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UX Australia 2016 - State Library of Victoria Service Redesign - Chris O'Brien (Meld Studios) 240816

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More and more projects are looking to integrate digital and physical service environments, delivering a cohesive experience to customers as they interact with the organisation across many different channels.

The State Library of Victoria attracts nearly two million visitors a year and even more than that through its online channels and phone-based services. It has a rich history and plays a central role in the cultural life of Victoria.

In 2014 the Library underwent a comprehensive re-design of its service delivery, working closely with Meld Studios over a thirteen week period. During the project the team embarked on a series of activities aimed at understanding the service context of this institution. Along the way, the team not only learned about the Library, it also learned a few lessons about large-scale service design projects.

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UX Australia 2016 - State Library of Victoria Service Redesign - Chris O'Brien (Meld Studios) 240816

  1. 1. STORIES FROM THE
 SERVICE REDESIGN OF 
 THE STATE LIBRARY OF VICTORIA AND WHAT WE LEARNED ALONG THE WAY Chris O’Brien
 Senior designer, Meld Studios 
 chris@meldstudios.com
  2. 2. WORK TOGETHER, LEARN TOGETHER NOTICE THE LITTLE THINGS MAP IT OUT, PUBLICLY PROTOTYPE BEFORE YOU’RE READY 1. 2. 3. 4.
  3. 3. ABOUT THE LIBRARY
  4. 4. ABOUT THE PROJECT
  5. 5. PROJECT OBJECTIVES Process optimisation Resolve staffing tensions Align service delivery with customer needs Reduce costs and drive self service Broader themes Beyond government funding Respond to changing demographics Understand the role of the library in the digital age Unofficially, do all of this in an environment where many were 
 deeply suspicious of external consultants
  6. 6. UNDERSTAND (5 weeks) Research Analysis & Synthesis EXPLORE (4 weeks) Opportunity identification Concept generation Prototype and test ARTICULATE (3 weeks) Refine concepts Document Socialise WHAT WE DID IN 12 WEEKS
  7. 7. THE PROJECTTEAM 72 CHRIS DOM BRIDIE BEN STEVE JUSTINE
  8. 8. WORKING WITH BEN AND BRIDIE
  9. 9. 1.Work on site 2.Blend the team 3. Design with them, not at them LESSON 1. WORK TOGETHER, LEARN TOGETHER
  10. 10. OBSERVATIONAL RESEARCHOBSERVATIONAL RESEARCH
  11. 11. 1. It’s worth taking the time to look 2. Look for hacks and workarounds 3. Don’t be afraid to ask people what they’re doing LESSON 2. NOTICE THE
 LITTLE THINGS
  12. 12. SENSE MAKING AND JOURNEY MAPPING
  13. 13. SIGNAGE • The library is very hard to identify externally. While it looks like a major civic building, there is no obvious signage above either entrance to indicate that this is indeed the State Library of Victoria. • On approaching the Swanston St entrance, the current exhibition signs dominate, causing confusion around the purpose of the building - is it an art gallery? • The La Trobe St cafe entrance also provides no indication that this is also an entry point for the library. MEETING PLACE • The State Library of Victoria is an iconic building in the heart of the city, and as such is regularly used as a recognisable and known landmark. • As a Melbourne landmark, the library forecourt is used as a daily meeting point, and relaxation space for the citizens of Melbourne, and visitors to the city. • The forecourt area is also regularly used by social, political, religious, and commercial groups. Buskers are a regular feature, playing for the audience on the steps and lawn areas. • The library lawns are unique in the centre of Melbourne city, and attract significant volumes of visitors. Foyer LAYOUT • There is no logical ground floor - visitors enter the builidng on level 2, causing confusion as visitors attempt to orientate themselves. • The foyer offers 8 possible exit points, creating a clear wayfinding challenge. • As the first recognisable information point, the foyer desk is heavily used as an enquiry point as visitors enter the building. This desk receives the highest volume of enquiries in the library. SIGNAGE • The foyer fails to explain the purpose of the building, who it is for, and what will be found within. • Signage for the current exhibition overwhelm library specific signs. Visitors could easily assume they have entered a gallery, or a museum. • There is minimal explaination of the library collection and services beyond the foyer. • Signs to ajoining rooms are unclear - ‘Palmer Hall’, ‘Keith Murdoch’, ‘Trescothwick Information Centre’. There are no signs that refer to the collection itself. • Confusing/absent signage means the service desk receives basic enquiries on the role of the building, who is welcome, and what services it offers. Forecourt LAYOUT • The library only has two public entrances, on Swanston and La Trobe Streets. There is no public access via Little Lonsdale or Russell Streets. • The front door signage however indicates 5 entrances to the building, leading to visitor confusion. • The primary entrance on Swanston Street also acts as the primary exit, causing significant congestion. • The congestion at the entrance point is exacerbated during inclement weather. REFUGE • The library is one of the few locations in the centre of Melbourne that welcomes all visitors without predjudice, and as such is a regular place of refuge for the socially disadvantaged. • The forecourt is a space where visitors feel comfortable to relax, and sprawl out in the sun. During good weather the lawns and steps will be full of visitors using it as an place of rest. REFUGE • The foyer takes over the role of the forecourt during poor weather, and will be full of people simply looking for a place to sit, relax, and keep dry. • The foyer is also frequently used by the socially disadvanted, who are not generally moved on by security staff. These visitors can often seen sleeping on a comfortable chair. MEETING PLACE • The foyer acts as a primary meeting place, especially during inclement weather. • At any point in the day, the foyer will be populated by students, researchers, tour groups, tourists, school groups, backpackers, and staff. • As a focal point for meeting peers, the foyer will regularly become congested, with groups of waiting people obscuring signage and entrance/exit points. • The foyer service desk receives many general enquries from visitors, including directions to basic services - toilets, water, lockers, as well as directions to locations within, and outside the library. Palmer Hall LAYOUT • Palmer Hall acts as a link between the La Trobe St cafe entrance, and the foyer of the library. • Palmer Hall is the first area of the library to open in the mornings, opening with the cafe, before the general library opens at 10am. With the hall opening, visitors have access to lockers, toilets, and water, but cannot proceed into the foyer area. • Palmer Hall also provides access to the Readings book store. SIGNAGE • There is no obvious indication that Palmer Hall will lead visitors into the library. Signage is lacking externally from La Trobe St, within the cafe, and within Palmer Hall itself. • The name Palmer Hall does not indicate the services contained within. REFUGE • A very limited number of desks and seats are available to visitors who do not wish to proceed further into the library to access basic services. At most times of the day these desks will be populated by tourists, and other visitors who prefer not to use the lockers. LOCKERS • Lockers are provided by a third party, and cater for visitors who are unable to carry their belongings inside the library, due to size and food/beverage constraints, or visitors who simply do not wish to carry their possessions for the day. • The locker area is staffed by a third party from midday, with foyer desk staff fielding enquiries at other times, or when visitors do not recognise the third party staff. POWER • Power points used within Palmer Hall are frequently used by visitors who do not wish, or are not able to proceed beyond the security point. • These points are regularly used by visitors as a place to quickly charge their devices while in the CBD, without engaging with other library services. • As these power points are regularly used by tourists, foreign adaptors are often seen in this area. WATER • Water points are available adjacent to the toilets in Palmer Hall, and can be accessed without needing to go through the security point. TOILETS • These toilets are accessible before the security point, and act as toilets for cafe visitors, and the general public. • As the easiest toilets to access, they are often used as a washroom for the socially disadvantaged. Keith Murdoch Gallery SIGNAGE • Signage for the gallery overwhelms the foyer, causing visitors to question whether they have entered a gallery, or a library. • The label Keith Murdoch does not provide a clear indication of what the space contains. TOILETS • Toilets are situated at the back of the gallery, although these are invisible to the majority of visitors. Keith Murdoch Gallery eminar rooms mr tulk toilets information VICTORIA Staffed from 12pm promotions TOUR piranesiexhibition piranesiexhibition TOUR STATE LIBRARY OF VICTORIA 10am Can I borrow books? CHECK-MATE! Is this a library or a museum? Dome reading room? Which way to the library? Is this the library? Can I enter from here? Library? I’m at the library near the chess sets. We’re in the foyer. When will you get here? I don’t want to pay for the lockers... My bag’s too big. Help! Where’s the library? Library tour? What’s on the other side? What can I do here? How do I go up? Where are the lifts? Bag too big. Need to store in lockers over there. WELCOME! Can I help you? But those people can get in with their bags! Photocopiers? Toilets? CHECK-MATE! WELCOME! Can I help you? TOUR promotionsFree samples! TOUR Where’s the library? Keith Murdoch Gallery SIGNAGE • Signage for the gallery overwhelms the foyer, causing visitors to question whether they have entered a gallery, or a library. • The label Keith Murdoch does not provide a clear indication of what the space contains. TOILETS • Toilets are situated at the back of the gallery, although these are invisible to the majority of visitors. Security LAYOUT • The security gates act as a major barrier and bottleneck to visitors - it is not possible to enter the library beyond the foyer without passing through security. • The security gates dominate the entrance to the library, with visitors often unsure of whether they are able to proceed through the barrier. • No large bags, or food/drinks (except water) are permitted beyond the security gates. As a result, the foyer becomes an area to eat/drink, before proceeding into the library. • Security restrictions are arbitrarily enforced, depending on individual staff, and visitor traffic. • The staircases are blocked, closing the most direct route to the La Trobe reading room. • During special events, these staircases may be opened to allow visitor access to La Trobe and Queens Hall. SECURITY • Security staff are a highly visible presence within the foyer, both through their uniforn, and demeanour. • Security uniforms are recognisable, but not in keeping with general library staff. • Security can be very welcoming, or somewhat intimidating, dependent on the individual staff members. • During regular hours, security staff are on call to provide lost property, first aid, and accessibility services. • Beyond 5pm security provide the only staff presence in the library foyer, and will consequently field all visitor enquiries. SIGNAGE • Conditions of entry signs are long, and ineffective. Visitor behaviour and queries indicate that signage is either not noticed, or not read. • Conditions of entry signs are are also unfriendly, and do not provide a welcome to the library. Information Centre LAYOUT • The circular nature of the room makes it hard to orientate on entry. This is somewhat alleviated by the highly visible path through to the lift area, but is exacerbated when entering the space from one of the ajoining rooms. • Many services are hidden from view. On entry to the room it is very difficult to locate the Dome lifts, collection retreivals, and assisted technology rooms SIGNAGE • The purpose, role, and services of the library are not made clear. New visitors do not understand whether the library is for them, or what they can do within it. Many incorrectly assume they will be able to borrow books, and take them home. • Where signage exists, it is often only readable close-up, such as signs indicating catalogue computers. • Signs indicating the most direct routes to the Dome galleries are frequently missed. • Signage indicating core facilities - water, toilets, wifi, etc - are inadequate, or missing. • Signs are not always at the point of need, causing an increased volume of service desk enquiries. • The central column digital signs are positioned in a thoroughfare, rather than at a decision point, and are largely ignored by visitors • Staff are difficult to identify, with inconsistent use of uniforms and identification. Where visitors are able to identify staff, they are not able to distinguish between service staff, librarians, and back of house staff. • Staff presence at service desks overshadows the signs and pamphlets situated on and around the desk. MEETING PLACE • The space is used for a huge variety of reasons,, besides collection access, including job interviews, tutoring, business meetings, religious discussions, and group study. • The Information Centre is also a highly sought after space within the library. Once a desk is taken it will often be held for hours to unofficially reserve it. REFUGE • The Information Centre provides a comfortable place for people seeking refuge, and an opportunity for the socially disadvantaged to feel a part of the community. • Free access is provided to facilities, without discrimination. • The welcome provided to the socially disadvantaged can present challenges to visitors and staff due to antisocial behaviour. Lift area LAYOUT • This area provides the only route to the upstairs reading rooms, via the stairs, or lifts. • Lifts are used by visitors and staff, and stop at staff-only levels using a security pass. • Toilets and water services are located in this area, but are hidden in the back, and not easily noticed. • Staff corridors are accessed via a door near the ladies toilets, causing congestion for visitors. SIGNAGE • Unclear signage leads to increased use of lifts. • Available signage is small, and lack of emphasis and heirarchy makes it difficult to idenitfy the most important or relevant rooms. • Signage uses room names, rather than contents or purpose - e.g. La Trobe vs. Australiana Redmond Barry Reading Room LAYOUT • Key services are hidden - journals, printers, help phones • Noise levels in the room are controlled organically. While Redmond Barry is not a designated quiet room, visitors self manage noise levels, leading it to effectively act as a quiet room. • The mezzanine floor provides some of the most private work spaces in the library, and consequently these desks are much in demand. This demand can make it difficult for visitors wishing to work with the collection, unless they arrive early. • The collection, and services located on the mezzanine are largely hidden, and only discovered by exploration. • There are no lifts in this room, and the mezzanine can only be publically reached via the stairs, causing signficant accessibility issues. Visitors with mobility issues can only gain access to the mezzanine via staff lifts through prior arrangement with security staff. SIGNAGE • The purpose of the room is not explained. While the space contains very specific collections (e.g. Computing, Science, Social Sciences, etc) this can only be understood by close inspection. • Very little can be ascertained at a distance. • Signage is inconsistenly applied throughout the room, with huge variation in formats, palettes, and typefaces • Accessibility signage is poor - a disabled visitor would need to manually visit all four stair cases to understand there is no lift access to the mezzanine. • Collection signage is not understandable to new visitors. There is no indication of what each shelf contains, beyond the incomprehensible Dewey numbering. • ‘Do not reshelve’ signs leave visitors unsure of how they should interact with open access collection. • Instructional signage unclear - computer booking and location poorly explained. WATER • The water fountain is situated by the entrance to the male toilets, which is unappealing, and effectively blocks it from use by women. • The water fountain is used frequently by male library visitors to refill water bottles, although an appropriate tap is not provided. • Female visitors fill water bottles using the taps inside the female toilets. • The water fountain is inaccessible when the male toilets are being cleaned. TOILETS • These toilets are heavily used by visitors, with the majority of Redmond Barry and La Trobe visitors using these toilets during their study/work breaks. • The women’s toilets are regularly obstructed by staff entering/exiting staff corridors MEETING SPACE • Used regularly for quiet collaborative study, or as a place for independent study with friends. • Similar use to the Information Centre, but used by visitors more familiar with the library and in need of a quieter space. • The round tables are used regularly by groups of students. • The ability to work alongside one another is important for many students. • Many students will use this space on a daily or weekly basis, often at the same desks. • Visitors will arrive early in the morning to reserve their favourite desks. • Visitors will stay for long periods of time - all day, or until closing. WATER • Large water bottles are brought in by visitors working throughout the day. POWER • Powered desks attract visitors, who may never interact with the collections. Cowen Gallery LAYOUT • The clash of contexts as visitors transition between library spaces causes confusion. Eg. computer room (TIC) to art gallery (Cowen) to reading room (Redmond Barry). SIGNAGE • Signage indicating pathway to ajoining rooms is hard to spot, and can be ambiguous. • The Heritage Reading Room signage is hidden within the Blue Rotunda, with poor line of sight from the Cowen Gallery. • Gold lettering used in room signs can be hard to discern from a distance. • Signs pointing to other exhibitions (Dome Galleries, Keith Murdoch) are very limited. POWER • There is a huge demand for power. At the start of each day there is a rush by visitors to gain powered desks. Desks without power will be the last to fill. • As desks fill up visitors will choose places to work based on access to power, with many electing to sit on the floor to reach power. • Library equipment is unplugged by visitors needing available power points. • Many users will charge multiple devices, and need multiple power points at each desk. TOILETS • Directions to toilets is the most commonly asked question at the service desk. • There are three sets of toilets on this floor, but none are clearly marked. • Baby change facilities are not signposted. • Many visitors will leave their belongings to reserve desks when going to the toilets. Assisted technology Lift area Cowen Gallery COPY CENTRE online database online database start here ask research assisted technology male toilets female toilets staff only SMS print 6. Dome 5. Galleries 4. Galleries 3. La Trobe 2A. Redmond... 2. 1. Staff only WATER redmond barry 231 Toilets? OW! information Dome? Is this even a quiet room? So where are the books? Sorry. Going down! Water? Toilets? Can I borrow books? Baby facilities? Redmond Barry? Heritage reading? W info Where is... Catalogue computers? Prayer room? Toilets? Redmond Barry reading room? Now what... Photocopiers? Help! Do you work here? Now you tell me! That would have been handy... Sorry these seats are reserved for friends... y= 2x+4z+27? Correct! How do I go up? Where are the lifts? Geography? Journals? Computer 19? Help! Staff? B. RB 236.445.766 internet booking station SHHH!SHHH! Toilets? SHHH!SHHH! So where are the books? OW! Foyer INFORMATION REQUESTS • Foyer service desk acts as first line of enquiry. • Foyer staff will act as tourist and directional information source. • Foyer staff will try to respond to non- collection based information requests using web searches, where time permits. • If a query relates to the collection, foyer staff will direct visitors to the Information Centre to continue their enquiry. OPEN ACCESS • Foyer staff will field many enquiries asking about purpose and role of the library - if people are permitted, can books be borrowed, how to find books, etc. Many of these could be dealt with through clearer signage. RESEARCH GUIDES • Offsite staff may refer customers to research guides online. • Staff may also refer to research guides themselves to assist in answering customer queries. DEFERRED ENQUIRIES • If a query cannot be answered on the spot, it may be entered into Reftracker so it can be answered later with more time, and (if required) more expertise. Queries may be tagged to an individual or team with relevant knowledge, where appropriate. • Reftracker is also frequently used as an informal knowledgebase for enquiries, with all previously logged enquiries and answers searchable. Offsite room COLLECTION REQUESTS • Responds to phone, email, and chat enquiries. • Internal help phones are answered by offsite staff • Staff will search and perform collection requests on behalf of external customers. • Staff may also talk customers through the online request process. • Where a request cannot be completed online (as it is part of heritage collection, in offsite storage, or unbarcoded), staff will complete the required request forms on behalf of customers. • Staff may also phone directly to storage areas and request item over the phone (paperwork will be then be completed by the team on the other side). • Handwritten forms are collected 3 times per day, at 9, 12, and 3. News/Genealogy GENEALOGY TRAINING • Visitors require a great deal of assistance when starting their search for their family history. • Research is ongoing, and can often take weeks, or months. • Visitors spend long periods of time using the room, equipment, and resources. • Staff will ask for visitor’s current family knowledge, and then explain an appropriate place in the library’s collection to start their research. • Staff will frequently perform searches on international births, deaths, and marriages databases on the customer’s behalf. • With a basic understanding of the family member in question, staff will then demonstrate links beween known data, and the library collection. EQUIPMENT SUPPORT • Most of the library’s geneaology and newspaper collection is stored on Microfilm/Microfische, and needs equipment to view. • Staff are on hand to provide basic support in using equipment. • Basic guides to each device exist, although customers will consistently go straight to staff rather than self serve. • Customers will ask any member of staff for help, including those passing by on their way to staff areas. Staff areas RESEARCH GUIDES • Created and maintained by librarians. • Customers can add comments, but cannot alter content (wiki style), even if they have expert knowledge. DEFERRED ENQUIRIES • Reftracker is monitored by the Digital Access team, with deferred enquiries referred to either an individual, or a team with relevant knowledge. • Many queries are answered collaboratively by staff int he work area - e.g “Does anyone here know about military history?” Information Centre INFORMATION REQUESTS • Staff receive a huge variety of requests for information, that may, or may not require collection material to answer. • Staff conduct reference interviews to understand question, and determine how SLV can help. • An on-the-spot response may be possible through staff knowledge, or from a quick catalogue/web search, or online database query. • Staff may direct the visitor to catalogue or internet PCs to self-help. • Staff may also refer to an external source for assistance - e.g. other government bodies, non profit organisations, etc. • Information request may develop into collection request for one or more items. COLLECTION REQUESTS • Customers may arrive with a specific item in mind for their request. • Staff may direct customers to catalogue PCs, or perform the query themselves. • Customers are not able to easily print a catalogue reference within the library, and will need to note down (or photgraph) the relevant details. • If an item is in open access, visitors should be able to self-serve, finding the item in the relevant reading room. • Items in onsite storage can be requested directly through the catalogue, where the visitor is already registered. If not already registered, the visitor will need to register online, or at the service desk. • Where a request cannot be completed online (as it is part of heritage collection, in offsite storage, or unbarcoded), a prompt to call a phone number is given. • Typically customers will opt to talk to desk staff, rather than placing a request phone call from within the library. • Staff may direct customers to the La Trobe desk to complete the request process. Depending on the staff available on the desk, requests may also be processed by Information Centre staff. • Where a request is able to be placed online, customers will be directed to the collection request shelves for collection within 20-30 minutes. • A text message will be automatically sent when the item is available, for customers who provided a mobile number and opted in during the registration process. • The collection requests desk is not easy to locate within the Information Centre, with many customers requiring further staff support to identify where to collect their items. OPEN ACCESS • There is a limited number of books in open access within the Information Centre. • The most visible books are part of the reference collection (dictionaries, phone books, etc.) and are not generally of great interest to visitors. • A shelf displaying new items, or items relating to the current exhibition is situated near the entrance, but it is not clearly signposted. It does however attract some interest from visitors passing by. • Catalogue computers are not easily found, leading to increased volumes of enquiries at the service desk. • The collection reference provided by a cataologue query is not easily understandable by visitors. • Wayfinding difficulties mean visitors struggled to locate collections in other rooms. CATALOGUES • Catalogue computers are hard to locate from a distance. • Catalogue computers located close to service desk discourages self-help. • Catalogue computers are not easy to use quickly - ie. standing up. COPY ORDERS • Copy orders can be placed online through the catalogue. • The document supply team can be called to provide assistance. • Customers will need to either login with their existing library card, or sign up for a copy order specific account. TROVE • Trove is used as an alternative source, where an item is not part of the SLV collection, or a more convenient location can provide a copy. • Trove enables SLV customers to locate items in external and out of state libraries. • Trove also enables customers from external libraries to locate items in the SLV collection. • Trove is used to identify items for inter- library loans. INTER-LIBRARY LOANS • Where items are not available within the SLV collection, staff can offer the inter-library loan service to customers. (See document supply for further information). This is a paid service, with visitors being asked to a pay a small fee in cash, or via a credit card. Collect Books and Reserves COLLECTION REQUESTS • Items for collection are stored in multiple locations at this desk. Some are openly accessible by visitors, while others (offsite, audio visual) are stored behind the service desk. • As items openly accessible are most visible, many visitors will look on these shelves, and be confused when they are not able to locate their requested item. • Where items are behind the service desk, this is not obvious to visitors, who cannot directly see where items are stored. • Items are stored on the collection shelves by surname. • Pamphlet folders on shelves will direct visitors elsewhere for material (Heritage Reading Room, staff at the collection point), or inform them that the item could not be found. These folders are not easily understood by visitors however, leading to many asking for staff support. • Items on shelf have paper slip with customer name, item details, and instructions on item use and return date. • Collecting visitors will regularly ask staff ‘where can I take this book?’, ‘can I borrow this?’, and ‘what should I do when I’ve finished with it’. • When visitors are finished with the item, they can return it to service staff, or place it on the nearby trolley, although this is not immediately obvious to visitors. • Items on collection shelves are cleared after 7 days. INTER-LIBRARY LOANS • Visitors pay for the inter-library loans service here, if paying by cash. They may also complete a credit card payment form at any service desk. Foyer Palmer Hall Genealogy/ Newspapers Assisted technology Collect books & ReservesPrint/copy room Arts Offsite room Staff room Cowen Gallery Information Centre COPY CENTRE mr tulk toilets information start here ask research assisted technology Staffed from 12pm male toilets female toilets staff only Keith Murdoch Gallery Lift area RESEARCH GUIDE 1. On shelf : RB 3874.8887.334 2. Request from onsite/ offsite storage 3. Call 86647009 search catalogue search catalogue search TROVE search Reftracker WATERrequest pdf Library member? or register online... RB 3874.8887.334 New books! request A 3874.8887.334 I don’t understand... ONLINE CHAT ONLINE CHAT CHAT request form Request forms reftracker online database online database Let’s talk more about what you need... I want a copy of this image to print for mum’s birthday! Sorry not a lending library. You can view it anywhere in the library for 7 days though. My book from NSW isn’t here. It says to go to the Heritage reading room... Catalogue computers? I need to register Do you know the answer to... I can answer that immediately! Can you help me find this item? What do you need to research? I can check our catalogue and TROVE for you... There’s a copy at another library. Would you like us to request it for you? You can lodge an online enquiry via the website and an expert can get back to you on that.I can request that for you... We have a research guide for that on the webiste! Yes. Can retrieve it for you... I can help! I’m an expert in that area! Here’s that research guide I’ve been working on! This is a complex enquiry... But I’m an expert on that too.. Not sure about this one... I’ll just ask for help.. Toilets? This is interesting... Redmond Barry reading room? It’s actually at a library nearby. Need directions? I’ll look that up for you online... Can I borrow books? TELL ME EVERYTHING! Library? Books? Trams? How do I go up? Where are the lifts? WELCOME! Can I help you? Let me look on Google for you! I don’t understand... My book isn’t here again... I’m finished with this. What now? I can do that search with you or I can show you how to search on your own... I’m trying to find a person but I don’t know where to start... I’m trying to find my uncle... You can also search in our collection Try this database. We also have newspapers, biographies and pictures... Some resources may cost you $$$ I’ll show you how it works! Can I take this home with me? Time to clear the expired books... 6pm Looking for reference material.. We’ve had this question before... onsite storage Collected at 9am, 12pm and 3pm by a collections officer Your item is ready to be collected! 1 hour Redmond Barry room? Why can’t I request this item mysefl? RB 3874.8887.334 search catalogue search TROVE A 3874.8887.334 Onsite storage COLLECTION REQUESTS • Requests are either printed automatically, delivered to staff, or phoned through. • Items requested online through the catalogue will automatically print two slips - one that stays with the item, and one that is left on the shelf. Other requests will require two slips to be manually created. • Staff will take details of item, locate it on the shelves, and leave a marker slip to assist in returning the item to the correct location when the customer is finished with it. • Retreived items will then be delivered to the Collection Request point in the Information Centre, or delivered to the Heritage Reading Room. Offsite storage COLLECTION REQUESTS • Requests can only be made in advance. • Deliveries are once daily, delivered overnight for the next business day. • Collection request forms are printed at storage, and then the item is collected from the shelves by staff. • Staff deliver the item to Melbourne, then it is delivered to the Collection Request point, or Heritage Reading Room following the usual channels. Redmond Barry Reading Room OPEN ACCESS • New books selections on display, but can only be seen when exiting the room. • New magazines and journals on display at the back of room, with no evident connection to journal room behind Redmon Barry. • Browsing the collection is very difficult - Dewey ranges are only visible close up at shelf level, and cannot be scanned when walking through the room. • To new visitors the library classifications lack a logical order - e.g. computing next to philosophy. • Mezzanine level collection is impossible to browse, without deliberately going upstairs and browsing shelf by shelf. • ‘Do not reshelve’ signs and lack of clear explaination on where to place used books cause visitors to question whether they are even allowed to access books. • Even with a catalogue reference, it is very hard for visitors to identify which room, and then which shelf the item is located in. • Folio books are located in a seperate sequence to other books. • Where visitors need support, the service point in this room is not staffed. Assistance in this room can only be reached by desk phones, or tracking down a staff member passing through, reshelving, or roaming. • On seeing an obvious service desk, visitors will stand by the desk, waiting for staff to ‘return’. Heritage Collection Reading Room COLLECTION REQUESTS • Accessed by being buzzed through a locked door by staff. • This room is almost exclusively for items requested in advance. The only exceptions are a collection of historic maps of Melbourne, that can be openly browsed. • To access requested items, visitors must sign into a paper log sheet, even if they are already registered, and explain the item they have requested. • Staff will match visitor’s description of their item, and check paperwork in manuscripts, rare books, or pictures folders. This can be difficult, where the customer’s description does not immediately hint at which collection it has been requested from. • Once visitor’s request slip is found in the correct folder, the slip is used by staff to locate the requested item in the room, and explain the usage conditions to the visitor. • When the visitor is finished with the item staff will check whether they will need it again, or are completely finished. They will also check the item’s condition to make sure no damage has occured. • Paperwork is filed by staff, which is then archived by collection staff at a later date. • Visitors can also place additional collection requests within this room. Staff will typically fill out the request form on the visitor’s behalf. • Request forms are collected by collection access staff 3 times per day at 9, 12, and 3. • Where an item request needs further mediation, appointments with heritage collection staff may be made at this point. COPY ORDERS • Catalogue computers are available in this room to enable copy orders to be placed by visitors, or assisted by staff. • The document supply team may be called in to assist, where required. • Where the item to be copied is already in the room, staff will assist the visitor in marking the desired pages or items. • The complexity of the heritage collection catalogue references, mean that the process of ordering copies may be time intensive. Eg. idenitfying the exact pages from a large multi folio collection. INTER-LIBRARY LOANS • Visitors use this room to view all items loaned from external libraries, to ensure they are properly and securely cared for. Collect Books and Reserves COLLECTION REQUESTS • Items for collection are stored in multiple locations at this desk. Some are openly accessible by visitors, while others (offsite, audio visual) are stored behind the service desk. • As items openly accessible are most visible, many visitors will look on these shelves, and be confused when they are not able to locate their requested item. • Where items are behind the service desk, this is not obvious to visitors, who cannot directly see where items are stored. • Items are stored on the collection shelves by surname. • Pamphlet folders on shelves will direct visitors elsewhere for material (Heritage Reading Room, staff at the collection point), or inform them that the item could not be found. These folders are not easily understood by visitors however, leading to many asking for staff support. • Items on shelf have paper slip with customer name, item details, and instructions on item use and return date. • Collecting visitors will regularly ask staff ‘where can I take this book?’, ‘can I borrow this?’, and ‘what should I do when I’ve finished with it’. • When visitors are finished with the item, they can return it to service staff, or place it on the nearby trolley, although this is not immediately obvious to visitors. • Items on collection shelves are cleared after 7 days. INTER-LIBRARY LOANS • Visitors pay for the inter-library loans service here, if paying by cash. They may also complete a credit card payment form at any service desk. Heritage storage COLLECTION REQUESTS • Rare printed, and Manuscripts collections retreived by heritage retreival officers. • Heritage retreivals officers are specially trained staff, due to the complexity of the storage and request systems, access restrictions, and handling requirements. • Will frequently request assistance from collections staff where item cannot be easily located. • Pictures collection retreived by Pictures staff. All Pictures request forms are delivered to Pictures staff prior to retreival. • Retreivals staff will look for access restrictions, and alert collection staff for further mediation with customer, as required. • Where an item has access restrictions, and appointment to view the item in the heritage offices may be made. • Location codes will differ greatly between heritage collections, with collection retreivals staff requiring a huge breadth of knowledge to learn and remember collection locations. Documen COP • Docum copy o for a P • Staff r follow Items supply • Item is specifi by doc need a will be • Copy i emaile burnt, INT • Docum items SLV, o • Items extern • On arr to the custom it is re • Where item f team policty staff t • If colle be pos docum Heritage Reading Room Dome Galleries Onsite storageOffsite storage Cowen Gallery Redmond Barry Reading Room D &Heritage storage room ballarat female toilets staff only Lift area information 231 Request forms collectionspoint ONSITE STORAGE RESTRICTED do not reshelve rare books TO: Document supply team FR: Library X TO: Library X FR: State Library of Victoria request request pictures manuscripts rare ill maps request form Things you should know ...Sign in here... New books! Redmond Barry reading room? Item requested is restricted. Is it ok to retrieve? These are out order. I can’t find the oo s on my own... Geography? Yes, we can arrange that! Hi what are you here for? To get that you will need to make an appointment with the heritage librarian... Let’s mark the pages you want copied... I will be coming back later so please hold onto it for me... You can order that online Help? Wow. These are great! I wish I knew these were here! B. RB 236.445.766 internet booking station Collected at 9am, 12pm and 3pm by a collections officer Your item is ready to be collected! Am I allowed to get this off the shelf? Hi I’m here for my viewing appointment... Where’s the information point up here? INT I’d like to order copies of... Would like to arrange for a customer to view a rare/valuable item? This is interesting... Things you should know ... Hi what are you here for? Would like to arrange for a customer to view a rare/valuable item? Yes, we can arrange that! newspapers Information Centre WORK SPACE • The Information Centre acts as a primary hub for visitors hoping to work within the library. As the first room with desks and computers, many visitors do not move beyond this room. • Activities within the Information Centre are diverse, but include solo and group study, tutoring, job interviews, office workers seeking a place to work outside of the office, and individuals running clubs and businesses from the library. • The collaborative nature of much of this activity means the Information Centre is the busiest, and noisest of the available work areas, which can lead serious visitors Arts Reading Room WORK SPACE • As one of the quietest spaces in the library, the Arts collection room is one of the most popular areas for serious workers. Desks will fill up early and remain full through to closing. IT SUPPORT • In addition to standard IT needs, the Arts collection also provides AV equipment which demands its own support. Visitors can ask Arts desk staff for support, when the desk is manned - otherwise they will enter the Information Centre seeking help. Experimedia IT SUPPORT • The Experimedia area provides gaming consoles, to attract a youth audience. These regularly fail and require staff support to reboot or reconnect controllers. PRINTING • Printing and copying services are outsourced to Bear Solutions, with all equipment and money handling handled by this third party. • Bear Solutions provide support staff during mornings, Monday to Saturday, with support provided by library staff at other times. • As many visitors do not understand the Bear Solutions relationship, they will choose to ask a passing library staff member for support, even when Bear staff are nearby. • The location and labelling of the copy centre causes confusion. It has poor DESKTOP COMPUTERS • The Information Centre provides free access to 15 minute computers, on a first-come, first served basis. • Available signage makes it hard to easily understand which computers are available for use, and which are provided for catalogue use. • While these computers are provided for quick use, many visitors will repeatedly log back into computers in 15 minutes blocks, staying for hours. This can cause friction between visitors at peak times. • Where computers are full, a queuing spot is provided (although it is not particularly visible) and its use is not IT SUPPORT • With the provision of WIFI, printing, and desktop computers, visitors expect a level of IT support. • Desk staff will be regularly asked for support in connecting devices to the WIFI, using provided software, and connecting their own devices to printing services. • Many visitors will also request charging cables and adaptors for their devices, including adaptors for foreign power points. • Desk staff will provide support where possible, and call rovers via the Vocera radio system to provide additional • Printing requires a library card, or dedicated print card, both of which must be charged with pre-paid credit prior to printing. This can only be done within the copy centre, meaning anyone wishing to print must come to this location first. • The charging machine does not provide change, and while this is labelled, it is frequently overlooked, leading to requests for refunds on credits to library staff - requests which can not be actioned. • Scans can only be saved to a USB stick, which are not provided by the library, and are not on sale within the Readings Bookshop. Availability to USB sticks is a Assisted technology Collect books & ReservesPrint/copy room Arts Reading Room Experimedia Information Centre Lift area online database online database start here ask research assisted technology male toilets COPY CENTRE WATER BEAR BIT TORRENT 67% Queue here printing provided by BEAR SOLUTIONS 2 MINS LEFT printNow what... Microsoft Word? Power adaptors? Which computers can I use? ers? Melbourne city library has MS OFFICE I need to PRINT, but the sign says COPY CENTRE? y= 2x+4z+27? Correct! How do I print?I can help too! This costs more than OFFICEWORKS Do you sell USBsticks? You’ll need a library, or print card. Can I print in colour? Do you have change for $50? Where do I put the money? The machine ate my money. Can I get a refund? Printing? How much? Scanners? Excel? Any more computers? I need more than 15 minutes! That guy has been on the computers all day! ROVER! Can I print from my laptop? I can help you with that! There are 1hr computers upstairs How is Melbourne? Let’s study the next chapter Hi, it’s Bob from the office.. So why do you want this job? Our club is now in session How I do I change the music? This WII doesn’t work! I’ll just log back in... My vision problems mean I need support with screen resolution, screen angle, and seat height... downloading 67% Our club is now in session Redmond Barry Reading Room WORK SPACE • The Redmond Barry room is the most popular space for regular and serious workers. Visitors will race when doors open to claim their favourite desk in this room, and once claimed many will tend to keep the desk for much of the day. • The quiet nature of the room means it is very popular with students, many of whom visit the library on a daily or weekly basis. • University students, who make up the bulk of visitors in this space, choose the library over their own university as it provides anonymous, quiet space away from distractions. They appreciate the La Trobe Reading Room WORK SPACE • The La Trobe room is the least used reading room and is typically the last to be filled during the day. At peak times however it will fill up with a combination of students studying, and other visitors looking for a quiet place to think and work. • Visitors either love this room or hate it. For some it is too austere and uncomfortable - for others it is their favourite room in the building to work, with the huge ceilings ‘allowing space for their thoughts’. • The La Trobe room is popular with writers, and many well known Victorian Arts Reading Room WORK SPACE • As one of the quietest spaces in the library, the Arts collection room is one of the most popular areas for serious workers. Desks will fill up early and remain full through to closing. IT SUPPORT • In addition to standard IT needs, the Arts collection also provides AV equipment which demands its own support. Visitors can ask Arts desk staff for support, when the desk is manned - otherwise they will enter the Information Centre seeking help. Experimedia IT SUPPORT • The Experimedia area provides gaming consoles, to attract a youth audience. These regularly fail and require staff support to reboot or reconnect controllers. WIFI • Virtually all visitors working in this room will do so while connected to the library WIFI network on their own devices, or will be connected to the library network directly on the provided desktop computers. • Internet use is incredibly varied, but most will at least some of the time use social networks, send emails, and casually browse general websites. • Many visitors will use the library internet to watch streaming videos, including sporting matches, television programmes, and educational videos. • While the majority of visitors use the PRINTING • A printer is available but somewhat hidden within the information point. • As charging print cards can only be done in the Information Centre, many visitors will need to make a trip downstairs before being able to use this machine. IT SUPPORT • Visitors needing support in this room will ask the service desk staff for support, if they can be found. • Service desk staff will attempt to provide support but will often rely on rovers for advanced support or during peak times. Rovers are called using the Vocera radio DESKTOP COMPUTERS • The Redmond Barry room provides a large number of very popular bookable 1 hour computers. • Computers must be booked using the computer booking terminal near the room entrance. • The booking system will anonymously allocate a computer, on a first come first served basis. When no computers are currently available, it will issue a booking for the next available computer - during peak times, this can lead to significant waits for visitors. • Computer bookings time-out unless they are claimed within 5 minutes of IT SUPPORT • Visitors needing support in this room are limited to roving staff, reshelvers, and any other staff passing through the space. • The information desk is not staffed, which causes visitor confusion. Visitors can often be seen waiting around the desk for returning staff, and then ultimately giving up and seeking help elsewhere. should be limited to visitors with a library card, and should only permit one booking per person at a time. • Once a computer has been booked, a paper slip is printed to provide proof of booking, and instruct the visitor on which machine they have been allocated. Many visitors struggle to match the printed computer code with the actual computer, and will wander the computer desks until they find the correct machine. • As with general WIFI use, desktop computer use is varied, with a huge range of appropriate, and sometimes inappropriate browsing behaviour. PRINTING • While a printer is available in the room, it is hidden to most visitors. • The library offers a web based print to any location service, which enables people working in this space to print directly to the local printer and avoid the need to go downstairs to collect their copies. Unfortunately this service is not well explained or understood and is not heavily used in this room. • As print cards can only be charged in the copy centre, many visitors will need to travel down to the copy centre before printing. Experimedia Dome Galleries La Trobe reference deskCowen Gallery Redmond Barry Reading Room La Trobe Reading Room Lift area information information study rooms female toilets staff only 231 LA TROBE READING ROOM DOME READING ROOM AUSTRALIANA BIT TORRENT 67% YOU TUBE lesson 1 E-LEARNINGFACEBOOK SCORE: 9999 ca t et fi in here... Computers? Where is the printer? Computer 19? internet booking station This WII doesn’t work! This isn’t fair! This happens every day! He keeps printing out booking slips! #@$$!! I don’t want that computer! DISGUSTING!! High score! I love this game! When will someone come to help me? Where do I collect my print outs? WIFI too slow when it’s busy so I bring my own internet... Here’s the book! Recharge print card? ROVER! I love this space. It’s such an inspirational place to write! SCORE: 9999 I love this space. It’s such an inspirational place to write! Palmer Hall Readings bookstore External Genealogy/ Newspapers Assisted technology Print/copy room Conference/seminar rooms online database online database mr tulk toilets ask research assisted technology victoria Staffed from 12pm Keith Murdoch Gallery TOUR pirANESI ROME postcards COPY CENTRE piranesiexhibition piranesiexhibition BEAR printing provided by BEAR SOLUTIONS school tour piranesi PUBLIC LIBRARY TRAINING WHAT’S ON TODAY ORATION LECTURE MASTERCLASSES TOUR CHILDRENs FESTIVAL VILLAGE ROADSHOW THEATRE CHESS INSIDE CAN WE JOIN THE LIBRARY? Bags in here please! DOME? I missed my school tour... Sorry you’ll have to just wait for them to finish... I’ll mind the bags... I loved the exhibition! Ok. I’ll take the kids through the library... Here’s a map and instructions... WOAH... @Lib_victoria: I love the library! And now on Radio National we have Sue from the State Library of Victoria talking about the wonferful Children’s Book Festival happening right now... @Bob_by: Right back at you! Shall we go see the exhibition? Sure! I’ve never actually been inside the library I wonder why this is here? We’re here for the conference Here’s the training room school tour public tour TOUR CHILDRENs FESTIVAL LIBRARY TOUR Collect books & ReservesPrint/copy room Arts Heritage Reading Room Cowen Gallery male toilets female toilets staff only picture books COPY CENTRE WATER 231 printing provided by BEAR SOLUTIONS TOUR SHUSH Young adults inky awards tonight La dolce vita! closed for conference room in use Lift area Bags in here please! internet booking station But where is Ned Kelly?! Parlez vous Francais? Can we use any other rooms? Loved the storytime but the changeroom is so poor I won’t be coming back! But how am I going to run my class? This is our family space... I might just duck out for a bit... TOUR But where is Ned Kelly?! Interacting with the physical space Accessing information Getting stuff done Community engagement
  14. 14. LESSON 3. MAP IT OUT, PUBLICLY 1. Tell personal stories 2. Sketch constantly 3. Share quickly and often
  15. 15. CONCEPT GENERATION
  16. 16. PROTOTYPING
  17. 17. USING THE LIBRARY AS A PROTOTYPE
  18. 18. Final journey map
  19. 19. DROP IN FEEDBACK SESSIONS
  20. 20. LESSON 4. PROTOTYPE BEFORE YOU’RE READY 1. Design through prototyping 2. Don’t try to figure it all out 3. Be brave 4. Welcome the skeptics
  21. 21. DOCUMENTING AND SHARING THE FUTURE STATE VISION
  22. 22. SO WHAT’S HAPPENED SINCE THEN?
  23. 23. STRATEGIC IMPACT
  24. 24. IMPACT ON STAFF
  25. 25. IMPACT ON OUR TEAM
  26. 26. Final journey mapAND THIS HAPPENED
  27. 27. THANK YOU Chris O’Brien
 Senior designer, Meld Studios 
 chris@meldstudios.com @chrisobrien

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