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Content Design: Where IA and content strategy converge

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In a digital world that’s flooded with content, it’s important to adopt a grounded approach for content strategy and management. Content design is an essential place to begin your journey to content maturity. In this workshop, Meghan Casey clarifies the role of content design for websites and empowers you with a practical framework and useful tools gleaned from her book, The Content Strategy Toolkit.

Published in: Technology

Content Design: Where IA and content strategy converge

  1. 1. Content Design Where IA and content strategy converge @meghscase #ias18
  2. 2. Content Design
  3. 3. © 2015 Azzah B.A. Licensed under CC-BY
  4. 4. Components of content design
  5. 5. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business.
  6. 6. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need.
  7. 7. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users.
  8. 8. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content.
  9. 9. BUT, WAIT …
  10. 10. © 2013 Azzah B.A. Licensed under CC-BY
  11. 11. Are you aligned on intent?
  12. 12. Are you aligned on intent? We see an opportunity to …
  13. 13. Are you aligned on intent? We see an opportunity to … With content for …
  14. 14. Are you aligned on intent? We see an opportunity to … With content for … So that they can …
  15. 15. We see an opportunity to increase new and recurring orders with content for single, Paleo-minded athletes so that they can feel confident that Origin Meals will help them eat to perform.
  16. 16. We see an opportunity to increase new and recurring orders with content for single, Paleo-minded athletes so that they can feel confident that Origin Meals will help them eat to perform.
  17. 17. NOW WE’RE READY
  18. 18. Prioritization Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business.
  19. 19. Prioritization Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. NOT THIS www.artmajeur.com
  20. 20. Prioritization Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. THISNOT THIS www.artmajeur.com https://openclipart.org/detail/661/oil-filter
  21. 21. Tool: Prioritization Matrix
  22. 22. Tool: Prioritization Matrix Business value Userneed
  23. 23. Tool: Prioritization Matrix Focus - Content most important to the business and our users Business value Userneed
  24. 24. Tool: Prioritization Matrix Focus - Content most important to the business and our users Business value Userneed Drive - Content you may want to point users to once you’ve met their initial need
  25. 25. Tool: Prioritization Matrix Focus - Content most important to the business and our users Business value Userneed Drive - Content you may want to point users to once you’ve met their initial need Guide - Content important to your users and necessary for you to provide, but not beneficial to the business
  26. 26. Tool: Prioritization Matrix Focus - Content most important to the business and our users Business value Userneed Drive - Content you may want to point users to once you’ve met their initial need Guide - Content important to your users and necessary for you to provide, but not beneficial to the business Nope - Content that doesn’t fulfill a user need or business goal (even though sometimes you have to publish it)
  27. 27. Let’s try it!
  28. 28. Let’s try it! • Get into groups of 2 or 3 and choose a recorder whose screen you’ll gather around
  29. 29. Let’s try it! • Get into groups of 2 or 3 and choose a recorder whose screen you’ll gather around • The recorder should go to goo.gl/YLVBcW and make a copy of the document for your group to work from
  30. 30. Let’s try it! • Get into groups of 2 or 3 and choose a recorder whose screen you’ll gather around • The recorder should go to goo.gl/YLVBcW and make a copy of the document for your group to work from • Using the strategy statement for Origin Meals, discuss and color code the content items on the right side of the page according to the Prioritization Matrix
  31. 31. Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item
  32. 32. Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item Content item
  33. 33. We see an opportunity to increase new and recurring orders with content for single, Paleo-minded athletes so that they can feel confident that Origin Meals will help them eat to perform.
  34. 34. Discussion
  35. 35. Organization Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. cornellhomeimprovements.com
  36. 36. Tool: Topic Map • Use to document at a high-level the hierarchical structure of a website. • Often a helpful way to get initial alignment on the primary navigation and collect information from stakeholders. • Good for executive buy-in without getting too into the weeds. Home Problems We Solve How We Solve Them Get Proof Tech Specs Work with Us Buy Learn Consider Try Content: Common problems Industries served Responses to trends Content: Our approach Solutions and applications Products Technology lab Content: Case studies Testimonials Calculators Content: Data sheets and specs Application guides Deployment details Installation instructions Content: What to expect Sales process details Customer resources
  37. 37. Tool: Exploration Paths • Use to demonstrate the pathways you’d like to encourage users to take through your content. • Helps plan calls to action and related content. • Caveat: You can’t control what pathways users take, but you can help craft an experience that gets them what they need and helps you meet your goals. LOCATION SERVICE INDUSTRY EXPERTISE Prospect Consultant CONSULTANT BIO Location lens Industry lens Service lens LEGEND HOME
  38. 38. Tool: Relationship Model Degrees/ Areas of Study People Research & Projects Program Info Student & Faculty Bios Students Partners Recruiters Research & Project Details Partnership Opps Admissions & Application Info Recruitment Opps • Use to demonstrate relationships between content and other factors, such as audience, user journey, or sales funnel. • Use to show potential or likely ways users might flow through the content and where there are commonalities in that experience by audience, user journey, or sales funnel.
  39. 39. Tool: Detailed Sitemap Integrated Innovation Degrees Home Research and Projects Our Innovators Master of Integrated Innovation for Products & Services Work With UsWork With Us[Student Bios] Students Faculty Alumni Partners AboutFor Companies & Recruiters Explore degrees and apply > Explore degrees and apply Hire our students >Students Partner with us on research or a project >Research and Projects Spotlight on/Featured [person/project/program/event] - up to three >Relevant page Overview of all degrees Degree comparison Programs video Program overview - Description - Location - Skills and experience - Example courses - Rankings - Timeframe and program design - Career paths - Resources for students (e.g., VentureBridge) - Networking/job search resources - Info sessions >event deal pages - Tuition/costs/financial aid Who is a good fit - Typical candidates - Requirements Application process and deadlines > Apply Yourself app Faculty profiles >Bio pages Current student profiles >Bio pages Alumni profiles >Bio pages Projects and research >Detail pages Master of Science in Software Management Master of Science in Technology Ventures Admissions Overview of process and requirements > Degree pages > Apply Yourself app How to check your status How to update your application Information for re-applicants Info sessions >event deal pages Work With UsWork With Us[Topic Page] Work With UsWork With Us[Project Page] Detailed topic overview Project titles and teasers (all) >Project pages > Corporate partnerships Global Footer Contact information >Link to cmu.edu>Education Regulations in California For Current Students Intro/problem statement Description of work done Related assets (video, infographics, etc.) Results or potential impact Who worked on it >Bio/Partner pages, Faculty/research site Program indicator >Degree page Relevant stories >News stories Related projects >Project pages > Corporate partnerships Overview of types of research and projects - Student projects - Long-term research Sponsorship opportunities >Corporate Partnerships Topics - Topic title > Topic page* - Short overview of topic - Featured project titles and teasers (up to 3)>Project pages * Recommended topics for launch: Lifestyle, Industrial Safety, Health, Transportation, Personal Safety, Internet of Things, and Millenials. If a topic only has one product, link directly to project page. Overview of who innovates at III For each category: - Short description - 3 rotating featured >bio page >Landing page >Appropriate detail page for CTA Introduction to students Organized by degree program - Student teasers >bio pages >Degree page >Admissions Introduction to faculty Organized by degree:* - Faculty teasers >bio pages - Indication of directorship >Degree page *People could be listed under more than one category Work With UsWork With Us[Faculty Bios] Introductory messaging - Leading innovation - CMU internal partners (with links) >CMU partner sites - Directors >Bio pages - Rankings -History Overview of programs >Degree pages Contact Information Work With UsWork With Us[Alumni Bios] Introduction to alumni Organized by degree:* - alumni teasers >bio pages >Degree page Alumni CTAs - Connect on LinkedIn and Facebook - Donate - Submit your profile Organized by industry - Teasers >Partner bios > Corporate partnerships Work With UsWork With Us[Partner Bios] Introduction Ways to Partner or Engage Contact information/next step for each >Research and Projects >Students >Partners >Events Short introduction to resources >Students >Faculty Policies and Procedures >Graduate Student Handbook >Internship Guidelines CMU Resources >Graduate Education >The Hub >CMU Directory >Campus Maps >Computing Services >Academic Calendar >Schedule of Classes >Venture Bridge Pittsburgh Campus - Integrated Innovation Institute location - Administrative Offices and Classroom address - Student studio space address >Campus map Silicon Valley Campus - Introduction >Silicon Valley website Information for Admitted Students Our People Work With UsWork With Us[Admin/Staff Bios] News & Events Work With UsWork With Us[News Articles] Introduction Teasers organized by staff/faculty >Faculty bios Introduction News headlines and links - Internally produced stories - Media mentiones Upcoming events Work With UsWork With Us[Event Listings]
  40. 40. search and Projects Our Innovators Work With UsWork With Us[Student Bios] Students Faculty Alumni AboutFor Companies & Recruiters program/event] - up to three >Relevant page Work With UsWork With Us[Topic Page] Work With UsWork With Us[Project Page] Detailed topic overview Project titles and teasers (all) >Project pages > Corporate partnerships For Current Students Intro/problem statement Description of work done Related assets (video, infographics, etc.) Results or potential impact Who worked on it >Bio/Partner pages, Faculty/research site Program indicator >Degree page Relevant stories >News stories Related projects >Project pages > Corporate partnerships ew of types of research and projects ent projects term research orship opportunities orate Partnerships title > Topic page* overview of topic red project titles and teasers (up to ject pages ommended topics for launch: Lifestyle, ial Safety, Health, Transportation, al Safety, Internet of Things, and als. If a topic only has one product, link to project page. Overview of who innovates at III For each category: - Short description - 3 rotating featured >bio page >Landing page >Appropriate detail page for CTA Introduction to students Organized by degree program - Student teasers >bio pages >Degree page >Admissions Introduction to faculty Organized by degree:* - Faculty teasers >bio pages - Indication of directorship >Degree page *People could be listed under more than one category Work With UsWork With Us[Faculty Bios] Introductory messaging - Leading innovation - CMU internal partners (with links) >CMU partner sites - Directors >Bio pages - Rankings -History Overview of programs >Degree pages Contact Information Introduction to alumni Organized by degree:* - alumni teasers >bio pages >Degree page Alumni CTAs Introduction Ways to Partner or Engage Contact information/next step for each >Research and Projects >Students >Partners >Events Short introduction to resources >Students >Faculty Policies and Procedures >Graduate Student Handbook >Internship Guidelines CMU Resources >Graduate Education >The Hub >CMU Directory >Campus Maps >Computing Services >Academic Calendar >Schedule of Classes >Venture Bridge Pittsburgh Campus - Integrated Innovation Institute location - Administrative Offices and Classroom address - Student studio space address >Campus map Silicon Valley Campus - Introduction >Silicon Valley website Information for Admitted Students Our People Work With UsWork With Us[Admin/Staff Bios] News & Events Work With UsWork With Us[News Articles] Introduction Teasers organized by staff/faculty >Faculty bios Introduction News headlines and links - Internally produced stories - Media mentiones Upcoming events Work With UsWork With Us[Event Listings]
  41. 41. Let’s try it!
  42. 42. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups
  43. 43. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups • Go to the page titled Organization Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises
  44. 44. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups • Go to the page titled Organization Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises • Fill out the table one row at a time by documenting user actions and the content path they may take to get there
  45. 45. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups • Go to the page titled Organization Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises • Fill out the table one row at a time by documenting user actions and the content path they may take to get there • Hint 1 - You can use the same content item more than once
  46. 46. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups • Go to the page titled Organization Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises • Fill out the table one row at a time by documenting user actions and the content path they may take to get there • Hint 1 - You can use the same content item more than once • Hint 2 - You can include content that wasn’t on the list in the prioritization exercise
  47. 47. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups • Go to the page titled Organization Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises • Fill out the table one row at a time by documenting user actions and the content path they may take to get there • Hint 1 - You can use the same content item more than once • Hint 2 - You can include content that wasn’t on the list in the prioritization exercise • Hint 3 - Not all content need columns have to be filled
  48. 48. Example As an athlete who is researching Paleo meal plan options, I want to compare Origin Meals to other companies’ plans, so I can pick a company whose meals best match my values of sustainable food sources and humane treatment of animals. Food sourcing details (farms, stores, etc.) Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Meal plan options Place an order
  49. 49. Example
  50. 50. Example As an athlete who is researching Paleo meal plan options, I want to compare Origin Meals to other companies’ plans, so I can pick a company whose meals best match my values of sustainable food sources and humane treatment of animals.
  51. 51. Example
  52. 52. Example Place an order
  53. 53. Example Place an order
  54. 54. Example Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Place an order
  55. 55. Example Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Place an order
  56. 56. Example Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Place an orderFood sourcing details (farms, stores, etc.)
  57. 57. Example Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Place an orderFood sourcing details (farms, stores, etc.)
  58. 58. Example Comparison to other 
 companies’ products Place an orderFood sourcing details (farms, stores, etc.) Meal plan options
  59. 59. Discussion
  60. 60. Break
  61. 61. Components of content design
  62. 62. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business.
  63. 63. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need.
  64. 64. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users.
  65. 65. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content.
  66. 66. Presentation Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. Gift Shop Magazine
  67. 67. Key Concept: Content Wireframe • Sets the objectives of key page types. • Documents key content and high-level messages for repeated and, sometimes, unique pages/views — like the home page. • Shows the relative priority of content on the page/view to inform visual design and component design. • Serves as a governance document for conversations with stakeholders, editorial review, and content maintenance. 1 We’re in <Location> 2 3 4 5 Location landing page Objective: Introduce prospective clients in the <location> area to the services offered, industries served and give them confidence we can help them with their needs. 1 - Short introduction to the location that’s focused on how we help companies attract and retain clients for long-term engagements. 2 - Overview of the services offered through the location. Each service includes a straightforward headline and a one- to-two sentence client benefit-focused summary of the service. Headings are linked to the service detail pages. Only services available through the location should appear. 3 - Listing of the industries this location has specific expertise in. Each industry item includes a straightforward name like Healthcare and a one-sentence description of our expertise. Items are linked to the industry expertise pages. Only industries for which this location has expertise should appear. 4 - Up to two case study teasers for clients who do business with this location. Each teaser should contain the company name and logo and a short value-proposition- focused description of the results we helped them achieve. Only case studies for this location should appear. 5 - CTA to get in touch with the solutions manager to discuss their specific needs and determine whether it makes sense to partner.
  68. 68. 1 We’re in <Location> 2 3 4 5 Location landing page Objective: Introduce prospective clients in the <location> area to the services offered, industries served and give them confidence we can help them with their needs. 1 - Short introduction to the location that’s focused on how we help companies attract and retain clients for long-term engagements. 2 - Overview of the services offered through the location. Each service includes a straightforward headline and a one- to-two sentence client benefit-focused summary of the service. Headings are linked to the service detail pages. Only services available through the location should appear. 3 - Listing of the industries this location has specific expertise in. Each industry item includes a straightforward name like Healthcare and a one-sentence description of our expertise. Items are linked to the industry expertise pages. Only industries for which this location has expertise should appear. 4 - Up to two case study teasers for clients who do business with this location. Each teaser should contain the company name and logo and a short value-proposition- focused description of the results we helped them achieve. Only case studies for this location should appear. 5 - CTA to get in touch with the solutions manager to discuss their specific needs and determine whether it makes sense to partner.
  69. 69. 1 We’re in <Location> 2 3 4 5 Location landing page Objective: Introduce prospective clients in the <location> area to the services offered, industries served and give them confidence we can help them with their needs. 1 - Short introduction to the location that’s focused on how we help companies attract and retain clients for long-term engagements. 2 - Overview of the services offered through the location. Each service includes a straightforward headline and a one- to-two sentence client benefit-focused summary of the service. Headings are linked to the service detail pages. Only services available through the location should appear. 3 - Listing of the industries this location has specific expertise in. Each industry item includes a straightforward name like Healthcare and a one-sentence description of our expertise. Items are linked to the industry expertise pages. Only industries for which this location has expertise should appear. 4 - Up to two case study teasers for clients who do business with this location. Each teaser should contain the company name and logo and a short value-proposition- focused description of the results we helped them achieve. Only case studies for this location should appear. 5 - CTA to get in touch with the solutions manager to discuss their specific needs and determine whether it makes sense to partner.
  70. 70. 1 We’re in <Location> 2 3 4 5 Location landing page Objective: Introduce prospective clients in the <location> area to the services offered, industries served and give them confidence we can help them with their needs. 1 - Short introduction to the location that’s focused on how we help companies attract and retain clients for long-term engagements. 2 - Overview of the services offered through the location. Each service includes a straightforward headline and a one- to-two sentence client benefit-focused summary of the service. Headings are linked to the service detail pages. Only services available through the location should appear. 3 - Listing of the industries this location has specific expertise in. Each industry item includes a straightforward name like Healthcare and a one-sentence description of our expertise. Items are linked to the industry expertise pages. Only industries for which this location has expertise should appear. 4 - Up to two case study teasers for clients who do business with this location. Each teaser should contain the company name and logo and a short value-proposition- focused description of the results we helped them achieve. Only case studies for this location should appear. 5 - CTA to get in touch with the solutions manager to discuss their specific needs and determine whether it makes sense to partner.
  71. 71. 1 We’re in <Location> 2 3 4 5 Location landing page Objective: Introduce prospective clients in the <location> area to the services offered, industries served and give them confidence we can help them with their needs. 1 - Short introduction to the location that’s focused on how we help companies attract and retain clients for long-term engagements. 2 - Overview of the services offered through the location. Each service includes a straightforward headline and a one- to-two sentence client benefit-focused summary of the service. Headings are linked to the service detail pages. Only services available through the location should appear. 3 - Listing of the industries this location has specific expertise in. Each industry item includes a straightforward name like Healthcare and a one-sentence description of our expertise. Items are linked to the industry expertise pages. Only industries for which this location has expertise should appear. 4 - Up to two case study teasers for clients who do business with this location. Each teaser should contain the company name and logo and a short value-proposition- focused description of the results we helped them achieve. Only case studies for this location should appear. 5 - CTA to get in touch with the solutions manager to discuss their specific needs and determine whether it makes sense to partner.
  72. 72. Key concept: Taxonomy
  73. 73. Key concept: Taxonomy
  74. 74. Key concept: Taxonomy A taxonomy is the basis for assembling and relating content 
 …
  75. 75. Key concept: Taxonomy Automagically!
  76. 76. Taxonomy in practice Location Industry Service Chicago Health Care Content Strategy Barcelona Finance Web Design Helsinki Technology Writing Mexico City Retail User Experience Hong Kong Entertainment Development
  77. 77. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA
  78. 78. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA Location
  79. 79. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA Location
  80. 80. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA Location + Services
  81. 81. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA Location + Expertise
  82. 82. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA Location
  83. 83. Taxonomy in practice We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTALocation
  84. 84. Shutterstock
  85. 85. Structured content Shutterstock
  86. 86. Structured content example We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA • Each service is a content component in the CMS with the following elements: Content Strategy Content strategy is how you ensure you’re providing the right content, for the right people, at the right times, and for the right reasons. We can help you figure out what’s right. • The component is written and stored once, and published throughout the site based on the taxonomy. • When updates are needed, the content is updated everywhere it appears.
 • Using the same text throughout the content helps ensure messaging is consistent.
  87. 87. Structured content example We’re in Chicago Services Offered Industry Expertise Office Introduction Case Studies Contact Information and CTA • Each service is a content component in the CMS with the following elements: Content Strategy Content strategy is how you ensure you’re providing the right content, for the right people, at the right times, and for the right reasons. We can help you figure out what’s right. • The component is written and stored once, and published throughout the site based on the taxonomy. • When updates are needed, the content is updated everywhere it appears.
 • Using the same text throughout the content helps ensure messaging is consistent. Service name Service overview
  88. 88. Let’s try it!
  89. 89. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups.
  90. 90. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups. • Go to the page titled Presentation Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises.
  91. 91. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups. • Go to the page titled Presentation Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises. • Fill out the table to start thinking through how you’d present the content for a detail page about one of the Origin Meals meal plans.
  92. 92. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups. • Go to the page titled Presentation Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises. • Fill out the table to start thinking through how you’d present the content for a detail page about one of the Origin Meals meal plans. • Hint: You may have to just make some stuff up.
  93. 93. Discussion
  94. 94. Take it further!
  95. 95. Take it further! • Grab a sheet of paper.
  96. 96. Take it further! • Grab a sheet of paper. • Individually, using one side of the paper, sketch a desktop/laptop view and a smart phone view of how you think the content priorities should be presented on a page.
  97. 97. Take it further! • Grab a sheet of paper. • Individually, using one side of the paper, sketch a desktop/laptop view and a smart phone view of how you think the content priorities should be presented on a page. • Take about 7 minutes.
  98. 98. Take it further!
  99. 99. Take it further! • Share your sketches with your groups from before.
  100. 100. Take it further! • Share your sketches with your groups from before. • Together, create consolidated sketches for desktop/ laptop and mobile versions.
  101. 101. Take it further! • Share your sketches with your groups from before. • Together, create consolidated sketches for desktop/ laptop and mobile versions. • Take about 10 minutes total.
  102. 102. Take it further!
  103. 103. Take it further! • Share your consolidated sketches with your table.
  104. 104. Take it further! • Share your consolidated sketches with your table. • As a table, create consolidated sketches for desktop/ laptop and mobile versions.
  105. 105. Take it further! • Share your consolidated sketches with your table. • As a table, create consolidated sketches for desktop/ laptop and mobile versions. • Take about 10 minutes total.
  106. 106. Discussion
  107. 107. Specifications The detailed requirements necessary for producers/ writers to create the content. © IKEA
  108. 108. Tool: Message Framework • Specifies what you want your priority audiences to know and believe about you. • Articulates message points to prove what you want your audiences to know and believe. • Can define key concepts or themes, specifics on what content conveys what messages, and calls to action for proof points. • Helps writers stay on-message during writing. • Helps reviewers ensure content is on- message. Proof Value Statement First Impression What first impression do we want our audiences to have when they interact with our content? What do we want our audience to know or believe about the value we provide? What will demonstrate that what we want them to know or believe is true? General Hospital cares. I feel confident that General Hospital is the right place for me/my loved one/my patient. • General Hospital approach to care puts me/my patient/my loved one first. • General Hospital is a leader and innovator in advancing diagnostic and treatment techniques that affect me/my loved one/my patient. • Our doctors and care teams partners with patients’ primary physicians to take care of the sickest of the sick. • General Hospital helps make the stressful and unpredictable a little bit easier. • General Hospital cares for its community, inside and outside the hospital walls.
  109. 109. Tool: Message Framework • Specifies what you want your priority audiences to know and believe about you. • Articulates message points to prove what you want your audiences to know and believe. • Can define key concepts or themes, specifics on what content conveys what messages, and calls to action for proof points. • Helps writers stay on-message during writing. • Helps reviewers ensure content is on- message. Proof Value Statement First Impression What first impression do we want our audiences to have when they interact with our content? What do we want our audience to know or believe about the value we provide? What will demonstrate that what we want them to know or believe is true? General Hospital cares. I feel confident that General Hospital is the right place for me/my loved one/my patient. • General Hospital approach to care puts me/my patient/my loved one first. • General Hospital is a leader and innovator in advancing diagnostic and treatment techniques that affect me/my loved one/my patient. • Our doctors and care teams partners with patients’ primary physicians to take care of the sickest of the sick. • General Hospital helps make the stressful and unpredictable a little bit easier. • General Hospital cares for its community, inside and outside the hospital walls.
  110. 110. Tool: Message Framework • Specifies what you want your priority audiences to know and believe about you. • Articulates message points to prove what you want your audiences to know and believe. • Can define key concepts or themes, specifics on what content conveys what messages, and calls to action for proof points. • Helps writers stay on-message during writing. • Helps reviewers ensure content is on- message. Proof Value Statement First Impression What first impression do we want our audiences to have when they interact with our content? What do we want our audience to know or believe about the value we provide? What will demonstrate that what we want them to know or believe is true? General Hospital cares. I feel confident that General Hospital is the right place for me/my loved one/my patient. • General Hospital approach to care puts me/my patient/my loved one first. • General Hospital is a leader and innovator in advancing diagnostic and treatment techniques that affect me/my loved one/my patient. • Our doctors and care teams partners with patients’ primary physicians to take care of the sickest of the sick. • General Hospital helps make the stressful and unpredictable a little bit easier. • General Hospital cares for its community, inside and outside the hospital walls.
  111. 111. Tool: Message Framework • Specifies what you want your priority audiences to know and believe about you. • Articulates message points to prove what you want your audiences to know and believe. • Can define key concepts or themes, specifics on what content conveys what messages, and calls to action for proof points. • Helps writers stay on-message during writing. • Helps reviewers ensure content is on- message. Proof Value Statement First Impression What first impression do we want our audiences to have when they interact with our content? What do we want our audience to know or believe about the value we provide? What will demonstrate that what we want them to know or believe is true? General Hospital cares. I feel confident that General Hospital is the right place for me/my loved one/my patient. • General Hospital approach to care puts me/my patient/my loved one first. • General Hospital is a leader and innovator in advancing diagnostic and treatment techniques that affect me/my loved one/my patient. • Our doctors and care teams partners with patients’ primary physicians to take care of the sickest of the sick. • General Hospital helps make the stressful and unpredictable a little bit easier. • General Hospital cares for its community, inside and outside the hospital walls.
  112. 112. Tool: Page Tables • Extension of the content wireframe to provide more specific details for SMEs, stakeholders, and writers. • In addition to directional content and messaging, can include any items that are helpful to your writers, stakeholders and SMEs, publishers, etc. • Use to get alignment on page contents from stakeholders and SMEs before writing begins. • Gives writers the context they need to create on-strategy content. • Lets stakeholders let go of the words and focus on completeness, accuracy, and overarching messages. • Can be built to fit your process — from a Word document, to a tool like Gather Content, to right there in the CMS.
  113. 113. Tool: Page Tables • Extension of the content wireframe to provide more specific details for SMEs, stakeholders, and writers. • In addition to directional content and messaging, can include any items that are helpful to your writers, stakeholders and SMEs, publishers, etc. • Use to get alignment on page contents from stakeholders and SMEs before writing begins. • Gives writers the context they need to create on-strategy content. • Lets stakeholders let go of the words and focus on completeness, accuracy, and overarching messages. • Can be built to fit your process — from a Word document, to a tool like Gather Content, to right there in the CMS.
  114. 114. Tool: Page Tables • Extension of the content wireframe to provide more specific details for SMEs, stakeholders, and writers. • In addition to directional content and messaging, can include any items that are helpful to your writers, stakeholders and SMEs, publishers, etc. • Use to get alignment on page contents from stakeholders and SMEs before writing begins. • Gives writers the context they need to create on-strategy content. • Lets stakeholders let go of the words and focus on completeness, accuracy, and overarching messages. • Can be built to fit your process — from a Word document, to a tool like Gather Content, to right there in the CMS.
  115. 115. Tool: Page Tables • Extension of the content wireframe to provide more specific details for SMEs, stakeholders, and writers. • In addition to directional content and messaging, can include any items that are helpful to your writers, stakeholders and SMEs, publishers, etc. • Use to get alignment on page contents from stakeholders and SMEs before writing begins. • Gives writers the context they need to create on-strategy content. • Lets stakeholders let go of the words and focus on completeness, accuracy, and overarching messages. • Can be built to fit your process — from a Word document, to a tool like Gather Content, to right there in the CMS.
  116. 116. Tool: Page Tables • Extension of the content wireframe to provide more specific details for SMEs, stakeholders, and writers. • In addition to directional content and messaging, can include any items that are helpful to your writers, stakeholders and SMEs, publishers, etc. • Use to get alignment on page contents from stakeholders and SMEs before writing begins. • Gives writers the context they need to create on-strategy content. • Lets stakeholders let go of the words and focus on completeness, accuracy, and overarching messages. • Can be built to fit your process — from a Word document, to a tool like Gather Content, to right there in the CMS.
  117. 117. Let’s try it!
  118. 118. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups of 2 or 3
  119. 119. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups of 2 or 3 • Go to the page titled Specifications Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises
  120. 120. Let’s try it! • Get back into your groups of 2 or 3 • Go to the page titled Specifications Exercise in your copy of the workshop exercises • Fill out the table to create a messaging framework for Origin Meals that will guide content creators as they write content
  121. 121. Discussion
  122. 122. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content.
  123. 123. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content. Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business.
  124. 124. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content. Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need.
  125. 125. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content. Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users.
  126. 126. Components of content design • Prioritization: Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. • Organization: Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. • Presentation: Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. • Specifications: Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content. Defining what content to provide and how important it is to your users and your business. Grouping, labeling, and relating content so your users can find what they need. Developing frameworks and models for how your content is assembled to be meaningful to your users. Providing the detailed requirements necessary to create the content.
  127. 127. Things you could do now …
  128. 128. Things you could do now … • Prioritization: Conduct an assessment of a sample of your content or your client’s content — or all of it if you can — and apply the prioritization matrix. Use what you learn to make a case for further content design work.ur users and
  129. 129. Things you could do now … • Prioritization: Conduct an assessment of a sample of your content or your client’s content — or all of it if you can — and apply the prioritization matrix. Use what you learn to make a case for further content design work.ur users and • Organization: Identify the top 3 to 5 reasons users come to your site — or your client’s site — and document paths through your content you’d like to see users take. Then, review the content to ensure it supports the desired pathways.
  130. 130. Things you could do now … • Prioritization: Conduct an assessment of a sample of your content or your client’s content — or all of it if you can — and apply the prioritization matrix. Use what you learn to make a case for further content design work.ur users and • Organization: Identify the top 3 to 5 reasons users come to your site — or your client’s site — and document paths through your content you’d like to see users take. Then, review the content to ensure it supports the desired pathways. • Presentation: Pick priority content pages based on the prioritization and organization findings and hold a core model workshop with content owners, SMEs, the UX team, etc. Use the outcomes from the workshop to recommend changes to how content is currently presented.
  131. 131. Things you could do now … • Prioritization: Conduct an assessment of a sample of your content or your client’s content — or all of it if you can — and apply the prioritization matrix. Use what you learn to make a case for further content design work.ur users and • Organization: Identify the top 3 to 5 reasons users come to your site — or your client’s site — and document paths through your content you’d like to see users take. Then, review the content to ensure it supports the desired pathways. • Presentation: Pick priority content pages based on the prioritization and organization findings and hold a core model workshop with content owners, SMEs, the UX team, etc. Use the outcomes from the workshop to recommend changes to how content is currently presented. • Specifications: Work with the appropriate people to develop a messaging framework to help content creators create on-message, on-strategy content.
  132. 132. Most of what we talked about is in here. •Visit www.peachpit.com •Use code CASEY35 at check out •Works for paper and electronic versions
  133. 133. BEFORE YOU GO …
  134. 134. I am doing a great job. © 2011 Azzah B.A. Licensed under CC-BY

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