D Major Clarinet Scale     Concert C Scale
Section IExplanations and Background Info
D Major ScaleThe scale you are trying to learn  is the D Major scale for the  clarinet. It is called D Majorbecause the fi...
Concert C Scale This scale, along with all other scales, hasanother name. It is also called the “Concert C”    scale. It i...
Putting the two together.So the scale is called both the D Major Scale and    the Concert C Scale. Somewhat confusing,    ...
“Transposing”   “Transposing” is kind of like “translating.” To  “transpose” music, you translate the notes from   one ins...
Why it’s useful to know.     Why didn’t instrument makers make all     instruments have the same note names?I have no idea...
Part IILooking at the Scale
The ScaleBoth of these images are the D Major scale you aretrying to learn. The first image only has one octave, and the s...
Watch and Listen
The NotesThis scale has all of the regular notes except for    two. All of the Cs and Fs in this scale will be            ...
F♯Here are the fingerings you can do to play F♯.           There are two ways to do this:           One is to hold your po...
C♯There are lots of ways to play this note, but theeasiest way is shown on the left.It’s similar to a regular C, with all ...
Practice Time!Now it’s time to practice.It’s going to be reallyfrustrating, but you justhave to keep trying overand over u...
Useful WebsitesIf you have trouble, here are some websites that                   might help you.• Lower Notes Fingering C...
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D major clarinet scale for sydney

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D major clarinet scale for sydney

  1. 1. D Major Clarinet Scale Concert C Scale
  2. 2. Section IExplanations and Background Info
  3. 3. D Major ScaleThe scale you are trying to learn is the D Major scale for the clarinet. It is called D Majorbecause the first note of it is a D on clarinet.
  4. 4. Concert C Scale This scale, along with all other scales, hasanother name. It is also called the “Concert C” scale. It is called the “Concert C” scale because for the piano, the first note of the scale is a C.
  5. 5. Putting the two together.So the scale is called both the D Major Scale and the Concert C Scale. Somewhat confusing, right? Well, this is because the piano is in a different key than the clarinet. So the notes on the piano have different names than the clarinet. For example, a D on the clarinet is the exact same note as a C on a piano.
  6. 6. “Transposing” “Transposing” is kind of like “translating.” To “transpose” music, you translate the notes from one instrument to another, or from one key to another. The clarinet is in the key of B♭ (flat), and the piano is in the key of C.You can always transpose piano music to clarinet music by going up 2 half steps in the scale. For example, if you are looking at a “Concert C” scale, in your head, think 2 half-steps up.“C ♯ , B♭.” So for a clarinet, and “concert C” is a “B♭”
  7. 7. Why it’s useful to know. Why didn’t instrument makers make all instruments have the same note names?I have no idea and it’s stupid and annoying and confusing. However, what’s important is that when you hear your teacher say “play your Concert C scale” you will know in your head that for clarinet, that scale is the “D Major Scale” and that for you, it starts on a D.
  8. 8. Part IILooking at the Scale
  9. 9. The ScaleBoth of these images are the D Major scale you aretrying to learn. The first image only has one octave, and the second has two. I wasn’t sure if you were suppose to learn one or two, so I included both.
  10. 10. Watch and Listen
  11. 11. The NotesThis scale has all of the regular notes except for two. All of the Cs and Fs in this scale will be sharp. Click again to see the sharp notes highlighted.This means that in this scale, F and C will require a different fingering than you are used to.
  12. 12. F♯Here are the fingerings you can do to play F♯. There are two ways to do this: One is to hold your pointer finger over the first hole on top only. I think you already know that one, so stick with it if you are comfortable with it. Another way, which people sometimes find to be easier for scales, is to hold down those bottom two side buttons, which are red on the image on the right, with the side of your fingers on your right hand, and cover the hole on the back with your thumb.
  13. 13. C♯There are lots of ways to play this note, but theeasiest way is shown on the left.It’s similar to a regular C, with all of your fingersdown over the holes, and your thumb over thehole in the back and the octave key (the long keyabove the thumb hole in the back), but you holddown one of those long, golf-club-shaped keys onthe left side with your pinky.If you look at the picture, you can see that it’s thelower key on the left-most side of that little cluster.
  14. 14. Practice Time!Now it’s time to practice.It’s going to be reallyfrustrating, but you justhave to keep trying overand over until you get it.Let me know if you needany more help. You canclick on the video to seethe little girl play if ithelps you. I know youcan do it! It just mighttake a while! All goodmusicians practice allthe time.
  15. 15. Useful WebsitesIf you have trouble, here are some websites that might help you.• Lower Notes Fingering Chart (easy-to-read)• Higher Notes Finger Chart (easy-to-read)• List of Scales• Video of Girl Playing Clarinet• Full Fingering Chart

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