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Blood Products and
Transfusions
By b conrad
When should you consider rbc
transfusion?
 Hb <80g/L
How do you treat iron
overload?
 Desferrioxamine or venesection
 Desferrioxamine mesilate is an iron chelating
compound
...
How often do you do obs whilst
giving a transfusion?
 Every ½ hour
1 unit will raise an Hb by how
much?
 1-1.5g/dL
For red cells and platelets
which is universal donor and
reciever?
 Platelets- O= universal reciever AB= universal donor
...
What is FFP used for?
 Clotting defects
 DIC
 Warfarin overdose
 Liver disease
 Note- ffp carries all the risks of bl...
Which product is used as
replacement in abdominal
paracentesis?
 Albumin
 Contains no coagulation factors
 Used in hypo...
List 6 early (<24h) reactions of
transfusion?
 Acute haemolytic reaction
 Anaphylaxis
 Bacterial contamination
 Febril...
What are the clinical features
of Acute haemolytic reaction?
 ABO incompatible -> intravascular haemolysis
 Fever
 Rigo...
How do you manage acute
haemolytic reaction?
 Stop transfusion
 Check identity and name on unit
 Tell hameatologist
 S...
List delayed (>24h)
complications of transfusion?
 Infections- viruses, hepatitis, hiv, bacteria, protozoa,
prions
 Iron...
What is Direct Coombs test
and Indirect Coombs test?
 Direct Coombs= test for autoimmune haemolytic
anaemia
 Indirect Co...
What type of red blood cells is
used for neonates?
 Fresh whole blood (<5 days post-collection)
What is Autologous donation?
 Patients donate their own blood prior to a major
surgery. Several sessions. They receive ir...
How many donors are needed
for one bag of platelets? Do
platelets need to be cross
matched?
 5x1010 platelets in 50-60ml
...
When does a patient possibly
need platelets?
 <50 x 109/L if bleeding or going for surgery
 <10 x 109/L if infection or ...
Who needs irradiated
products?
 Foetuses
 Premature neonates
 Stem cell transplant recipients
 Severely immunocompromi...
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Blood Transfusions quiz

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Blood Transfusions quiz

  1. 1. Blood Products and Transfusions By b conrad
  2. 2. When should you consider rbc transfusion?  Hb <80g/L
  3. 3. How do you treat iron overload?  Desferrioxamine or venesection  Desferrioxamine mesilate is an iron chelating compound  Can be given with the transfusion
  4. 4. How often do you do obs whilst giving a transfusion?  Every ½ hour
  5. 5. 1 unit will raise an Hb by how much?  1-1.5g/dL
  6. 6. For red cells and platelets which is universal donor and reciever?  Platelets- O= universal reciever AB= universal donor (Abs are in the plasma)  RBC- O= universal donor AB= universal reciever
  7. 7. What is FFP used for?  Clotting defects  DIC  Warfarin overdose  Liver disease  Note- ffp carries all the risks of blood transfusion
  8. 8. Which product is used as replacement in abdominal paracentesis?  Albumin  Contains no coagulation factors  Used in hypovolaemia- burns, shock, multiple organ failure.  Colloids are an alternative (dextrans, gelatin, hydroxyethyl starch)  Note- colloids have high molecular weight molecules that largely remain in the intravascular space, so create a greater oncotic pressure. (see colloids paper on desktop)
  9. 9. List 6 early (<24h) reactions of transfusion?  Acute haemolytic reaction  Anaphylaxis  Bacterial contamination  Febrile reactions  Fluid overload  Tranfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)
  10. 10. What are the clinical features of Acute haemolytic reaction?  ABO incompatible -> intravascular haemolysis  Fever  Rigors  Hameoglobinuria  Hypotension  Renal failure  Atypical antibodies from previous transfusions or pregnancy ->intra or extravascular haemolysis with anaemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, fever
  11. 11. How do you manage acute haemolytic reaction?  Stop transfusion  Check identity and name on unit  Tell hameatologist  Send unit + FBC, U&E, clotting, cultures and urine (hamoglobinuria)  Keep IV line open with 0.9% saline  Treat DIC
  12. 12. List delayed (>24h) complications of transfusion?  Infections- viruses, hepatitis, hiv, bacteria, protozoa, prions  Iron overload  Graft-versus-host disease  Post transfusion purpura
  13. 13. What is Direct Coombs test and Indirect Coombs test?  Direct Coombs= test for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia  Indirect Coombs= prenatal testing of pregnant women, and in testing blood prior to a blood transfusion. It detects antibodies against RBC’s that are present unbound in the patients’s serum.
  14. 14. What type of red blood cells is used for neonates?  Fresh whole blood (<5 days post-collection)
  15. 15. What is Autologous donation?  Patients donate their own blood prior to a major surgery. Several sessions. They receive iron. Donations are screened for infection in the usual way.
  16. 16. How many donors are needed for one bag of platelets? Do platelets need to be cross matched?  5x1010 platelets in 50-60ml  Shelf life 4-6 days  5 pooled units  Group ABO and Rh compatible but not cross matched
  17. 17. When does a patient possibly need platelets?  <50 x 109/L if bleeding or going for surgery  <10 x 109/L if infection or bleeding
  18. 18. Who needs irradiated products?  Foetuses  Premature neonates  Stem cell transplant recipients  Severely immunocompromised

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