Interpretation of
Relaxed & Neutral Stance Position
Radiographs of the TaloTarsal Joint
Physician Benefit
• Documents objective radiographic evidence of
the talotarsal dislocation
• Identifies if there is a fle...
Patient Benefit
• Educates the patient on their deformity
• Assists the patient in determining the most
appropriate treatm...
Lateral View - Normal
• Articular facets are in
constant congruent
contact
• Forces are balanced on
the articular facets
•...
Lateral View - Normal
Sinus tarsi:
in “open” position
Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation
Partial to full obliteration
of the sinus tarsi.
Lateral View - Normal
Navicular Position:
Should overlap the dorsal half
of the cuboid.
Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation
Navicular has fallen into
the plantar half of the
cuboid.
Lateral View - Normal
Sustentaculum Tali:
should be dorsally positioned.
Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation
Sustentaculum tali
has dropped – plantar
position.
Lateral View - Normal
Cyma Line:
head of the talus should only
be slightly anterior to distal
aspect of the calcaneus.
Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation
Anteriorly Deviated Cyma Line:
head of the talus has dislocated
anteriorly.
More tha...
Lateral View - Normal
Talar Declination Angle:
< 21 degrees
Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation
Talar Declination Angle:
> 21 degrees
Anterior-Posterior View
Normal TaloTarsal Joint Alignment
• Talar Second Metatarsal
– Ideal is 3-6
– Acceptable up to 16
Anterior-Posterior View
TaloTarsal Joint Dislocation
• Talar Second Metatarsal
> 16
• When the bisection of
the talus is m...
For more information please visit:
www.HyProCureDoctors.com
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Radiographic Evidence of TaloTarsal Dislocation

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Talotarsal dislocation is a pathologic condition that leads to a path of destruction within the foot and ankle and up the musculoskeletal chain. This condition is often shrugged off as normal or nothing to worry about, but with every step taken pathologic forces are at work destroying our body.
This module shows objective radiographic parameters to accurately diagnose talotarsal dislocation deformity.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Radiographic Evidence of TaloTarsal Dislocation

  1. 1. Interpretation of Relaxed & Neutral Stance Position Radiographs of the TaloTarsal Joint
  2. 2. Physician Benefit • Documents objective radiographic evidence of the talotarsal dislocation • Identifies if there is a flexible/reducibility deformity • Rules out secondary deformities that may need to be addressed
  3. 3. Patient Benefit • Educates the patient on their deformity • Assists the patient in determining the most appropriate treatment course
  4. 4. Lateral View - Normal • Articular facets are in constant congruent contact • Forces are balanced on the articular facets • “Normal” amount of joint mechanism motion is available (no more, no less)
  5. 5. Lateral View - Normal Sinus tarsi: in “open” position
  6. 6. Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation Partial to full obliteration of the sinus tarsi.
  7. 7. Lateral View - Normal Navicular Position: Should overlap the dorsal half of the cuboid.
  8. 8. Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation Navicular has fallen into the plantar half of the cuboid.
  9. 9. Lateral View - Normal Sustentaculum Tali: should be dorsally positioned.
  10. 10. Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation Sustentaculum tali has dropped – plantar position.
  11. 11. Lateral View - Normal Cyma Line: head of the talus should only be slightly anterior to distal aspect of the calcaneus.
  12. 12. Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation Anteriorly Deviated Cyma Line: head of the talus has dislocated anteriorly. More than just a slightly anterior to the distal aspect of the calcaneus.
  13. 13. Lateral View - Normal Talar Declination Angle: < 21 degrees
  14. 14. Lateral View – TaloTarsal Dislocation Talar Declination Angle: > 21 degrees
  15. 15. Anterior-Posterior View Normal TaloTarsal Joint Alignment • Talar Second Metatarsal – Ideal is 3-6 – Acceptable up to 16
  16. 16. Anterior-Posterior View TaloTarsal Joint Dislocation • Talar Second Metatarsal > 16 • When the bisection of the talus is medial to the 1st metatarsal.
  17. 17. For more information please visit: www.HyProCureDoctors.com

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