Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Activity 10-vessels-circulation

58,265 views

Published on

Blood vessels and circulation

Published in: Education

Activity 10-vessels-circulation

  1. 1. Activity #10: Vessels and Circulation Chapter 23 – McKinley et al., Human Anatomy, 4e. Objectives: • Observe and sketch histology slide of an artery and a vein and identify structures on each. • Identify structures and vessels involved in pulmonary circulation on cadavers and classroom models. • Identify structures and vessels involved in systemic circulation (by region) on cadavers and classroom models. 1Compilation: Lisa Radmall
  2. 2. Vessels: Layers of Vessel Wall 2 • Tunica intima • Thin, innermost layer of vessel wall. • Endothelium and thin layer of areolar connective tissue. • Tunica media • Middle layer of vessel wall, thickest layer in arteries. • Smooth muscle cells, circular arrangement for vasoconstriction when contracted and vasodilation when relaxed. • Tunica externa • Outermost layer of vessel wall, thickest layer in veins. • Areolar connective tissue, helps to anchor vessels to other structures.
  3. 3. Vessels: Layers of Vessel Wall 3Fig. 23.1
  4. 4. Vessels: System Comparison 4Fig. 23.3
  5. 5. Vessels: Histology 5Fig. 23.2
  6. 6. Vessels: Histology 6
  7. 7. Vessels: Identification on Cadavers 7 • Arteries • Round shape • Collapse when ‘pinched’ (hollow lumen) • Rebounds to round shape • Veins • Flat shape • Usually collapsed • Often dark in color • Nerves • Round shape • Does not collapse when ‘pinched’ (contains nerve fibers)
  8. 8. Circulation: Overview 8 Pulmonary Circulation carries deoxygenated blood from right ventricle through pulmonary trunk and ultimately to capillary beds of the lungs, then carries oxygenated blood back through the pulmonary veins to the left atrium.
  9. 9. Circulation: Overview 9 Systemic circulation carries oxygenated blood from the left ventricle of the heart through the aorta, ultimately to the capillary beds of systemic body organs, then carries deoxygenated blood back to the right atrium Note: Coronary arterial and venous circulation is also part of systemic circulation and was covered in the previous laboratory activity.
  10. 10. Pulmonary Circulation 10 Left Right pulmonary veins Right pulmonary artery Left pulmonary artery Left pulmonary capillaries Right pulmonary capillaries
  11. 11. Systemic Circulation: Arterial Flow Away From Heart 11 Aorta – Carries oxygenated blood from the left ventricle to body organs and tissues. • Ascending aorta • Left & right coronary arteries. Supplies heart muscle. • (A) Aortic arch - ABCs • (B) Brachiocephalic trunk • (C) Left common carotid artery • (S) Left subclavian artery • Descending Aorta • Descending thoracic aorta (above diaphragm) • Descending abdominal aorta (below diaphragm) Aortic Arch (B) Brachiocephalic trunk (C) Left Common Carotid Artery (S) Left Subclavian Artery
  12. 12. Systemic Circulation: Venous Return to Heart 12 • Superior vena cava • Returns deoxygenated blood from head, neck, thorax, and upper limbs to right atrium. • Inferior vena cava • Returns deoxygenated blood from the lower limbs, abdomen, and perineum to right atrium. • Coronary sinus • Returns deoxygenated blood from heart muscle to right atrium.
  13. 13. Systemic Circulation: Blood Flow to/from Heart 13Fig. 22.5b
  14. 14. Circulation: Head and Neck – Arterial Supply 14Fig. 23.10a
  15. 15. Circulation: Head and Neck – Arterial Supply 15Fig. 23.11a
  16. 16. Circulation: Head and Neck – Venous Drainage 16Fig. 23.11b
  17. 17. Circulation: Head and Neck – Venous Drainage 17Fig. 23.10b
  18. 18. Circulation: Ventral Cavity – Arterial Supply 18Fig. 23.12
  19. 19. Circulation: Ventral Cavity – Celiac Trunk 19Fig. 23.15a
  20. 20. Circulation: Ventral Cavity – Mesenteric Arteries 20Fig. 23.15b
  21. 21. Circulation: Ventral Cavity – Venous Drainage 21Fig. 23.13
  22. 22. Circulation: Hepatic Portal System 22 A portal system consists of two capillary beds in a series connected by a portal vein. The hepatic portal system is a venous network that drains the GI tract and shunts blood to the liver for absorption and processing of transported materials. (p.703) Blood drained from the abdominal organs is processed in the liver’s wide sinusoid capillaries before returning to systemic venous circulation. (1st capillary beds) (2nd capillary bed)
  23. 23. Circulation: Hepatic Portal System 23Fig. 23.16
  24. 24. Circulation: Hepatic Portal System Mnemonic 24Table 23.3 Visual Mnemonic: The location of the main veins of the hepatic portal system seem to form a visual “chair” when isolated.
  25. 25. Circulation: Arterial Supply to Upper Limb 25Fig. 23.19a **All vessels are paired** (right and left sides)
  26. 26. Circulation: Venous Return to Upper Limb 26Fig. 23.19b **All vessels are paired** (right and left sides)
  27. 27. Circulation: Arterial Supply to Lower Limb 27Fig. 23.20a **All vessels are paired** (right and left sides)
  28. 28. Circulation: Venous Return to Lower Limb 28Fig. 23.20b **All vessels are paired** (right and left sides)
  29. 29. Circulatory System - Summary 29
  30. 30. Circulatory System – Plastinated Vessels 30
  31. 31. Image References 31 Pulmonary Circulation: https://healthconspiracyblog.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/heart.jpg, www.ck12.org

×