to fight) and second world wars, Wells became disillusioned
to war, and instead of themeing his works after wars and political events like many of the writers at the time tended to do, instead focused on
educating mankind ("penguinclassics.co.uk"). This is evidenced by his earlier publishing of the Textbook of Biology, and his continual interview of
public figures such as Theodore Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, Vladamir Lenin, and Maxim Gorki, showing his interest in getting as much information as
possible to the people of the world, be it scientific or otherwise (Murray, 11–13). He even wrote essays and nonfiction books such as, Anticipations of
the Reaction of Mechanical and
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
Fracking Is Not The Cleanest Alternative For Oil...
Fracking The term, "fracking" has existed for nearly a half century and has always had the negative connotations of being unclean and the source for
many environmental issues and adverse health effects. The massive oil deposits recovered by modern hydraulic fracturing can be considered as the oil
boom of the twenty–first century and with new methods, safety procedures, and technology, potential hazards can be reduced or even eliminated. Due
to the many possible hazards of the fracking process, it has initiated much political discussion at the state and federal levels of government, while
inciting concern of local citizens. Fracking is not the cleanest alternative to oil reclamation, but has improved drastically with the introduction of...
Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
However, fracking fluid is not the only questionable aspect of fracking, included is land and infrastructure degradation, physiological harm to local
citizens, utilization of legislation loopholes, and the secrecy of fracking fluid formulas within the industry. Nonetheless, the negative attributes of
fracking, such as fracking fluid dispersal and other environmental issues are outweighed by the vast economic gains and can be mitigated by a system
of regulations and development of new technologies for the industry. The fracking industry will only increase in size, so much so that reclamation of
shale gas is called "eminent shale gas revolution. British Petroleum [BP], for instance, expects global shale gas production to grow six–fold from 2011
to 2030. Shale gas production in the United States already accounts for roughly 30 percent of the nationwide total a growth rate up from only 4
percent in 2005" (Sovacool, 251). It has also been estimated that more than "80 percent of the natural gas wells developed in the United States over the
next ten years are expected to require fracking and it is projected that by 2035 natural gas wells will represent more than a 75 percent share of the
domestic supply" (Bleiwas, 68). Natural gas exploration began in the late 1940s' to extract the natural gas located in underground reserves. The
process consisted of digging a vertical well into the ground to release gas trapped in relatively
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
The Relationship Between Eloi and the Morlocks in The...
The Relationship Between Eloi and the Morlocks in The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
The Time Machine was inventively written as a social critique of the Victorian Era in 1895 by Herbert George Wells, the father of modern science
fiction. Wells used the novel to get the messages across on social and political problems at the time when London was on top of the world. The novel
criticized mainly on communism, imperialism, capitalism, as well as Social Darwinism. The Time Machine was an adventurous science fiction novel
about a Time Traveler, the inventor of a time machine who traveled to the year 802,701 A.D. In the course of his journey, he saw the degeneration and
the separation of mankind through ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
The sight of the Elois reminded the Time Traveler of communism, which was one of the themes in the novel, since they were all alike. Not only did
they have delicate features of human but they were also portrayed as being childlike. "Then in a flash, I perceived that all had the same form of
costume, the same soft hairless visage, and the same girlish rotundity of limb," (Wells, 31). Regardless of their physical similarities, the Time Traveler
could not distinguish the age and the gender of the Elois since they all looked the same. He believed that this was a result of the world without
troubles or fear, in which he criticized.
The theme of degeneration was apparent in this novel especially with the Elois. Not only were they weak and childlike, but they also did not work
or study. All they did was to play, sleep, eat, bath, and laugh all day long. The Elois were stupid and lazy. They also could not concentrate for a long
period of time and they did not have much interest as seen when the Time Traveler was trying to tell them where he was from or to teach them his
language. "You see I had always anticipated that the people of the year Eight Hundred and Two Thousand odd would be incredibly in front of us in
knowledge, art, everything. Then one of them suddenly asked me a question that showed him to be on the
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
Analysis Of The Book ' Animals By Simon Rich
Synthesis Essay Animals by Simon Rich is an outstanding short story which takes a unique perspective on the everyday life in a classroom. The
story is written from the point of view of a hamster who spends his tortured life entrapped in a cage. From the first point in this story it is clear that
the purpose of the writing is not to understand the hamster, but rather to analyse the different actions of the people, and to discover that how they act
towards the hamsters reflects on their character. It is curious to view the everyday interactions of people through a different set of eyes, that is done by
humanizing the narrator's perspective. Based on the actions of the many people and the treatment of the class pet, the author suggests that human
nature is very much a product of the financial circumstances a person is subjected to. There are a couple of key characters in this story, the first of
which is Simon. He is just one of many strikingly similar students in homeroom 2k. Simon, like many of the students is irresponsible, and
unsympathetic towards the hamsters. Simon jeopardizes the lives of the hamsters by attempting to joke around instead of completing his assigned task,
which involves giving them food and water. The majority of the story takes place in a private school, and the reader can make the assumption that the
student's parents are wealthy. The author portrays simon as well as the other kids in a bad light, that they are, by default, poorly behaved and somewhat
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Essay examples
H.G. Wells, author of mind blowing novel The War of The Worlds, used foreshadowing and both external and internal conflicts to show the theme those
humans should not assume that they are the superior race. Wells was the author of more than 100 books, almost half of them nonfiction, published
over a span of 52 years.
In Bromley, Herbert George Wells was born. Wells started Morley's school in Bromley when he was seven, when he was 14 he became apprenticed
to a draper. In 1883, Wells rebelled against their fate. Herbert arrived at up park when he was 14. Some events that propelled Wells in a new direction
are in his autobiography called "starts in life". When Herbert George Wells was young his mother taught him how to read, Mostly using big... Show
more content on Helpwriting.net ...
In 1890 Wells got his degree from the University of London. After Wells married his cousin Isabel, he started teaching in London at a
correspondence college, as radical causes increased his criticism because more explicit. Wells had a public life; he expressed those opinions through
syndicated articles. In July 1889, Wells got second degree honors in zoology after his science examination. In September 1884, Wells attended the
normal school of science at the age of 18. H.G. Wells moved to London when he was 22. Wells studied elementary biology and under Professor
Huxley. Wells was in his prime at the beginning of the new century. Wells became a science teacher until 1893. Tuberculosis led Wells to become a
full–time writer. During most of World War 2 Wells was home in London. Wells met Vladimir Lenin in Russia after the war. Wells told the world of
his experiences and impressions. Wells told of the Soviet experiment. H.G. Well's father was a talented professional cricket player. H.G. Wells took 5
pounds and moved to London in 1888. Wells traveled back and forth from France during the Wars. (Abrams 13+; Hall 310+; "Herbert George
Wells–Biography"; Kunitz 1492; O'neal 1630; "Wells, H. G." 122). The idea of the future of humanity greatly fascinated Wells. People refer to Wells
as the father of modern science fiction. One of Wells best known novels "The Time Machine" was his first
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
Differences between H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds"...
ENG 3c Culminating Assignment
The War of the Worlds: Book and movie adaptation comparison
By
Magaidh Gordon
Part A: Summary
Text:
The War of the Worlds (1898), a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, is the first
–person narrative of an unnamed protagonist's (and his brother's)
adventures in Surrey and London as Earth is invaded by aliens. Written in 1895, it is one of the earliest stories that details a conflict between mankind
and an extraterrestrial race. Despite its age, this book is still a widely–enjoyed classic, and has inspired nearly 50 movies, 6 Broadway productions, and
2 musicals (one of which I personally own) in its time! The War of the Worldspresents itself as a factual account of the Martian ... Show more content
on Helpwriting.net ...
The narrator escapes detection by hiding in the coal–cellar.
The Martians eventually depart, and the narrator is able to head toward Central London. He once again encounters the artilleryman, who briefly
persuades him to cooperate in a grandiose plan to rebuild civilization underground. But after a few hours the narrator perceives the lunacy of this
plan and the overall laziness of his companion and abandons the artilleryman to his delusions. Heading into a deserted London, he is at the point of
despair and offers his life to the aliens when he discovers that the invaders have died from microbial infections to which they had no immunity, since
"there are no bacteria in Mars." The narrator realises with joy that the threat has been vanquished. The narrator suffers a brief breakdown of which he
remembers nothing, he is nursed back to health by a kind family, and returns home to find his wife, whom he had given up for dead. The last chapter,
entitled "Epilogue," reflects on the significance of the invasion and the "abiding sense of doubt and insecurity" that it has left in the narrator's mind.
Movie:
Although many movies have been inspired by H.G. Wells' The War of
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
H.G. Wells' The Time Traveler Essay
H.G. Wells' The Time Traveler H.G. Wells lived at the turn of the century. During this time, there was a huge gulf between the rich and poor. "The
Time Traveller's" socialist tone highlights the injustices of the British class system. Well's protagonist, imagines the future to consist of a perfect
society, where everyone is equal and technology is extremely advanced. This view is based on mankind's continual advances during his lifetime, so he
assumes we will continue to advance in the future. "The Time Traveller" reflects H.G Well's opinions about mankind, and acts as a warning for what
could happen in the future if society does not embrace equality and humanity. When the Time Traveller arrives in the future, he notices
... Show more
content on Helpwriting.net ...
He fails to acknowledge the obvious dilapidation and decay in the city. The Time Traveller first notices the Morlocks, in the night. There were
several of them carrying something up the hill. He thinks they are ghosts, which is a common rationalisation for phenomenon, which is
frightening or alien to us. This is true in the Eloi's case. They are scared of the dark, as they do not know what is out there. The Eloi sleep together
because they are scared of the dark because as this is when the Morlocks come out to prey. The Time Traveller then develops a second theory that
the Morlocks were the working class of his age and the Eloi the upper class. This is a complete contrast to his communist theory, it is infact, a form
of capitalism. He imagines that the Morlocks came to live underground because the upper class, the Eloi did not want to be socially involved with
the lower class. Slowly over time, the lower classes places of work began to develop underground, until there was no need for the workers to go
above ground. Like animals, they adapted to their surroundings and developed into the Morlocks. The Time Traveller believes that the Morlocks are
the working classes who struggle beneath the more affluent Eloi. This belief seems to be confirmed by the Eloi's appearance. They are above
ground and are dressed in rich clothes and never do any work. The Morlocks are a dull white, and have "strange large greyish red
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
The Stolen Bacillus by H.G. Wells Essay
The Stolen Bacillus by H.G. Wells
This is a story set in the 19th century people had dress codes which reflected your status in society. The dress code was formal and quite severe it
was almost as if the longer your top hat the higher up the rank you are in importance in society. In this story we meet a man who wants to help the
society and quality of living whereas the other wants to destroy order as he is what's known as an anarchist. This is someone who is feels that people
should be responsible for there own actions and decisions meaning they govern their own lives. In the 19th century anarchists were seen as political
agitators and sometimes violent. As in this story where we will see a man desperate and willing to go to ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ...
The anarchist is very absurd into thinking that by drinking the potion that he would be able to infect the whole population in the story it says, "He
went walking down Waterloo Bridge jostling as many people as possible trying to infect them". The real blow must have come to the anarchist when
he realises that that was the wrong phial. We know that this is true as the scientist says," it is a phial which turns things blue so that is the only thing he
will achieve".
The two characters in the story who are set on big ideas are the
Scientist and the anarchist. The scientist is pompous and idealistic and likes the sound of his own voice, as he kept on talking about the bacillus. The
anarchist is high flown and self–important, there is a bit of self pity and neglect but then again he is pathetic and can't seek attention in any other way.
There is definitely an element of frustration in his life as no–one listens to his ideas or what he has to say this is partly the reason why he wants to
cause chaos with the stolen bacillus. We know this as it says, "The world shall hear of him at last. All those people who laughed neglected him and
preferred other people to him will consider him now".
The characters in the story who show reality are the wife of the scientist and the cabbies.
The wife is very down to earth she is more concerned about the way
... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...

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Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
 

H.G. Wells' The Time Machine Essay

  • 1. Essay about War of the Worlds by Herbert George (H.G.) Wells War of the Worlds is a novel written by Herbert George (H.G.) Wells in the year 1898. It is a story of and alien invasion that takes place in London, England and how humanity as a whole come together in the toughest possible situation, against the odds, and in the face of adversity, and still come out victorious despite the countless numbers of dead. Destroyed buildings and landmarks. And at times loss of hope. In this report, I will be discussing three of the most important terms of the book: conflict, setting, and motif. The conflict, setting, and motif of War of the Worlds is: Man vs. Martian, early 20th century London, and Death (as the motif). The first term I am going to discuss is conflict. Man vs. Martian is the perfect... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Throughout the story, the make their way through many towns while running from the invading Martian attackers. They make their way across England, but eventually end up in London at the end of the book where the narrator sees that the Martians have died of apparent diseases. The third and final term I will be examining is motif. The motif I chose was death. Death is certainly the most obvious and common motifs I believe is represented in this story. Death is literally everywhere in this book. Starting from chapter one when the civilian is incinerated by the Martian's blaster, to the giant alien machines that crawl across planet Earth destroying any person or structure in its path. The main character visits many towns in his attempted escape from the seemingly inevitable doom that is followed by the invasion. Death has stricken almost every town he comes across. Whether it be a random body he sees, or a person from the group that travels with him, the narrator is almost always around death. The only time death can be represented as a good thing is when the narrator reaches London and sees the Martians lying dead in their defeat from disease. The result or outcome of the story is that the world tries to return to normal. Citizens begin to return to their homes, attempting to recapture any type of normality that can be ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 2. Gothic Horror in Susan Hill's The Woman in Black and H.G.... Gothic Horror in Susan Hill's The Woman in Black and H.G. Wells' The Red Room As with all things, the gothic horror genre of literature did not begin at one definable point, but evolved gradually. Gothic horror evolved out of gothic fiction (as opposed to classical fiction, for example the novels of Jane Austen), before establishing itself as a genre in its own right. However, many literary scholars and critics would point to "The Castle of Otranto", written by Horace Walpole and first published in 1764, as the first true gothic horror novel, containing as it does many of the clichs prevalent throughout the genre. Gothic horror novels are typified by their dark, lachrymose atmosphere of dread and fear. In fact, the key to... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... These are very important to the "gothic" feel, and are sometimes augmented by hidden passages and spiral staircases. In The Woman In Black, the main location is an old, isolated, haunted house in the middle of a marsh, even supplemented with an abandoned graveyard for full gothic effect. The castle setting of The Red Room is more traditional for the gothic horror genre, in fact it contains many classic clichs of the genre, such as suits of amour, spiral staircases and underground tunnels. These environments are designed to build up an oppressive atmosphere, and increase the tension even in calm, natural parts of the story. This tension and sense of an oppressive atmosphere is one of the key elements in gothic horror stories. Everything is done to add to this atmosphere. One of the most common tricks is to create a sense of alienation and isolation. One definition of alienation is "separation resulting from hostility," ant this is very pertinent to the gothic horror genre; in many books and stories, the narrator feels that people aren't telling him everything, and are acting against him (though they are often working to help him), for instance in The Woman in Black, when the landlord at the Crythin Arms is evasive about the Drablow family, Arthur Kipps says "I was curious and a little irritated by his manner," a sentiment repeated throughout the text. In The Red ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 3. A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The... A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The Red Room by H.G. Wells I am aiming to look at the differences and similarities of two writer's methods of creating tension in their stories. The two stories I am looking at are 'A Vendetta' by Guy de Maupassant and 'The Red Room' by H. G. Wells. After I have discussed these two stories I will draw a conclusion to show what I have found. 'A Vendetta' is about a woman's struggle to avenge the death of her son. The writer of this story uses lots of sounds in his efforts to create tension, such... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... She also dresses in man's clothes, this also seems strange because it makes you wonder what she is doing and why she isn't wearing her own clothes. Also the story tells us, 'The old woman returned home in the evening. That night she slept soundly.' This too creates tension because you wonder how she can sleep when she has just killed someone and you therefore feel uncomfortable. The colours used by Guy de Maupassant in 'A Vendetta' create tension too because colours such as black and brown are used. These colours are dark and traditionally associated with death and evil. This creates tension because it makes the reader feel uneasy and wonder what plan the woman will concoct and if it will be evil. During 'A Vendetta' information is revealed gradually. For instance you don't fully understand the woman's plan until the end. This crates tension because it keeps the reader in suspense and wondering what will happen. They are also not entirely sure what she is doing throughout the story. In 'A Vendetta' Guy de Maupassant uses words associated with loneliness such as 'alone' and 'widow'. This creates tension because it makes the woman seem like a victim and vulnerable, therefore creating an uncomfortable and uneasy atmosphere. Now I have discussed Guy de Maupassant's techniques for creating tension I will ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 4. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells Essays The Time Machine by H.G. Wells In this essay I am going to discuss Wells' use of contrast in the Time Machine. This will include contrast from the Victorian era to the future era, but also contrast in other sections. During a lot of the book contrast is based on revealing intelligence and general lack of it. It is also shown as what the time traveller thinks will happen and what actually does happen. A lot of these contrasts are quite regularly compared to the contrast of dark and light. From the first page of the book we can even get a hint that the time traveller is quite arrogant, he thinks his intelligence is better than the others in his presence, "Expounding a recondite matter to us." ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... To relish beliefs of trickery he uses the psychologists finger to press the button. As the machine went into the future or past it blew a candle out. This is another reference to fire. There is also imagery involved of light and darkness as well as there been foreshadowing irony. This chapter also contains contrast of knowledge and ignorance. Knowledge of the time traveller understanding what is going on and ignorance of the people watching refusing to believe. "lights a spill at the fire." This is how Wells' has shown that the audience believe what he is saying. When he takes the audience to look at the real version of the time machine he takes a "lamp" with him, this once again shows a positive status of intelligence in that the time traveller knows what he is talking about, although on the way down the dark corridor it does "flicker" which shows some doubtfulness. We see some foreshadowing irony almost straight away in chapter three. As soon as the time traveller returns the first thing he asks is for them "to save a bit of mutton. He's starving for some meat." As we find out this is quite ironic as when he travels into the future he does not eat any meat. This is because no one but eloi and morlock roam the Earth and the eloi only eat fruit. The morlocks eat eloi. This is also contrast as the time traveller does not agree with how the morlock's "harvest" the eloi and ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 5. H.G. Wells' The Time Machine Essay examples When the time traveler thought of the future he made assumptions that would suggest that the in the future, society would act in a progressive manner. He believed that society would be free of disease, that the human species would be very advanced compared to the humans in his time, and that the human beings in this society would not know fear because of their advances in technology. These assumptions are soon proven false early on when the time traveler thought he "...had built the time machine in vain" (21). The Sphinx puts pressure on a progressive time by suggesting that society does not progress all the time but will eventually regress. When the time traveler notices that the Sphinx, "was greatly weather–worn, and that imparted ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Relying on technology becomes associated with this utopian society, and certain problems such as laziness can arise because of this. Laziness as a result of dependency on technology proves to be fatal. An example of this would be when one thinks about the Sphinx's riddle. At first, society finds the answer to the riddle through one specific way of thinking and arriving at that answer, but because of technology anything originally learned can then be referenced so that eliminates the need to remember it. Now if someone who comes from a society that is dependent on technology is asked this riddle, he will have no way of answering the question because he would first need to look at technology for the answer. Wells suggests that this shows that after arriving to a utopian state, a society dependent on technology can have a reduced ability to think. When the time traveler first entered this society in the future, the first thing he noticed was the Sphinx that had its wings "...spread so it seemed to hover" (18). There are other instances in the story where an idea is seen as just floating or hovering into the time traveler's mind. While he is thinking about how the Eloi have become reacquainted with fear "... suddenly there came into my head the memory of meat I had seen in the Underworld. It seemed odd how it floated into my mind..."(49). This suggests that the time traveler is ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 6. The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells Essays The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells gives an account of a man's descent into madness as the result of his scientific feat, invisibility. Griffin, the invisible man, first appears as a mysterious stranger, bandaged and seeking shelter and recluse but progressively transforms into a lawless individual with a proposition to initiate a reign of terror. The change in Griffin's character occurs due to his invisibility and the power it provides because "there is no one, on this view, who is iron–willed enough to maintain his morality and find the strength of purpose to keep his hands off what does not belong to him, when he is able to take whatever he wants from the market–stalls without fear of being discovered, to enter houses and sleep with... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The invisible man begins to feel limitless and superior to average man, he feels that "an invisible man is a man of power" (Wells). Being invisible and the subsequent notion of invincibility causes the invisible man to act as he pleases as his inhibitions disappear as the fear of being reprimanded is removed. The absence of consequences strips away the good in Griffin's nature and fosters his madness as he starts stealing from the markets and begins his spree of breaking into houses. However, the invisibility that Griffin viewed as power ultimately is a poison as the invisible man must sacrifice greatly for his for his power. The invisible man schemes grand dreams that can be realized through his invisibility but discovers that "no doubt invisibility made it possible to get them, but it made it impossible to enjoy them when they are got" (Wells 121). Because of his invisibility, the invisible man finds himself ostracized, in a state of danger, and no longer able to enjoy everyday customs like eating lunch at a restaurant. Griffin finds himself even unable to celebrate his discovery with others with fear of that they might steal credit for his feat or that the exposure might cause a rejection. Due to his invisible state, his "grandest ambitions are trivialized and frustrated by the very discovery that spurred those ambitions" (Beiderwell). The anger, madness, and mania that envelop the invisible man all stem from the abuse of his ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 7. H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the... H.G. Wells' Time Machine and Its Relativity with the Victorian Era Herbert George Wells was an English writer from the nineteenth century. He was born on September the 21st 1866 in Bromley, Kent. He first wrote a book when he was eleven; although this was not published it was a great achievement. He won a scholarship to the school of science, but he failed due to his other interests such as history, journalism, sociology and writing. His dad was a pro cricketer and a domestic servant. This may have had an influence on his work like in "The Time Machine" with the class divisions. His support in socialism influenced his work especially "The Time Machine" as he was a great supporter of Karl Marx. He ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... This is why Wells' books were popular because they were the first daring science fiction books. He was a fan of Charles Darwin which obviously influenced his books especially "The Time Machine". Darwin talks about how humans evolved from apes and the theory of evolution. In "The Time Machine" the Eloi and the Morlocks evolved from humans. Many things from the Victorian era influenced Wells writing "The Time Machine" including many theories that were around at the time. And now I shall show how "The Time Machine" represents the Victorian era. In chapter one Wells demonstrates class divisions by showing us the dinner party with the Time Traveller and his guests. The Time Traveller is telling his guests about his tie machine and his theory behind it. The conversation they have is quite complex "Can a cube that does not last for any time at all, have a real existence". This shows they are all highly educated. Wells illustrates us these dinner guests not as for example "Mr Jones" but "Medical Man" or "Psychologist". This illustrates us that all these men at the dinner party were of the upper class. They are referred to by their profession to reinforce their status. "Ingenious Paradox and trick" this shows they are also nearly all very sceptical because time travel in the Victorian era is an anachronism. It's like having a teleporting machine nowadays. Also people of the lower class did ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 8. Essay on Science Versus Religion in H.G. Wells' War of the... Martians are trying to take over the world. We humans cannot defeat them. Even with our superlative weapons we are not managing to defeat the Martians. At the ends of the novel little tiny microorganisms are managing to defeat these Martians. The key themes and ideas are Industrialization, Imperialism and science vs. Religion. Industrialization means using off weapons or machines. This is shown in the Novel by H.G. Wells that the Martians are killing the human race by using off their machines and weapons. Imperialism means that creating an empire like United Kingdom just is. This is shown in the Novel by H.G. Wells that the Martians are trying to create their own empire by starting off with the great city London. Science vs. Religion had... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Evidence:"Within the five mile circle even the great majority of people were inert". That means even the people who were the closest to the Martians they still carried on with their daily life. That actually shows us that 'Social Order' did not change. The word 'inert' is in fact very clever thought off because the word itself means that something does not react to something else and this is shown in the Novel by the populace not responding to the Martians and carrying on with their normal life. H.G. Wells could think about this word because he was a biology teacher and the word 'inert' is a scientific word. Only a few people went to that hole to have a look at it what actually happened. Evidence:"I found a little crowd of perhaps twenty people surrounding the huge hole in which the cylinder lay". That shows us that 'Social Order' does not inert to the event that is happening to their great city. They have a better work to do then going to a cylinder landed from another planet. 'Twenty people' is a very low amount of people because we in this time would expect about 100 or 1000 of people 'surrounding the huge hole in which the cylinder lay', means again that 'Social Order' does not respond to that event at all. The reaction to a modern reader to this particularly event is very dissimilar because we at this time would all run away from the Martians. H.G. Wells did not write this in his Novel because at that time they did not had ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 9. The Satire of H.G Wells Few advancements in human history have made more impact on our modern world than the industrial revolution. Coupled with this leap in industry, imperialism defined the economic political and social structure across the globe. Essentially the industrial revolution defined the means, while imperialism dictated who would have eventual control. H.G Wells explores both imperialism and theindustrial revolution by taking them to extremes, and through his satire reflects the specific flaws of both processes as they changed the world around him. H.G Wells himself was a left wing socialist.Socialism essentially commands an abolition of class structure and a "collective ownership of the means of production" (Wikipedia, Socialism). Wells interest... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... This same question of motivation can be applied to British imperialism, it is clear though that British imperialism was not motivated by necessity, but found its impetus in the accumulation of power and resource. The role of ethics in imperialism is also questioned. The Martians seem to have no ethical or moral concern for the humans. Wells describes the В‘extermination' of the Tasmanians, which was conducted by humans on humans, as ruthless (Wells, 1898, p.5). This act lacks the same ethics and morals missing from the Martian invasion. Imperialism is thus presented as an act that lacks these ethical and moral concerns. The humans initial reaction to the Martian invasion is also of significance because Wells presents the humans as overly self confident, arrogant and to a degree ignorant of the danger that is posed to them. The ignorance and self–confidence of humanity is presented most strikingly in the Londoners reaction to a Sunday Sun article describing В‘massacres' and the ineffectiveness of traditional weapons against the Martians (Wells, 1898, p.20). The notion that the Martians would be unable to move under earth's gravity was also simply accepted by the humans (Wells, 1898, p20). By presenting the reactions to the invasion in this manner, Wells is commenting on a society that has grown complacent and too self assured. When the scale of the invasion is known the society resorts to panic. The arrogance of the society presented by Wells can be compared ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 10. The Hopeless Outlook for Victorian Society in H.G. Wells'... The Hopeless Outlook for Victorian Society in H.G. Wells' The Time Machine In the 'Time Machine', H G Wells writes about what he depicts the future to be like. He explains in great detail his views of evolution and Dystopia. The world he has travelled to could for all he knows be another planet. It is the definition of a Dystopia, with to opposite species living against each other, one calm and peaceful whilst the other is out to destroy the calm species, needing to kill them to live. Wells writes about a future where technology has advanced so much that people become lazy causing technology to go back on itself. In the first two chapters of the novel, Wells depicts the Victorian age as a... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... A time machine is a very detailed piece of work, it is also very technologically advanced. When the Time Traveller arrives in the future, he is initially impressed by the world he finds, he is lost for words as is he is impressed with what he sees around him, "My sensations would be hard to describe," The Time Traveller cannot describe his feelings for what he can see, perhaps this is because it is so different from what he is used to, and Victorians are possibly not used to such a change. They live in a very ordinary world where doing the same and everything being the same all the time is normal. The whole place seems new to him and he is not used to it. His descriptions are odd as he describes it as a "waste of beautiful bushes and flowers," his surroundings are also described as "shadowy and mysterious." These descriptions show it is in a way peaceful, but different. The people he meets seem to have "a certain lack of interest" In the Time Traveller, which could mean they are not alarmed by him as they have never come across anything of any danger during the day time, maybe they feel he is of no harm as he is not attacking during the night. At first sight the Time traveller notices huge impressive buildings built with great detail, but ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 11. Everyone In The World Has Had Something Or Someone Relatively Everyone in the world has had something or someone relatively close to them that has left an everlasting influence. H.G. Wells is no different than the rest of the world. There were many events and people in his adolescent life that inspired him to become a very successful, wealthy writer. More importantly, they inspired him to write his first, most successful novel, The Time Machine. His novel, The Time Machine, was written under the influence of his unique childhood that sparked his interest in literature, his family and social standing that strongly affected the foundation of his work, and from his fascination for science and the ideas of successful scientists. Wells had an interesting upbringing that influenced the highly successful... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Most of the time, a person gets most inspiration from a person close to them, more specifically a loved one. H.G. Wells was no different. The influence from Wells's mother and father, as well as his upbringing, is undoubtedly present throughout The Time Machine. He was born in the Victorian era where the common folks barely made enough money to survive, and the upper class flourished with more money than anyone could ever imagine. The Wells family happened to fall into the struggling middle class. His mother was a housekeeper, and his father was a poor businessman. His influence from the continuous class struggle is evident in his novel, especially through his characters. H.G. Wells's family and social life had a very big impact on his novel The Time Machine. His entire life he struggled with his social class. He portrays much of that struggle into his novel. A reader can sense his struggle when reading The Time Machine because it is clear that Wells mocks the rich, upper class in his work. His feelings towards the future societies are very evident in his main character, the Time Traveler. The Time Traveler was a very smart, intellectual upper class man. In the novel, he predicts two futures for society. Though in the story, the societies are presented as the Time Traveler's predictions, they are in fact H.G.Wells's idea of evolution of the social classes. He predicted that the rich would evolve into wonderful, intricate creatures, while the poor would deteriorate ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 12. The Red Room by H.G. Wells Essay The Red Room by H.G. Wells The title 'The Red Room' immediately attracts the reader's attention; it is symbolic but leaves unanswered questions. ?What is the red room?? Is this room dangerous? Overall the title raises so much curiosity wanting us to read on and find answers to our questions. Red is a very strong colour and is generally associated with blood, danger, warning, hell, and above all, fear, the title also shows the setting of the story. It makes you wonder why the room is called the red room and if it is actually red. The Red Room contains all the elements of a ghost story; the story is written to illustrate the nature of fear and is an insight into how it affects the human mind. This story contains all the... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... ?The great Red Room of Lorraine Castle, in which the young Duke had died.? The stories brought up have an effect on both the reader and the young man in the story. For the reader it reinforces the feeling that the man is doomed and for the young man himself, it shatters his nerves and makes him aware of all the possible dangers that could seal his fate if he enters the room. There is only one main character in ?The Red Room?, and three minor characters. The main character is not introduced to us in any way; all we learn is that he is a 28 year old and is at this castle to prove his manhood by staying overnight in a ?haunted room?. We do not know how he came to be at the house or whom he is trying to prove himself to. He is, at no point in the story given a name. This is done on purpose, to create a mysterious and uneasy atmosphere, but within the first few lines of dialogue we understand that he is a very confident and boastful man: ?It will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me.? However brave he says he is, he carries a gun with him. This shows that he is prepared for a possible emergency, although if there was a ghost, then generally you would be unable to shoot a ghost because the bullet would go straight through the ghost; it reinforces that he doesn?t believe in ghosts. He is rather curious and inquisitive and is always looking for an answer which is just like the ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 13. Essay on The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells The Red Room and The Cone by H.G. Wells Both stories are Gothic mystery stories and were written around the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century. These sorts of stories usually have a setting of a dark, abandoned and scary place. The Red Room is about a young man who visits a castle and feels he must spend a night in a mysterious room that is suspected to be haunted. The Cone is about a woman having an affair with a man called Raut. The story is based around the husband who is called Horrocks seeing Raut with his wife. However it is not known whether or not Horrocks knows if his wife is having an affair with Raut. The opening of all three stories start with dialogue and immediately help to create ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... This is because it gives the reader an idea of the person so they can visualise it for themselves, but at the same time doesn't give the reader enough information which therefore makes the reader feel more involved in the book. For example, in The Cone it reads 'a silent grey, shadowy figure.' This description is vague and so it doesn't give the reader a clear picture of the character, and therefore, this again creates tension because of the lack of description. In the case of 'The Red Room' there is also a description of a man that possesses a 'withered arm.' This is an uncommon feature in any person, even one as old as the one mentioned in the story. The reader would think that there must have been a reason why this old man has this feature and because the reason has not been explained to the reader, he or she will be compelled to read on to find out how the old man achieved this withered arm. Also I believe that the descriptions of major characters and settings would add to the tension and suspense as well. This is because in giving the reader a small but detailed description of the setting, it involves the reader more, therefore the reader feels more involved with the book and so tension is created a lot easier. In The Red Room the sentence 'chilly echoing passage' and 'long draughty subterranean passage' draws the reader into the story and helps them feel as if they were ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 14. Essay On Social Commentary In The Time Machine By H. G. Wells Suffering amongst societies classes: Social commentary in The Time Machine Would one travel into the future if one could? H.G. Wells is the author of the science fiction novel The Time Machine. This novel was published in 1895 and impacted the science fiction genre by changing millions of peoples point of view. This was H.G. Wells first novel and is follows societies classes during the industrial revolution. In The Time Machine, H.G. Wells, creates a social commentary by using tone, symbolism, and imagery to show the suffering and misunderstanding of societies classes. H.G. Wells uses tone to describe his disappointment towards the classes decline. He says, "The upper–world man had drifted towards his feeble prettiness" (Wells 91). When using... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Wells uses symbolism to show the importance of the Morlocks and Elois. The Elois represent the richer class. He made the Elois appear fragile, as do the wealthy. He says, "The upper world class ...the favored aristocracy" (Wells 61). During the industrial revolution the wealthy did not work but stayed wealthy. Another symbol is the Morlocks, he says "Morlocks their mechanical servants" (Wells 67). The lower class is represented by Morlocks. The factory workers were merely peasants. Their unattractiveness showed their poorness. The poor worked for the rich, making their luxuries. H.G. Wells uses imagery to show the difference in class amongst the Morlocks and Elois. He describes, "a queer ape–like figure, its head held down in a peculiar manner..." (Wells 53). The Morlocks are very unappealing because of their horrid visual appearance. They do not look remotely similar to the human man. The Morlocks are the lower class habitats and this shows they did not have the luxury of looking good. Wells uses terms such as "human rats" and "human spiders". Since the Morlocks consume the Elois, Wells thinks of them more as animals instead of humans. On the contrary, the Elois are the opposite. Wells says, "The mouths were small, with bright red, rather thin lips, the eyes were large and mild." (Wells 27). The Elois look much more appealing and human like. Wells describe them wearing robes and sandals. Not only do they look different they also remind the time traveler of children. The Eloi ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 15. Essay about The Time Machine by H.G. Wells The Time Machine by H.G. Wells Works Cited Not Included Time traveling, a concept known to modern man as inconceivable, but in The Time Machine, by H.G. Wells, this fathom of human fantasy has come to life. Wells entangles a unique blend of contrasting characters, conflicts of capitalist verses laborer divisions, and foreshadowing of the destruction of humanity to seem together this novel of visionary proportions. "The Time Machine is a bleak and sober vision of man's place in the Universe."(McConnell Pg.1581) Well's use of characters in The Time Machine brings a heavy sense of contrast and diversity into the story. There are five main characters around which the story revolves. Beginning with the Eloi and the Morlocks, which are ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The Morlocks, on the other hand from the Eloi, are the laborer and harsher branch of humanity. The Morlocks are hairy and monstrous creatures with red glowing eyes and razor sharp teeth. "He is supprised to learn of another people, the Morlocks, ugly, fearsome, and subterranean."(Molson Pg.600) The Morlocks live under ground in a subterranean environment running machines and underground factories. Due to their adaptations to their underground living environment, the Morlocks only come to the upper world in the dark, for they cannot stand the glare of sunlight. "They are strange little beings whose pallid bodies are just the half–bleached color of the worms and things one sees preserved in spirit in a zoological museum. They are chinless, and in their faces are set great lidless, pinkish grey eyes that glow of red. At night they leave their subterranean world to hunt down Eloi for food."(McConnell Pg.3865) The next character is the Time Traveler himself, who remains nameless throughout the whole novel. He is an inventor with an infatuation of the future and Darwin's theory of the fourth dimension. The Time Traveler is middle class citizen, just as Wells was in his day. The traveler is highly concerned with the world to come and has spent years perfecting his spectacular machine. " 'It took two years to make,' retorted the Time Traveler."(Wells Pg.14) The next ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 16. The Effects Of Hydraulic Fracturing On The Environment Hydraulic Fracturing is a process which uses water to crack rock formations as a means to extract natural gas or oil. This method is highly debatable as to whether it uses too much water in areas that have fragile water sources as well as whether the process contaminates surrounding water sources. The State of Texas is a hotspot for hydraulic fracturing because of the amount of shale formations which can produce oil and natural gas. Texas is a dry state which often experiences severe droughts. There is debate about if Texas has sufficient water supplies to support hydraulic fracturing. Since hydraulic fracturing is a fairly new process, there needs to be more research to determine the realistic affect it has on the environment. The... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Does fracking pollute the water of surrounding water systems to unsafe levels for human consumption? These areas will be explored throughout this document. 1 What is Hydraulic Fracturing The United States Geological Survey Energy Resources Program defines hydraulic fracturing as "an oil and gas well development process that typically involves injecting water, sand, and chemicals under high pressure into a bedrock formation via the well" (Hydraulic Fracturing). The process is meant to produce fractures in the rock formations which increases the flow of oil from the bedrock to the wells, where it can then be processed into crude oil (Hydraulic Fracturing). Despite being a fairly new method of extraction, fracking has quickly become one of the top methods in use. 2 Water Conditions in Texas. In June of 2014, 70 percent of Texas was in drought; of that 70 percent, 21 percent was classified as being in a state of extreme or exceptional drought (Everything You Need...). In 2013, the state climatologist said part of the cause of the drought was the climbing temperatures due to climate change (Everything You Need...). The climatologist stated that the average temperature in the State of Texas has increased an average of 2 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1970s (Everything You Need...). Texas has experienced several severe droughts throughout history including the droughts of the 1950s, 1984, and 1996 ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 17. The War of the Worlds, by H.G. Wells Although it was published seventeen years after my death, the novel War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells is a work of fiction that I would take great pleasure in reading. It would not be because of the futuristic tales of creatures from Mars that would make it so enjoyable, but instead the major themes that present themselves in the novel. It would be quite easy to discover that many of my ideas manifested themselves in Wells' work. He drew many of his inspirations and ideas from our mutual friend, and his mentor, Thomas Henry Huxley. War of the Worlds helped perpetuate my work in a literary and fictional fashion, something that I greatly appreciate. I am Charles Darwin and although my passion is natural science, I have a feeling that this ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... For instance, the Martians have heat ray guns, something that the humans have not fathomed yet. The Martians use these guns to their fullest power, and destroy everything around them with a simple zap. In my theory, it is always the more evolved species that comes out victorious. It would appear, with their seemingly superior intelligence, that the Martians would be the obvious victors. They seemed to have everything planned out for their journey to Earth, even the fact that gravity would have a significant effect on them so they developed the tripod machines. In the novel itself, the Martians are referred as the higher intellectual beings. In chapter eleven, the narrator "began to compare the things to human machines, to ask [himself] for the first time in [his] life how an ironclad or a steam engine would seem to an intelligent lower animal," inferring that the humans are the lower intelligent animals. So, the Martians win because they have been around longer and they are much smarter, right? Wrong! This is where Wells truly proves his ability as a writer and storyteller. The somewhat obvious choice to win is thrown through a loop, thus losing the fight. The Martians end up dying off because they have been exposed to "micro–organisms," something they have never encountered before because they "have never appeared on Mars or Martian sanitary science ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 18. The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Signalman by Charles... The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Signalman by Charles Dickens `'The Red Room' by H.G Wells and 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens are two short stories set in the later 19th century ('The Red Room' 1896, 'The Signalman' 1860s). 'The Red Room' is a Gothic horror story while 'The Signalman' is a story containing many elements of Gothic horror from the earlier 19th century. They both mention the supernatural although 'The Signalman' is questioning it and 'The Red Room' is a story made to prove that there is no such thing as the supernatural. H. G Wells created fear and suspense in 'The Red Room' in many ways. He raises the suspense level mainly through the personalities of the three old custodians, with language, description... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Another phrase that raises questions in the reader's mind and excites them is when the old woman says 'This night of all nights!'. This makes the reader think what is so unique about tonight. And the descriptions of the three old people appearances and their actions increases the level of fear, suspense and disgust. One of which was, 'the old people were trying to enhance the spiritual terrors'. This phrase comes back to whether there are ghosts haunting the house or not. One of the most important descriptions in this story was the word 'atavistic' which is a word meaning ancient and as if from another supernatural place, showed that the narrator thought that they might be beings of the supernatural, which also shows he is losing reason. Another part of the story that helped in many ways to make readers at the edge of their seats and frightened was when the narrator was in the Red Room. When the candles start going out increases the fear and suspense level tremendously. The two phrases from that part of the story that helped was when he said 'as if the wicks had been suddenly nipped between a finger and thumb' and 'an invisible hand seemed to sweep out the two candles' makes the reader think ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 19. War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Essay example War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Homo–Superior? War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells is a fiction story written about war and mankind's coming of age. It is also a philosophical novel with many deep meanings underlying the shallow looking one–hundred–eighty–eight page book. The subject of this novel is Science Fiction and there are not many that can even compete with Wells in terms of how superior his word descriptions are. He simply does wonders with the imagination of the reader. Obviously the whole book is about the struggle mankind faces, but it is not always with aliens, they are actually more of a good way to represent what Wells really believed. He believed man is dominant, yet should remember how big the universe is ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... In this case the setting is perfect on account of the humans having a small sense of hope in their machinery, but not enough technology to really compete. Characters are not a big part of this book. The main one, who never reveals his name, is the only one who in fact does not always go with the craziness of the public. He does have his moments of running away screaming and hiding, but he learns more about himself, mankind, and the aliens than anyone else in the book. He has loved ones in England and hates the aliens for what they do to his home, yet he understands what the aliens are trying to do. First person is a good way to write this kind of book because the reader knows exactly what a regular Joe would be thinking at a time like this. Another reason Wells is such a great author. Other characters are the aliens, who seem to be ugly heads that talk with their minds. The physical characteristics they possess are far different from humans and they never communicate with the humans. The last character worthy of note is the artillery man the main character meets towards the end of the book. The two seem to agree on the way things will work out, and both would rather live than die fighting. They play many games together, eat and talk and even spend the night out in the English countryside together.
  • 20. Without this man, the book does not exist and there is no story. ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 21. Themes in The Invisible Man by H.G Wells The Invisible Man has many possible themes. There are multiple examples of different themes in the novel. Most of them can almost fall under the same idea. The main theme for the novel is how excessive greed can have unintended consequences. The main character, Griffin, goes mad with the power of being invisible. It gets to the point that he is not even trying to just stay hidden anymore, he is just trying to cause as much mayhem in the country as possible. One of the first instances of greed is when he starts to take advantage of Mrs. Hall, the woman who owns the Coach & Horses Inn. Mrs. Hall mainly feels bad for him at first because she thinks he is very hurt or injured in some sort of way due to him wrapping his head up. Griffin keeps... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Soon all over the town burglaries start to occur. In the middle of the night the people who are being robbed can hear someone in their house, but when they search around there is no one to be found. So since the incident with Mr. Cuss and all these burglaries, the townspeople start to point fingers are Griffin. The Hall's even send a person after Griffin to perform an exorcism thinking he is a witch or something that has to do with magic. After a while Griffin does not pay his bill at the inn for a few days, Mrs. Hall wants an explanation for it. He even tries to give her more money but she refuses it. Now earlier in the novel him paying for his rent with the money he stole was only real use for the money. Now that he cannot even give Mrs. Hall any more money, he has no use for the money he has stolen whatsoever. After she asks for an explanation, he removes all of his clothes to show how he invisible. Tons of people come to inn to see what is going on, soon a man comes to take him in for questioning about all of the burglaries that have been going on all around the town. Griffin becoming exposed to the entire town now has caused him to flee to the country or farm area. Once again he has been punished in a way for the things he has done. He definitely could have gone around having to leave the town. He got way to greedy and careless about his actions. The only way he is trying to fix his problems are by violence or just idiotic ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 22. Hg Wells Research Paper H.G. Wells H.G. Wells, the Father of science fiction, was a liberal thinker who set the literary world ablaze with his sheer creativity. He gave form to many of the ideas of the future, and a chaotic family life shaped him. H.G. Wells was a man of many influences, who impacted the people of his time, and left a legacy that remains today. He grew up to be the enigmatic man he was because of his family. H.G. Wells grew up in the lower middle class under constant threat of poverty (brittania.com,). His father owned a hardware store, but more money came in from his cricket playing. Incidentally, his mother appeared to do all work in his family. He had two older brothers. Marriage came with its own influences He married his cousin Isabel Mary Wells with whom ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Surprisingly, his first published book was a Textbook of Biology. His first novel,The Time Machine, was met with immediate success. The Wonderful Visit, The Island of Doctor Moreau, and The War of the Worlds quickly followed it. Wells also wrote numerous essays and articles at the time. Unfortunately, he did not stick with science fiction, instead choosing to write comic novels of the lower middle class. Not only did he write about the future; he also made several correct predictions. H.G. Wells is sometimes known as the father of futurism (biography.com). He managed to predict World War II (biography.com). He also predicted the tank, military aircraft, and the atomic bomb (biography.com). The modern idea of a Martian comes from The War of the Worlds. H.G. Wells was a man who pushed the limits of imagination. From a poorly educated boy to one of the greatest authors of all time truly is a truly astounding change. Influenced by his surroundings, he created worlds unto himself. He truly shaped the ideas the future and left those who knew him in awe. ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 23. The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G.... The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H.G. Wells 'To be denied of information as a reader is far more powerful than to know the truth.' In this assignment I will be looking at the two short stories written in the 1800's: "The Red Room" by H.G.Wells where a man goes into an apparently haunted room and although he is warned by other old characters he does not listen and the tension builds up as he goes into the room where fear gets the better of him in a room which might not be haunted in the end. The other short story is "The Signalman" by Charles Dickens. In The signalman a man lives separated from the real world living a lonely life as a signal man at a train station and thinks he might be being visited by ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The structures of the two stories are structured to create and sustain suspense. Both Dickens and Wells try to build up suspense in the beginning of the stories and to add to the tension the stories end with mystery and lead you to your own interpretation of what could have happened. The Signalman opens with the quote 'Halloa! Below there' this short, but effective line becomes very decisive as the story goes on. We don't know whose speaking and so creates tension already. The man he is shouting at below looks round to face the tunnel 'Looked down the line'. Any normal person would look upwards in response to this. Dickens is creating the unexplainable which builds up the tension and suspense. It is the Described that The Signalman thinks the narrator is a ghost and visa versa, 'The monstrous thought came into my mind as I perused the fixed eyes and the saturnine face, that this was a spirit, not a man'. This immediately hints the involvement of the supernatural which can build suspense and mystery to the story. Commenting on the atmosphere around him the narrator tells that 'it struck chill to me, as if I had left the natural world.' The end of The Signalman is full of mystery after the suspense is built through out. When the narrator went in the morning to the signalman's box and finds him dead, under the 'danger light' peacefully it is very strange and mysterious because he knew his job very well and was very safe 'I should ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 24. The Effects of Social Isolation in the Invisible Man by... Social Isolation, a state or process in which persons, groups, or cultures lose or do not have communication or cooperation with one another, often resulting in open conflict. In H.G Wells' 1897 novel The Invisible Man, the main character, Griffin, is socially isolated due to a condition that has forced him to stay out of the scrutinizing eye of society .As the novel progresses, the effects of social isolation begin to take form in Griffin's actions and become more pertinent with each event that occurs. These actions show the effects of social isolation throughout the course of the novel. The beginning of Griffin's social isolation begins early in his life. Griffin is albino, meaning that he has little to no pigmentation in his skin, eyes, and hair. This condition makes it exceptionally challenging for Griffin to be a cohesive member of society, so in order to avoid the eminent rejection that he believes awaits him if he tries to join society, he chooses to become an introvert. "The expression a "fish out of water" reminds us that every animal is adapted to a habitat" (Pinker 374). Griffin does not have a habitat to adapt to because he lives outside of society and has no one to help him adapt. At this point Griffin is able to be diagnosed with a form of social loneliness due to his feelings of being an outcast (Gelinas 4). After Griffin is isolated from society for a short period of time, his anger starts to progress into something that even he cannot control. As the novel ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 25. Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by... Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce The Victorian era, spanning from 1830–1901, was a period of dramatic change with the rapid extension of colonialism through Africa, Asia and the West Indies making England a world power and relocating the perceived centre of western civilisation to London. Advances in industry, science, technology, architecture, medicine and travel were among these changes as well as the growing interest, among the masses, in the occult, supernatural and life. H.G Wells' book "The Red Room" is the first I will examine. The story begins when a young scientist sets out to prove that the "Red Room" in a castle is ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Both "vastness" and "ocean" make the reader feel lost and fearful of the unknown activities and size of the room. Other words like "mystery" and "suggestion" add to create the effect of fear and suspense. Many other words such as "omens", "spiritual", "ghosts", "witches", "shadows", "echoes", "haunted", "spectral" and "subterranean" are piled on the reader to create a sense of fear, vulnerability and death. Next is "The Signalman" by Charles Dickens, which is about a visit from a ghost. The setting for this story is very old, depressing, dingy and gloomy but the scenery around the signalman isn't reflected in his personality. His "box" is located underground next to the railway line. Straight away the setting seems to be weird as it's descending down, as if almost entering hell, "zigzag path descending down". I think this because most nice stairways are straight and go up, not uneven. The writer also describes the place as a "great dungeon"; this says to me that it's a place of death and torture because those are the words I would think of when "dungeon" is mentioned. Also it says there was a "gloomy red light, and the gloomier entrance to a black, in whose massive architecture there was a barbourus, depressing and forbidding air". This makes the reader think that this ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 26. Comparing The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Darkness Out... Comparing The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Darkness Out There by Penelope Lively The "Red Room" was the earlier of the two stories written in 1896 by H.G. Wells and "The Darkness Out There", written by Penelope Lively was published in1984. The titles of both stories suggest that fear or horror will play a part. "The Darkness Out There" generates an eerie feeling by not defining a specific threat but leaving it open to the imagination. "The Red Room" is not as scary but the use of red often shows danger or fear and this is why it has been used here. H.G. Wells does not give his main character a name as it is written in the first person. Penelope Lively gives the girl, Sandra, a name but it ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... In "The Darkness Out There" you are immediately introduced to Sandra. "She walked through flowers, the girl, ox–eye daisies and vetch and cow parsley" this is a very beautiful setting and everything is perfect. We are also introduced briefly to characters who we later meet again, Mrs Rutter ("She's a dear old thing") and Pat who, although she is not described as very nice looking, runs a "Good neighbours' club" for children. As the story opens Sandra is on her way to help Mrs Rutter with one of the others from the club although she does not know who that will be. We are suddenly told about "Packers End and immediately it is clear that it is not a nice place, it was where a German plane had come down during the war and it was said that people still heard the pilots talking. "You didn't go by yourself through Packers End if you could help it, not after teatime, anyway." Packers End is described as a "rank place, all whippy saplings and brambles and a gully with a dumped mattress and a bedstead and an old fridge. And somewhere, presumably, the crumbling rusty scraps of metal and cloth and … bones?" "The Red Room" however begins in an old dark castle and you are immediately plunged into the story with descriptions and introductions happening along the way. The story does not start in The Red Room but in a communal room with a table. This
  • 27. ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 28. The Effect Of Sonic Logs On The Petroleum Industry And The... Logging is a method which has been used over a period of time to better understand subsurface parameters and reservoir conditions. The Acoustic or Sonic log is one such method which is used in combination with density and neutron logs in order to determine these parameters. Full–waveform acoustic logging has advanced significantly in both theory and application in recent years, and these advances have greatly increased the capability of log analysts to measure the physical properties of formations (Paillet et al 1992). This report focuses on the basic application of sonic logs in the petroleum industry and the current advances made in their application. It is also explained how porosity of the rocks are obtained from shaly formations using sonic logs. The principle of sonic logging involves a transmitter and a receiver wherein a signal is sent from the transmitter and the amount of time taken until it has reached the receiver is recorded. The speed of sound in the subsurface depends on the elastic properties of the rock matrix, the porosity of the formations, fluid content and pressure of the formation (Petroleum Transactions, Members AIME 1958). Sonic logging is carried out after the well has been drilled. Background: History of Sonic Logs Sonic logs were first introduced in the 1920s as a part of surface seismic techniques in in oil and gas exploration. In the beginning there was an obvious interpretation problem between the time and depth correlation. Although the ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 29. Time Machine by H.G. Wells Essay examples Time Machine by H.G. Wells Works Cited Missing In 1895, Victorian Britain was very much Great Britain– 'the workshop of the world.' Since the Industrial Revolution technological advancement had changed the face of the country (shape, structure and appearance). Heavy industry demanded fossil fuels and therefore there was a heavy demand for mine workers. Growing transport demands led to new roads being built. Life in 802,701 seemed very different to that of 1895, it was a time of easy going and a very laid back time. Everything about this time was different ' ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The Eloi live off a life of pleasure and are the over–landers, they are very small and fragile with a very weak character 'Their hair, which was uniformly curly came to a sharp end at the neck and cheek; there ears were singularly minute. The mouths were small, with bright red, rather thin lips, and the little chins ran to a point. The eyes were large and mild,' that was a quote from the book in which Wells describes the Eloi in a very detailed fashion. The Morlocks were the masters of the land and these used to be the exploited labourers, they were the mine and factory workers who worked in appalling dark conditions. The Morlocks feed off of the Eloi which is a class of cannibalism, they have total control over the Eloi which is totally the opposite to when Wells wrote this book, the Morlocks, the workers, had no say in what went on all they were there to do was to work hard in appalling conditions. The Morlocks are ugly looking creatures and work underground in dark surroundings, they are subterranean beings and they have totally adapted to this environment, in the book Wells describes them as 'small, white moving creatures with large bright eyes' he says it looked like a 'human spider.' The Morlcoks eat the Eloi as that is there only source of food ' Clearly, at some time in the Long Ago of human decay the Morlocks food had run short. Possibly they had ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 30. Essay about War Of The Worlds by H.G. Wells War Of The Worlds by H.G. Wells As the Martians fire their deadly heat rays, destroying towns and cities will anyone survive against the overwhelming odds? What were the Martians doing here? This could not have been a friendly visit, so what were their intentions? In H.G. Wells War of the Worlds the humans' instinct to survive overcomes threats to their existence. When faced with the unknown the human instinct for survival gives us only two options, fight or flight. When the unknown plumes of fire were first spotted shooting from Mars it attracted many scientists, and it was also the same year that Mars was close enough to Earth to allow scientists to observe it with telescopes from that era. It was not until the... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... They too wanted to survive. The army had decided that when a cylinder falls it must be destroyed. "New plans were formed to destroy the object before it opened" (24) but the right munitions were needed to accomplish the task. The warship "The Thunder Child" was sent in to help in the fight because it had large guns and that were capable of destroying large objects. "The Thunder Child" waited in the harbour for the Martian fighting machine to come close enough and instead of firing would ram it. The reason for knocking the Martian fighting machine over is because the Navy had already known that guns and heavy weaponry could not destroy the Martians fighting machine. The water had destroyed the first Martian fighting machine and they would try to accomplish the same task. The many soldiers that managed to escape had to find a place to hide and one "pushed on, wet and shivering to the nearest house." (29) Other soldiers that did not want to take the risk of flight "hid under dead horses for a long time, peeping out furtively across the common" (33) in hopes that the Martians would leave. People returning to their homes found soldiers retreating, hiding or dead. The soldiers cared about other people because those returning home were told to leave because "you may be hurt if you cross the canal." (22) Soldiers ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 31. Destruction of a Great City in The War of the Worlds by... In 1898, H G Wells wrote "The War of the Worlds," a novel that envisioned the destruction of a great city and the slaughter of its inhabitants. The invaders were Martians, but aliens were not needed to make this devastation a reality. In a few years after the publication of the book, human beings would play the part of inhuman pillaging with the realization of war and its effect toward society. There has never been a war where no one was killed. From the beginning, man has always been engaged in hostilities. Suffering and losses become a daily part of life in the front lines. Soldiers are reduced to expendable objects and losing dignity is present in every soul. There are no substitutes to the pains that war creates. How does one ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... They feel that the world is becoming a dangerous place day by day. Their reactions are sudden and quick. Anxiousness marks their days. The sudden flash of light, the roll of thunder, and an abrupt sound is a messenger of death to them. They are prone to lose connection with the present when faced with situations that provoke their responses to danger. When silence engulfs them, visions of horror hark back. Civilians have also played a major role in these conflicts. The constant threat of murder lies in the deep recesses of one's thoughts. Ruin, torture, and slaughter dominates the minds of ethnic minorities. Minorities become the target by the impoverished majority. No one will be so confident to believe that every war is just and necessary. There is a common notion that under modern conditions peace cannot be guaranteed except on the basis of an equal scale of armaments and this may be the cause of stockpiling arms. Justice, common sense, and the recognition of man's cry for dignity call for a cessation of arms and the decrease of violence. Furthermore, the eradication of nuclear heads, elimination of land mines, and the decrease of small arms such as semi–automatic rifles and hand grenades will greatly reduce the constant threat of brutality. A nation full of missiles will less likely offer a place of security for its citizens and every gunshot is an act of larceny to those whose cries are ignored. Thus, the ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 32. H.G. Wells' Novel The War of The Worlds Essay H.G. Wells' Novel The War Of The Worlds Successfully Creates A Thrilling Climate Of Terror Which Often Reflects Late Victorian Insecurities. Discuss This Statement With Reference To The Purpose And Craft Of The Author– 1994 Words H.G. Wells' novel "The War Of The Worlds" depends upon late Victorian insecurities to generate a thrilling climate of terror. Wells feeds off of the politics at that point in time, the ethics and beliefs of his contemporaries and also the sense of false pride and arrogance that white Victorians had considering that they were top of the natural selection hierarchy. He produces this climate of terror not only through the content of his writing, but by his use of language, structure and imagery.... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... Many Britons feared this idea of a technologically advanced war at the time, as Britain was in a naval race with Germany. Germany was challenging Britain's navy because Britain's navy was the best in the world, and one of the main causes of Britain having such a vast empire. Britain were aware of the envy that Germany had, and were therefore fearing the fact that Germany may be secretly planning a war, much like the Martians silently planned an attack on Earth. Wells' also wrote about Victorians losing their faith in religion and the church. Some Victorians believed that god was punishing them as a world war was looming and some even doubted his existence, as there was no proof for it. To illustrate this, Wells created the curate as a highly religious character who had faith in god and also questioned why god had brought this war upon them. The following quote illustrates this, when the curate said "The end! The great and terrible day of the Lord! When men shall call upon the mountains and the rocks to fall upon them and hide them––hide them from the face of Him that sitteth upon the throne!". This may have been an attempt by Wells to voice his opinion, saying that ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 33. H.G. Wells: †The Red Room’ and †The Cone’ Essay H.G. Wells: 'The Red Room' and 'The Cone' The short stories 'The Red Room' and 'The Cone' by HG Wells both heavily feature tension and suspense. The author of the two stories, HG Wells, uses a number of techniques to create this mood and atmosphere to keep his readers interested. HG Wells immediately creates an air of mystery from the outset of 'The Red Room' when he introduces the 'man with the withered arm'. This grotesque description of the man's features, combined with his ambiguity due to having no name given to him, helps create this air of mystery and suspense. The term 'tangible ghost' helps create suspense too, as you normally associate the term 'ghost' with the supernatural, which ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... This imagery draws the reader in as you visualise this sudden, paranormal 'illumination', lighting the room, creating a mysterious atmosphere and a tense anticipation in the reader due to this description of the setting. HG Wells, however, uses a different technique to create a suspenseful mood in 'The Cone' by using his descriptions of the setting to foreshadow the climax of the story. He describes the 'big ironworks' as a 'turmoil of flames and seething molten iron', foreshadowing to the murder of Raut when he is in 'turmoil' himself and falls into the furnace and is engulfed in a 'swift breath of flame'. The constant reference to 'fire' and 'flame' sets a nervous expectation within the reader that the fire of the furnace is going to have some sort of play in the outcome of the story. Another way in which Wells generates a suspenseful mood and atmosphere is through his use of dialogue. When HG Wells has the narrator of 'The Red Room' say 'There is neither ghost of Earl nor ghost of Countess in that room, there is no ghost there at all; but worse, far worse –'. This creates a tense feeling within the reader because you wonder what could this thing worse than a ghost be. This example of Wells' use of dialogue adds to the air of mystery of 'The Red Room', as the way in which the narrator conveys his point is very mysterious to a Twenty–First Century ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 34. Essay on H.G. Wells: The Odd man Who Shaped a Genre H.G. Wells: The Odd Man Who Shaped a Genre Herbert George (H.G.) Wells was a man of many passions both strange and ordinary, but despite his eccentricities, he impacted science fiction and fantasy in a profound and noticeable way. As a man who bridged the entertainment gap between the upper and lower classes that existed at the time, H.G. Wells books felt right at home from the 1890's clear through the Lost Generation (British Writers, Vol. 6, 226). Fantastical plots and relatable language aside, he was also what one might consider a normal man. Despite his being repulsed by monogamy, he wasn't afraid to speak his mind and indulge in worldly pleasures (British Writers, Vol. 6, 227). Born Herbert George Wells on Saturday, 21 September... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... While there, he began one of his many odd relationships with his cousin Isabel, marrying her in 1891 and divorcing her just after his departure from the college in 1894. A year later he published his worksThe Time Machine, The Wonderful Visit, and The Stolen Bacillus, earning him a grand total of ВЈ792 that year (British Writers, Vol. 6, 226). Between the years of 1901 –1914, while continuing to gain popularity in his writing, and continuing to study various scientific theatres, Wells had four children: George Phillip Wells (who went on to co –author several books, including the extension to H.G. Wells autobiography H.G. Wells In Love), Frank Wells, Anna –Jane Blanco–White, and Anthony West (Murray, 12). In the years that followed, going through the first (in which Wells was already too old to fight) and second world wars, Wells became disillusioned to war, and instead of themeing his works after wars and political events like many of the writers at the time tended to do, instead focused on educating mankind ("penguinclassics.co.uk"). This is evidenced by his earlier publishing of the Textbook of Biology, and his continual interview of public figures such as Theodore Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, Vladamir Lenin, and Maxim Gorki, showing his interest in getting as much information as possible to the people of the world, be it scientific or otherwise (Murray, 11–13). He even wrote essays and nonfiction books such as, Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 35. Fracking Is Not The Cleanest Alternative For Oil... Fracking The term, "fracking" has existed for nearly a half century and has always had the negative connotations of being unclean and the source for many environmental issues and adverse health effects. The massive oil deposits recovered by modern hydraulic fracturing can be considered as the oil boom of the twenty–first century and with new methods, safety procedures, and technology, potential hazards can be reduced or even eliminated. Due to the many possible hazards of the fracking process, it has initiated much political discussion at the state and federal levels of government, while inciting concern of local citizens. Fracking is not the cleanest alternative to oil reclamation, but has improved drastically with the introduction of... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... However, fracking fluid is not the only questionable aspect of fracking, included is land and infrastructure degradation, physiological harm to local citizens, utilization of legislation loopholes, and the secrecy of fracking fluid formulas within the industry. Nonetheless, the negative attributes of fracking, such as fracking fluid dispersal and other environmental issues are outweighed by the vast economic gains and can be mitigated by a system of regulations and development of new technologies for the industry. The fracking industry will only increase in size, so much so that reclamation of shale gas is called "eminent shale gas revolution. British Petroleum [BP], for instance, expects global shale gas production to grow six–fold from 2011 to 2030. Shale gas production in the United States already accounts for roughly 30 percent of the nationwide total a growth rate up from only 4 percent in 2005" (Sovacool, 251). It has also been estimated that more than "80 percent of the natural gas wells developed in the United States over the next ten years are expected to require fracking and it is projected that by 2035 natural gas wells will represent more than a 75 percent share of the domestic supply" (Bleiwas, 68). Natural gas exploration began in the late 1940s' to extract the natural gas located in underground reserves. The process consisted of digging a vertical well into the ground to release gas trapped in relatively ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 36. The Relationship Between Eloi and the Morlocks in The... The Relationship Between Eloi and the Morlocks in The Time Machine by H.G. Wells The Time Machine was inventively written as a social critique of the Victorian Era in 1895 by Herbert George Wells, the father of modern science fiction. Wells used the novel to get the messages across on social and political problems at the time when London was on top of the world. The novel criticized mainly on communism, imperialism, capitalism, as well as Social Darwinism. The Time Machine was an adventurous science fiction novel about a Time Traveler, the inventor of a time machine who traveled to the year 802,701 A.D. In the course of his journey, he saw the degeneration and the separation of mankind through ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The sight of the Elois reminded the Time Traveler of communism, which was one of the themes in the novel, since they were all alike. Not only did they have delicate features of human but they were also portrayed as being childlike. "Then in a flash, I perceived that all had the same form of costume, the same soft hairless visage, and the same girlish rotundity of limb," (Wells, 31). Regardless of their physical similarities, the Time Traveler could not distinguish the age and the gender of the Elois since they all looked the same. He believed that this was a result of the world without troubles or fear, in which he criticized. The theme of degeneration was apparent in this novel especially with the Elois. Not only were they weak and childlike, but they also did not work or study. All they did was to play, sleep, eat, bath, and laugh all day long. The Elois were stupid and lazy. They also could not concentrate for a long period of time and they did not have much interest as seen when the Time Traveler was trying to tell them where he was from or to teach them his language. "You see I had always anticipated that the people of the year Eight Hundred and Two Thousand odd would be incredibly in front of us in knowledge, art, everything. Then one of them suddenly asked me a question that showed him to be on the ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 37. Analysis Of The Book ' Animals By Simon Rich Synthesis Essay Animals by Simon Rich is an outstanding short story which takes a unique perspective on the everyday life in a classroom. The story is written from the point of view of a hamster who spends his tortured life entrapped in a cage. From the first point in this story it is clear that the purpose of the writing is not to understand the hamster, but rather to analyse the different actions of the people, and to discover that how they act towards the hamsters reflects on their character. It is curious to view the everyday interactions of people through a different set of eyes, that is done by humanizing the narrator's perspective. Based on the actions of the many people and the treatment of the class pet, the author suggests that human nature is very much a product of the financial circumstances a person is subjected to. There are a couple of key characters in this story, the first of which is Simon. He is just one of many strikingly similar students in homeroom 2k. Simon, like many of the students is irresponsible, and unsympathetic towards the hamsters. Simon jeopardizes the lives of the hamsters by attempting to joke around instead of completing his assigned task, which involves giving them food and water. The majority of the story takes place in a private school, and the reader can make the assumption that the student's parents are wealthy. The author portrays simon as well as the other kids in a bad light, that they are, by default, poorly behaved and somewhat ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 38. The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Essay examples H.G. Wells, author of mind blowing novel The War of The Worlds, used foreshadowing and both external and internal conflicts to show the theme those humans should not assume that they are the superior race. Wells was the author of more than 100 books, almost half of them nonfiction, published over a span of 52 years. In Bromley, Herbert George Wells was born. Wells started Morley's school in Bromley when he was seven, when he was 14 he became apprenticed to a draper. In 1883, Wells rebelled against their fate. Herbert arrived at up park when he was 14. Some events that propelled Wells in a new direction are in his autobiography called "starts in life". When Herbert George Wells was young his mother taught him how to read, Mostly using big... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... In 1890 Wells got his degree from the University of London. After Wells married his cousin Isabel, he started teaching in London at a correspondence college, as radical causes increased his criticism because more explicit. Wells had a public life; he expressed those opinions through syndicated articles. In July 1889, Wells got second degree honors in zoology after his science examination. In September 1884, Wells attended the normal school of science at the age of 18. H.G. Wells moved to London when he was 22. Wells studied elementary biology and under Professor Huxley. Wells was in his prime at the beginning of the new century. Wells became a science teacher until 1893. Tuberculosis led Wells to become a full–time writer. During most of World War 2 Wells was home in London. Wells met Vladimir Lenin in Russia after the war. Wells told the world of his experiences and impressions. Wells told of the Soviet experiment. H.G. Well's father was a talented professional cricket player. H.G. Wells took 5 pounds and moved to London in 1888. Wells traveled back and forth from France during the Wars. (Abrams 13+; Hall 310+; "Herbert George Wells–Biography"; Kunitz 1492; O'neal 1630; "Wells, H. G." 122). The idea of the future of humanity greatly fascinated Wells. People refer to Wells as the father of modern science fiction. One of Wells best known novels "The Time Machine" was his first ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 39. Differences between H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds"... ENG 3c Culminating Assignment The War of the Worlds: Book and movie adaptation comparison By Magaidh Gordon Part A: Summary Text: The War of the Worlds (1898), a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, is the first –person narrative of an unnamed protagonist's (and his brother's) adventures in Surrey and London as Earth is invaded by aliens. Written in 1895, it is one of the earliest stories that details a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race. Despite its age, this book is still a widely–enjoyed classic, and has inspired nearly 50 movies, 6 Broadway productions, and 2 musicals (one of which I personally own) in its time! The War of the Worldspresents itself as a factual account of the Martian ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The narrator escapes detection by hiding in the coal–cellar. The Martians eventually depart, and the narrator is able to head toward Central London. He once again encounters the artilleryman, who briefly persuades him to cooperate in a grandiose plan to rebuild civilization underground. But after a few hours the narrator perceives the lunacy of this plan and the overall laziness of his companion and abandons the artilleryman to his delusions. Heading into a deserted London, he is at the point of despair and offers his life to the aliens when he discovers that the invaders have died from microbial infections to which they had no immunity, since "there are no bacteria in Mars." The narrator realises with joy that the threat has been vanquished. The narrator suffers a brief breakdown of which he remembers nothing, he is nursed back to health by a kind family, and returns home to find his wife, whom he had given up for dead. The last chapter, entitled "Epilogue," reflects on the significance of the invasion and the "abiding sense of doubt and insecurity" that it has left in the narrator's mind. Movie: Although many movies have been inspired by H.G. Wells' The War of
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  • 41. H.G. Wells' The Time Traveler Essay H.G. Wells' The Time Traveler H.G. Wells lived at the turn of the century. During this time, there was a huge gulf between the rich and poor. "The Time Traveller's" socialist tone highlights the injustices of the British class system. Well's protagonist, imagines the future to consist of a perfect society, where everyone is equal and technology is extremely advanced. This view is based on mankind's continual advances during his lifetime, so he assumes we will continue to advance in the future. "The Time Traveller" reflects H.G Well's opinions about mankind, and acts as a warning for what could happen in the future if society does not embrace equality and humanity. When the Time Traveller arrives in the future, he notices ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... He fails to acknowledge the obvious dilapidation and decay in the city. The Time Traveller first notices the Morlocks, in the night. There were several of them carrying something up the hill. He thinks they are ghosts, which is a common rationalisation for phenomenon, which is frightening or alien to us. This is true in the Eloi's case. They are scared of the dark, as they do not know what is out there. The Eloi sleep together because they are scared of the dark because as this is when the Morlocks come out to prey. The Time Traveller then develops a second theory that the Morlocks were the working class of his age and the Eloi the upper class. This is a complete contrast to his communist theory, it is infact, a form of capitalism. He imagines that the Morlocks came to live underground because the upper class, the Eloi did not want to be socially involved with the lower class. Slowly over time, the lower classes places of work began to develop underground, until there was no need for the workers to go above ground. Like animals, they adapted to their surroundings and developed into the Morlocks. The Time Traveller believes that the Morlocks are the working classes who struggle beneath the more affluent Eloi. This belief seems to be confirmed by the Eloi's appearance. They are above ground and are dressed in rich clothes and never do any work. The Morlocks are a dull white, and have "strange large greyish red ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...
  • 42. The Stolen Bacillus by H.G. Wells Essay The Stolen Bacillus by H.G. Wells This is a story set in the 19th century people had dress codes which reflected your status in society. The dress code was formal and quite severe it was almost as if the longer your top hat the higher up the rank you are in importance in society. In this story we meet a man who wants to help the society and quality of living whereas the other wants to destroy order as he is what's known as an anarchist. This is someone who is feels that people should be responsible for there own actions and decisions meaning they govern their own lives. In the 19th century anarchists were seen as political agitators and sometimes violent. As in this story where we will see a man desperate and willing to go to ... Show more content on Helpwriting.net ... The anarchist is very absurd into thinking that by drinking the potion that he would be able to infect the whole population in the story it says, "He went walking down Waterloo Bridge jostling as many people as possible trying to infect them". The real blow must have come to the anarchist when he realises that that was the wrong phial. We know that this is true as the scientist says," it is a phial which turns things blue so that is the only thing he will achieve". The two characters in the story who are set on big ideas are the Scientist and the anarchist. The scientist is pompous and idealistic and likes the sound of his own voice, as he kept on talking about the bacillus. The anarchist is high flown and self–important, there is a bit of self pity and neglect but then again he is pathetic and can't seek attention in any other way. There is definitely an element of frustration in his life as no–one listens to his ideas or what he has to say this is partly the reason why he wants to cause chaos with the stolen bacillus. We know this as it says, "The world shall hear of him at last. All those people who laughed neglected him and preferred other people to him will consider him now". The characters in the story who show reality are the wife of the scientist and the cabbies. The wife is very down to earth she is more concerned about the way ... Get more on HelpWriting.net ...