ICTs in English How technologies can support effective teaching and learning in English Karen Melhuish Online Professional...
.   Why are we here today? What do we hope to learn? By the end of the session, we will…. “ Give one, get one”
<ul><li>Think of one example of when you have used, or been involved with,  the use of digital technology as part of your ...
Looking more closely at what we do… <ul><li>Consider the example you explained: </li></ul><ul><li>What was the impact on t...
Stepping back to look at the wider context <ul><li>The world in which we live… </li></ul><ul><li>Digital reformation </li>...
Stepping back to look at the wider context <ul><li>Pedagogy: ‘teaching as  inquiry …e-learning can support the teaching ap...
 
A scenario to critique: Miss Smith gives it a go <ul><li>How did she decide  what was important to teach ? And what the st...
An exemplar scenario: War Poetry  Focusing Inquiry <ul><li>Over-arching concepts: </li></ul><ul><li>What is the impact of ...
An exemplar scenario: War Poetry  Teaching Inquiry <ul><li>Teaching strategies  to help them engage with the poem and the ...
An exemplar scenario: War Poetry  Teaching and Learning <ul><li>Engage prior knowledge : brainstorm using Freemind/Inspira...
www.wordle.com
An exemplar scenario: War Poetry  Learning inquiry <ul><li>How  can I monitor/notice the impact on students’ learning? </l...
Return to your own example <ul><li>What would you keep? </li></ul><ul><li>What would you change? </li></ul>
Have we met our success criteria? <ul><li>Review the initial direction we set ourselves….[slide 2] </li></ul>
Where to now?  3-2-1-out! <ul><li>3   ideas  that are worth exploring further </li></ul><ul><li>2  things you have  learne...
A final thought… <ul><li>Learning and Motivation in 21st Century </li></ul><ul><li>http://www. youtube .com/watch? v=K_6GU...
Image sources: <ul><li>Slide 1: ‘Adrian on the computer’ by Bombardier (Flickr CC) </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 3: ‘Students wo...
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WRATE workshop 16 March2010

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This is the presentation that accompanied the WRATE workshop for English teachers on 16 March 2010.

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  • This session offers you an opportunity to look at a range of ideas for using ICT to enhance the way your students engage with text. Using a short story as an example, we will explore how and why web-based applications can provide exciting new ways to explore the key ideas. By the end of the session, you will have a range of approaches and ideas to take away with you that you can adapt or use for your own teaching. Not sure the title is correct - a focus on tools is cart before horse….
  • Co-construct the purpose of the session By the end of the session, we will…. have explored what we think about using technologies, a framework for planning our teaching to align the tools, the content and the pedagogy Touched on a range of examples for what quality e-learning might look like, with some different tools Wesch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o
  • What the standards are/ are not
  • Digital reformation: unprecedented change driven by social and economic drivers, akin to the development of the Gutenburg press. Lifelong learning: not just knowledge is needed but the skills to adapt, change, learn and reflect, to collaborate… User-focused: people can work together, share, ‘the ‘hacker ethic’, the expectation of information sharing, open source Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? - who will guard the guards themselves [Juvenal] - the need to be evaluative, able to discriminate, analytical, what is quality? What is reliable? KAREN and the roll-out of a high-speed network
  • References Literacy Learning Progressions and e-learning: http://elearningbop.wikispaces.com/End+of+Year+10 eLearning as Inquiry: a framework: http://elearningasinquiry.tki.org.nz/What-is-e-Learning-as-Inquiry eLearning as Inquiry: integrating e-learning into your literacy teaching: http://elearningasinquiry.tki.org.nz/ Digistore: Digital storehouse: http://digistore.tki.org.nz/ec/p/home Alton-Lee, A. (2003). Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best Evidence Synthesis. 
Alton-Lee identifies characteristics of quality teaching that are associated with high-quality outcomes for diverse students. One of these is that 田 urriculum goals, resources including ICT usage, task design and teaching are effectively aligned � . The research-based characteristics she associates with this outcome include curricular alignment, the integration of ICT into pedagogical practice across the curriculum, and whole-school alignment that optimises opportunities to learn.
 http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2515/5959 Becta (2003). What the Research Says about ICT and Motivation. 
This report by the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (Becta) is one of a series that analyses the available evidence on the use of ICT in education. It concludes that ICT can stimulate, motivate and spark students � appetites for learning and helps to create a culture of success. This can be demonstrated in students � increased commitment to the learning task, their enhanced enjoyment, interest, and sense of achievement in learning when using ICT, and their enhanced self-esteem.
 http://partners.becta.org.uk/index.php?section =rh&amp;rid=13660 Higgins, S. (2003). Does ICT Improve Teaching and Learning in Schools? BERA Professional User Review. Newcastle, UK: University of Newcastle. 
This peer review of research from the United Kingdom draws largely on 200 reports and articles that were reviewed for the Teacher Training Agency 痴 study into Effective Pedagogy Using Information and Communications Technology for Literacy and Numeracy in Primary Schools. It provides a useful and accessible resource that identifies some key messages for practice. Higgins cautions that although ICT can improve teaching and learning, there are important issues that need to be considered if it is to make a difference.
 http://www.bera.ac.uk/blog/2008/07/reviews/ Software for Learning: http://softwareforlearning.tki.org.nz/
  • The e-Learning as Inquiry diagram shows four areas of inquiry and the relationship between them. &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Learning” &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot; form one area of inquiry. When considering &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot;, the key question for teachers to ask is: &amp;quot;How do I integrate digital content into effective teaching practice?&amp;quot; When considering &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot;, the key question is: &amp;quot;How can I use digital content to co-construct new learning with my students?” &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot; are linked to the next area, &amp;quot;Learning Inquiry&amp;quot;. &amp;quot;Learning Inquiry”: The key question to ask in &amp;quot;Learning Inquiry&amp;quot; is: &amp;quot;What happened as a result of the teaching, and what are the implications for future teaching?&amp;quot; This leads to two related questions: &amp;quot;How do I monitor the impact of my teaching on students&apos; learning?&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;What have I learned about the use of digital content in literacy teaching?&amp;quot;If, from this inquiry, the question &amp;quot;Is there something I need to change or learn?&amp;quot; arises, a link is established with &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot;. On the other hand, if the questions &amp;quot;What are the next steps for learning?&amp;quot; or &amp;quot;How can I support the transfer of this learning?&amp;quot; arise, a link is established with &amp;quot;Focusing Inquiry&amp;quot;. &amp;quot;Focusing Inquiry”: &amp;quot;Focusing Inquiry&amp;quot; involves asking the key question: &amp;quot;What is important (and therefore worth spending time on), given where my students are at?&amp;quot; There are two related questions: &amp;quot;What do I need to find out about my students&apos; literacy and e-learning needs and strengths?&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;What are my own needs and strengths in an e-learning context?” &amp;quot;Focusing Inquiry&amp;quot; is linked to &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot;. &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry”: The key question in &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot; is &amp;quot;What strategies (evidence-based) are most likely to help my students learn this?&amp;quot; There are three related questions: &amp;quot;Would digital content be effective to support student learning?&amp;quot;, &amp;quot;How do I choose appropriate digital content?&amp;quot;, and &amp;quot;What e-learning strategies could I use to support the needs of specific groups of learners?” &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot; is linked to &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot;, creating a circular cycle. http://elearningasinquiry.tki.org.nz/What-is-e-Learning-as-Inquiry/Description-e-Learning-as-Inquiry-framework-diagram
  • Use ‘Give one, get one’ to exchange ideas &amp;quot;What is important (and therefore worth spending time on), given where my students are at?&amp;quot; Be able to read for meaning, to identify audience and purpose and unpack that by reference to language, structure etc. There are two related questions: &amp;quot;What do I need to find out about my students&apos; literacy and e-learning needs and strengths?” Literacy needs: what are the challenges in vocabulary, form, structure, context (consider recent assessment data on Reading - this may generate particular literacy goals for, say, inference, reading for meaning). See Effective Literacy Practice. What can they already do in terms of technologies? What are their interests? What is manageable? &amp;quot;What are my own needs and strengths in an e-learning context?” Do I understand how I can use the technologies that would work for this? Do I understand how to support them with the areas of need in literacy?
  • The key question in &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot; is &amp;quot;What strategies (evidence-based) are most likely to help my students learn this?&amp;quot; There are three related questions: &amp;quot;Would digital content be effective to support student learning?” Prior knowledge and making connections: source materials from WW2 and present day wars. Freemind: capture existing knowledge and make connections &amp;quot;How do I choose appropriate digital content?” Digital content must help them make connections, form predictions and support the learning intentions. Students must be suported in their literacy so they can navigate the content. &amp;quot;What e-learning strategies could I use to support the needs of specific groups of learners?” Vary the content they experience Ensure that I select a range that acknowledges different needs; provide choice Pay deliberate attention to culture diversity and foster this (ako)
  • &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot; form one area of inquiry. When considering &amp;quot;Teaching&amp;quot;, the key question for teachers to ask is: &amp;quot;How do I integrate digital content into effective teaching practice?&amp;quot; Prior knowledge: Freemind/Inspiration Make connections: Webquests on WW1, Youtube, select two sites on different wwars Form a hypothesis on the main question ‘What is the impact…?’ Read for meaning Watch YouTube video first Break down the poem into sections: groups explore and explain the meaning through the use of Google images/drama/digital essay Language: Integrate a range of texts into Wordle to provoke discussion on imagery Compare the key images with the YouTube animation of the poem. Critique is portrayal. When considering &amp;quot;Learning&amp;quot;, the key question is: &amp;quot;How can I use digital content to co-construct new learning with my students?” Groups develop questions about the poem (on, between and beyond the lines) and post to a wiki. Different students respond. On the wiki or in a class blog, they post responses to the over-arching question OR present their findings in a digital essay (iMovie) OR develop a Voicethread response.. References: Dulce et Decorum Est: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4Lzo_EXXOQ
  • The key question to ask in &amp;quot;Learning Inquiry&amp;quot; is: &amp;quot;What happened as a result of the teaching, and what are the implications for future teaching?&amp;quot; This leads to two related questions: &amp;quot;How do I monitor the impact of my teaching on students&apos; learning?” HOW DO YOU MONITOR NOW? Contributions in class, on the wiki etc. Assess their ability to analyse, construct a response of their own in written/visual/oral forms. Use the LLP and the NZC. &amp;quot;What have I learned about the use of digital content in literacy teaching?&amp;quot;If, from this inquiry, the question &amp;quot;Is there something I need to change or learn?&amp;quot; arises, a link is established with &amp;quot;Teaching Inquiry&amp;quot;. On the other hand, if the questions &amp;quot;What are the next steps for learning?&amp;quot; or &amp;quot;How can I support the transfer of this learning?&amp;quot; arise, a link is established with &amp;quot;Focusing Inquiry&amp;quot;.
  • Learning and Motivation in 21st Century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_6GUx1Zx0w&amp;feature=related
  • WRATE workshop 16 March2010

    1. 1. ICTs in English How technologies can support effective teaching and learning in English Karen Melhuish Online Professional Learning © Learning Media Ltd., Wellington, New Zealand
    2. 2. . Why are we here today? What do we hope to learn? By the end of the session, we will…. “ Give one, get one”
    3. 3. <ul><li>Think of one example of when you have used, or been involved with, the use of digital technology as part of your English teaching. </li></ul><ul><li>Describe what happened this with a partner (2mins) </li></ul>Starting with what we do….
    4. 4. Looking more closely at what we do… <ul><li>Consider the example you explained: </li></ul><ul><li>What was the impact on the students’ behaviour ? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you know? </li></ul>What was the impact on the students’ learning ? How do you know?
    5. 5. Stepping back to look at the wider context <ul><li>The world in which we live… </li></ul><ul><li>Digital reformation </li></ul><ul><li>Lifelong, ‘21st Century’ learning </li></ul><ul><li>User-focused paradigms </li></ul><ul><li>Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? </li></ul><ul><li>Economic and social drivers e.g. KAREN </li></ul>
    6. 6. Stepping back to look at the wider context <ul><li>Pedagogy: ‘teaching as inquiry …e-learning can support the teaching approaches (p. 36) </li></ul>Vision: ‘ Connected …lifelong learners…’ Key Competencies: ‘Using language, symbols and texts… intellectual curiousity …participating and contributing..’ English: ‘learn to deconstuct and critically interrogate texts..make and create meaning’ Literacy: ‘each learning area has its own language’
    7. 8. A scenario to critique: Miss Smith gives it a go <ul><li>How did she decide what was important to teach ? And what the students needed? </li></ul><ul><li>How did she choose her strategies ? And the digital content ? </li></ul><ul><li>How was the digital content integrated into the learning? And how was new knowledge co-constructed ? </li></ul><ul><li>What happened as a result of the teaching? </li></ul><ul><li>What might be the next steps , from a teaching and a digital point of view? </li></ul>
    8. 9. An exemplar scenario: War Poetry Focusing Inquiry <ul><li>Over-arching concepts: </li></ul><ul><li>What is the impact of war on people and environments? </li></ul><ul><li>Context: ’Dulce et decorum est’ / WW1 </li></ul><ul><li>My students’ learning needs? </li></ul><ul><li>The literacy demands of the poem (language/structure/context/prior knowledge) </li></ul><ul><li>Elearning needs?: </li></ul><ul><li>How media literate are they? What Web 2.0 tools can they use? </li></ul><ul><li>What are my own needs? </li></ul><ul><li>I need to understand how to support students’ literacy needs </li></ul><ul><li>I need to make sure I can scaffold their elearning needs </li></ul><ul><li>I need to know the affordances of suitable technology </li></ul>
    9. 10. An exemplar scenario: War Poetry Teaching Inquiry <ul><li>Teaching strategies to help them engage with the poem and the over-arching question: </li></ul><ul><li>Engage prior knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Make connections </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Test hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>Understand main idea, audience and purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Infer, analyse, evaluate </li></ul>Would digital content help this? How will I choose this?
    10. 11. An exemplar scenario: War Poetry Teaching and Learning <ul><li>Engage prior knowledge : brainstorm using Freemind/Inspiration </li></ul><ul><li>Make connections : WW1 Webquest; comparison of WW1 and modern war articles </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions : collaborate on three-level guide style questions and post to wiki for collaborative response </li></ul><ul><li>Understand main idea , audience and purpose: shared/guided reading, watch and critique a Youtube version, use Wordle as a starting point for imagery and vocabulary, students select images from Google Images/Creatve Commons to illustrate and explain the meaning of different sections. </li></ul><ul><li>Infer, analyse, evaluate : discuss the main question via blog/online forum/Voicethread </li></ul>
    11. 12. www.wordle.com
    12. 13. An exemplar scenario: War Poetry Learning inquiry <ul><li>How can I monitor/notice the impact on students’ learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom observation </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of poem in an essay/digital essay/collaborative wiki response - look at Aos and assessment schedule </li></ul>What are the next steps for their learning, and for my learning? What have I learned about the integration of digital content? What do I need to change or learn?
    13. 14. Return to your own example <ul><li>What would you keep? </li></ul><ul><li>What would you change? </li></ul>
    14. 15. Have we met our success criteria? <ul><li>Review the initial direction we set ourselves….[slide 2] </li></ul>
    15. 16. Where to now? 3-2-1-out! <ul><li>3 ideas that are worth exploring further </li></ul><ul><li>2 things you have learned </li></ul><ul><li>1 point for action , for yourself or your school </li></ul>
    16. 17. A final thought… <ul><li>Learning and Motivation in 21st Century </li></ul><ul><li>http://www. youtube .com/watch? v=K_6GUx1Zx0w &feature=related </li></ul>
    17. 18. Image sources: <ul><li>Slide 1: ‘Adrian on the computer’ by Bombardier (Flickr CC) </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 3: ‘Students working on class assignments in the computer lab’ by ExtraKetchup (Flickr CC) </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 4: by ‘Playing with magnifying glass’ Somegeekintn (Flickr CC) </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 5: It’s future is in our hands by aussiegall (Flickr CC) </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 7: from Literacy Online TKI: elearnng as inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 11: Bluff Signpost by Rob Young </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 12: 'Different sides’ by JP<3 </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 13: Question mark and arrow by laurakgibbs </li></ul>

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