PRESENTERS:Melanie Gross & Joseph Sokola
JUAN PEDRO THOMAS (“PIRI”)• Born: September 30, 1928; Died: October 17, 2011• He was a writer and a poet• Born to a Puerto...
RELATIONSHIPS: FATHER-SON•   “Pops, I wondered, how come me and you is always on the outs? Is it something we don’t    kno...
RELATIONSHIPS FATHER-SON                     Discussion Questions•   How did Piri’s relationship with his father affect th...
RELATIONSHIPS: MOTHER-SON• “I joined her and we just laughed and laughed. I kissed her and went  into the back room feelin...
Pressure to be “Tough”• “This was a tough-looking block. That was good, that was cool; but my old  turf had been tough, to...
Pressure to be “Tough”                      Discussion Questions• What does the fact that Piri needed to establish a reput...
ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION•   “I sure missed 111th Street, where everybody acted, walked, and talked like me...
ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION•   “Every eyeball in the cafeteria was pointed our way. But the girl in front of ...
ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION             Discussion Questions• How do Piri’s insecurities in regards to the co...
SEXUALITY• “You know what going down is. You’ve heard about the acts put  on with the faggots.” (Piri, p. 55)• “All the gu...
SEXUALITY                   Discussion Questions• Considering the fact that gangs are most often viewed as a very  masculi...
REFERENCES• Thomas, Piri. Down These Mean Streets. Vintage Books: A  Division of Random House, Inc. 1997. 3-90. Print.• Wi...
Piri Thomas' Down These Mean Streets (Part 1)
Piri Thomas' Down These Mean Streets (Part 1)
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Piri Thomas' Down These Mean Streets (Part 1)

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DICUSSION LEADERS: Melanie Gross and Joseph Sokola

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Piri Thomas' Down These Mean Streets (Part 1)

  1. 1. PRESENTERS:Melanie Gross & Joseph Sokola
  2. 2. JUAN PEDRO THOMAS (“PIRI”)• Born: September 30, 1928; Died: October 17, 2011• He was a writer and a poet• Born to a Puerto Rican mother and a Cuban father• Grew up in Spanish Harlem (for the most part)• Became a gang member at a young age• Involved himself in drugs and crime and eventually went to prison for six years• During his six year sentence, he reflected on his parents teachings which led him to realize that he was not born a criminal and that he could change• After being released from prison, he decided to use his knowledge and experiences of prison and the streets to help at-risk youth avoid a life of crime• Down These Mean Streets became a best seller
  3. 3. RELATIONSHIPS: FATHER-SON• “Pops, I wondered, how come me and you is always on the outs? Is it something we don’t know nothing about? I wonder if its something I done, or something I am. Why do I feel left outta things with you; like Moms is both of you to me, like if you and me was just an accident around here? I dig when you holler at the other kids for doing something wrong. How come it sounds so different when you holler at me? Why does it sound harder and meaner? Maybe I’m wrong, Pops. I know we all get the same food and clothes, anything and everything; except there’s this feeling between you and me. Like it’s not the same for me. How come when we all play with you, I can’t really enjoy it like the rest? How come when we all get hit for something something wrong, I feel it the hardest? Maybe ‘cause I’m the biggest, huh? Or maybe it’s ‘cause I’m the darkest in this family. Pops, you ain’t like Herby’s father, are you? I mean you love us all the same, right?” (Piri, p. 22)• “Gee, Pops, you’re great, I thought, you’re the swellest, the bestest Pops in the whole world, even though you don’t understand us too good.” (Piri, p.12)• “I couldn’t expect him to be mushy over me all the time. Sure, it was all right for the other kids; they were small and they needed more kisses and stuff. But I was the oldest, the firstborn, and besides, I was hombre.” (p. 23)• “ ‘Son,’ Poppa called back, ‘you’re un hombre.’ I felt proud as hell.” (p.38)• “Poppa, I thought, I ain’t gonna cop out. I’m a fighter, too.” (p.31)
  4. 4. RELATIONSHIPS FATHER-SON Discussion Questions• How did Piri’s relationship with his father affect the way he viewed his role in society as a male, and, more specifically, as a Latino male?• Do you believe that these gender and cultural norms were intentionally taught to him by his father? Was it unintentional? Or, was it the streets that affected him most in regards to these norms?• “Poppa” was a very good example of how people tend to view masculinity, and, based on the reading, Piri wanted to be just like his father. He felt as though he constantly had to earn his Poppa’s approval, and therefore would do just about anything that he thought would make him proud. Do you believe this contributed to Piri ultimately choosing the harsh path he chose? Or do you believe that the society he grew up in would have led him down a bad path regardless?• Despite some of his mistakes, do you believe that overall Juan Tomás de la Cruz, Piri’s “Poppa”, was a good father? Why or why not? What were some of his good qualities? Bad qualities?• How did the relationship between Piri’s parents affect him?
  5. 5. RELATIONSHIPS: MOTHER-SON• “I joined her and we just laughed and laughed. I kissed her and went into the back room feeling her full-of-love words floating after me.” (Piri, p.18-19)• “She was holding her sides, my fat little Momma, tears rolling out of her eyes. Caramba, it was great to see Momma happy. I’d go through the rest of my life making like funnies if I was sure Momma would be happy.” (Piri, p. 19)• “Piri,” said Momma from the kitchen, “this is a Christian home. I don’t want no bad things said inside a house that belongs to God.” (Momma, p.20)• “Bendito, Piri, I raise this family in a Christian way. Not to fight. Christ says to turn the other cheek.” (Momma, p. 27) Discussion Question• Piri and his mother had a very strong relationship with each other; full of constant and unconditional love. How did the relationship that Piri have with his mother positively impact him?
  6. 6. Pressure to be “Tough”• “This was a tough-looking block. That was good, that was cool; but my old turf had been tough, too. I’m tough, a voice within said. I hope I’m tough enough. I am tough enough. I’ve got mucho corazon, I’m king wherever I go. I’m a killer to my heart. I not only can live, I will live, no punk out, no die out, walk bad; be down, cool breeze, smooth. My mind raced, and thoughts crashed against each other, trying to reassemble themselves into a pattern of rep.”
  7. 7. Pressure to be “Tough” Discussion Questions• What does the fact that Piri needed to establish a reputation in every neighborhood he was in say about the expectations of a teenage boy, specifically a Latino in New York City at the time?• What did being a member of “TNT’s” mean for Piri?
  8. 8. ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION• “I sure missed 111th Street, where everybody acted, walked, and talked like me. But on 114th Street, everything went all right for a little while. There were a few dirty looks from the spaghetti-an’-sauce cats, but no big sweat. Till that one day I was on my way home from school and almost had reached my stop when someone called: “Hey, you dirty fuckin’ spic.” (Piri, p.24)• I could have loved them if I didn’t hate them so fuckin’ much.” (Piri, p.26)• “Man, I ain’t scared, Poppa, but like there’s nothin’ but Italianos on this block and there’s no me’s like me except me an’ our family.” (Piri, p.28)• “Moving into a new block is a big jump for a Harlem kid. You’re torn up from your hard-won turf and brought into an ‘I don’t even know you’ block where every kid is some kind of enemy. Even when the block belongs to your own people, you are still an outsider who has to prove himself a down stud with heart.” (Piri, p. 21)• “In Harlem you always lived on the edge of losing rep. All it takes is a one-time loss of heart.” (Piri, p. 51)
  9. 9. ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION• “Every eyeball in the cafeteria was pointed our way. But the girl in front of me did’nt seem to notice it. I knew what it meant, and she looked at me and I knew she knew. I smiled and said, ‘Looks like everybody here knows you.’ She laughed and said, ‘Or you.’” (Piri, p.89)• “’Are you Spanish? I didn’t know. I mean, you don’t look like what I thought a Spaniard looks like.’‘I ain’t a Spaniard from Spain,’ I explained. ‘I’m a Puerto Rican from Harlem.’‘Oh- you talk English very well,’ she said.‘I told you I was born in Harlem. That’s why I ain’t got no Spanish accent.’” (Piri, p.83)
  10. 10. ETHNICITY, PREJUDICE, AND DISCRIMINATION Discussion Questions• How do Piri’s insecurities in regards to the color of his skin affect his relationships? How have they influenced his behavior?• How does his ethnic background and dark skin affect the way he is perceived by strangers?• Do you think Piri’s Latino background has made him more prone to join gangs as a way of protecting himself?
  11. 11. SEXUALITY• “You know what going down is. You’ve heard about the acts put on with the faggots.” (Piri, p. 55)• “All the guys felt like I did. Not one of them looked happy. So why were we making it up to the maricones’ pad? Cause we wanted to belong, and belonging meant doing whatever had to be done.” (Piri, p. 55)• “I like broads, I like muchachas, I like girls, I chanted inside me.” (Piri, p. 61)
  12. 12. SEXUALITY Discussion Questions• Considering the fact that gangs are most often viewed as a very masculine group of heterosexual men, did this scene surprise you? If so, why? If not, why not?• What does this say about the amount of pressure that an individual faces to fit in when growing up in this type of neighborhood?
  13. 13. REFERENCES• Thomas, Piri. Down These Mean Streets. Vintage Books: A Division of Random House, Inc. 1997. 3-90. Print.• Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piri_Thomas. 21 January, 2013. Internet.

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