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if	  a	  doctor	  predicts	  that	  his	  pa.ent	  will	  die	  presently,	  	                  it	  does	  not	  mean	  t...
if	  a	  doctor	  predicts	  that	  his	  pa.ent	  will	  die	  presently,	  	                  it	  does	  not	  mean	  t...
Schumpeter’s	  Gale	                   How	  social	  trends,	  consumer	  electronics,	  	    and	  the	  libera.on	  of	...
ques.ons?	  sms:	  919-­‐452-­‐8021	    @medicfurby	  
social	  +	  technical	  +	  data	  	  	  
community	  +	  connec.vity	  +	  content	  	  
technology	  +	  mobile	  tools	  +	  informa.on	  +	    community	  +	  user-­‐generated	  content	  +	       collabora.o...
where	  are	  you?	  
Acad	  Med	  2009;84(11):1479-­‐81	  
Given	  my	  status,	  what	  is	  the	  best	  outcome	  I	  can	    hope	  to	  achieve,	  and	  how	  do	  I	  get	  th...
pa.ent	  versus	  the	  ePa.ent	                                           •      Ac.ve	  •  Passive	  	                  ...
Elias	  Zerhouni,	  MD	                 “As	  opposed	  to	  the	                 doctor-­‐centric,	                 cura....
•  83%	  of	  U.S.	  adults	  own	  a	  cell	  phone.	  •  35%	  of	  U.S.	  adults	  own	  a	  smartphone	  and	     one-...
•  The	  highest	  level	  of	  mobile	  telephone	  use	  is	     among	  adolescents,	  younger	  adults,	     socioecon...
•  Fully	  half	  of	  U.S.	  adult	  cell	  phone	  owners	     (50%)	  now	  have	  apps	  on	  their	  phones.	  	  
Top	  10	  health	  searches	  from	  mobile	                    devices	  in	  2011	  1.	  Chlamydia	  2.	  Bipolar	  dis...
•  By	  the	  summer	  of	  2012,	  the	  number	  of	  iPhone	       apps	  for	  healthcare	  professionals	  jumped	   ...
 mHealth	  describes	  a	  broad	  range	  of	      telecommunica.ons	  and	  mul.media	      technologies	  within	  a	  ...
Top	  ten	  targets	  for	  mHealth	  •    Alzheimer’s:	  5	  million	  Americans.	  Wireless	  sensors	  can	  track	  th...
 Physicians	  were	  not	  responsible	  for	  the	      improvement.	  	  	   –  No	  addi.onal	  meds	   –  No	  signific...
•  The	  mechanism	  appears	  to	  be	  pa.ent	  self-­‐        awareness,	  accountability	     	     •  An	  adherence	...
Overview	  of	  Tracking	  •  69%	  of	  adults	  track	  a	  health	  indicator	  for	       themselves	  or	  others.	  ...
The	  Impact	  of	  Tracking	  •  46%	  of	  trackers	  say	  that	  this	  ac.vity	  has	       changed	  their	  overall...
The	  Impact	  of	  Tracking	  •  40%	  of	  trackers	  say	  it	  has	  led	  them	  to	  ask	  a	     doctor	  new	  que...
The	  Impact	  of	  Tracking	  •  34%	  of	  trackers	  say	  it	  has	  affected	  a	  decision	     about	  how	  to	  tr...
Tracking	  and	  Sharing	  •  34%	  of	  trackers	  share	  their	  data	  or	  notes	  with	       someone	  else.	  •  5...
  	  data	  
King,	  Gary.	  2011.	  	  Ensuring	  the	  Data	  Rich	  Future	  of	  the	  Social	  Sciences.	                      Sci...
Miller,	  Geoffrey.	  2012.	  	   The	  Smartphone	  Psychology	  Manifesto.	  Perspec.ves	  on	  Psychological	  Science.	...
        world	  healthcare	  data	  is	  expected	  	           to	  grow	  50x	  the	  current	  total	  	  
•    support	  research	  	  •    transform	  data	  into	  informa.on	  •    support	  self-­‐care	  •    support	  care	...
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare
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Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare

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This presentation was delivered for the Spring 2013 Health Informatics Seminar Series.

The Duke/UNC Joint Health Informatics Seminar Series is sponsored by the Duke Center for Health Informatics and UNC-Chapel Hill.

This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and include research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Schumpeter's Gale: How Social Trends, Consumer Electronics, and the Liberation of Data are Forcing Change in Healthcare

  1. 1. if  a  doctor  predicts  that  his  pa.ent  will  die  presently,     it  does  not  mean  that  he  desires  it.      
  2. 2. if  a  doctor  predicts  that  his  pa.ent  will  die  presently,     it  does  not  mean  that  he  desires  it.      
  3. 3. Schumpeter’s  Gale   How  social  trends,  consumer  electronics,     and  the  libera.on  of  data  are  forcing  change  in  healthcare  Robert  Furberg,  PhD,  MBA  Senior  Clinical  Informa.cist  RTI  Interna.onal  
  4. 4. ques.ons?  sms:  919-­‐452-­‐8021   @medicfurby  
  5. 5. social  +  technical  +  data      
  6. 6. community  +  connec.vity  +  content    
  7. 7. technology  +  mobile  tools  +  informa.on  +   community  +  user-­‐generated  content  +   collabora.on  +  social  interac.on  
  8. 8. where  are  you?  
  9. 9. Acad  Med  2009;84(11):1479-­‐81  
  10. 10. Given  my  status,  what  is  the  best  outcome  I  can   hope  to  achieve,  and  how  do  I  get  there?  
  11. 11. pa.ent  versus  the  ePa.ent   •  Ac.ve  •  Passive         •  Informa.on  seeking  •  Informa.on  is  given  to   them        •  Top  down  delivery  of   •  Partner  in  their  care   care        •  Paternalis.c  medicine   •  Par.cipatory  medicine  
  12. 12. Elias  Zerhouni,  MD   “As  opposed  to  the   doctor-­‐centric,   cura.ve  model  of   the  past,  the  future   is  going  to  be   pa.ent-­‐centric  and   proac.ve.”  
  13. 13. •  83%  of  U.S.  adults  own  a  cell  phone.  •  35%  of  U.S.  adults  own  a  smartphone  and   one-­‐quarter  of  them  use  their  phone  as  their   main  source  of  internet  access.  
  14. 14. •  The  highest  level  of  mobile  telephone  use  is   among  adolescents,  younger  adults,   socioeconomically  disadvantaged  popula.ons,   less  educated  young  adults,  and  people  who  rent   or  frequently  change  addresses.      (Franklin,  2003;  Faulkner,  2005;  Koivusilta  2007)    •  Further,  a  high  level  of  mobile  telephone  use  is   associated  with  lower  levels  of  self-­‐rated  health,   higher  BMI,  and  engaging  in  health-­‐ compromising  behaviors.        (Lajunen,  2007;  Koivusilta,  2005)  
  15. 15. •  Fully  half  of  U.S.  adult  cell  phone  owners   (50%)  now  have  apps  on  their  phones.    
  16. 16. Top  10  health  searches  from  mobile   devices  in  2011  1.  Chlamydia  2.  Bipolar  disorder  3.  Depression  4.  Smoking/quit  smoking  5.  Herpes  6.  Gout  7.  Scabies  8.  Mul.ple  Sclerosis  9.  Pregnancy  10.  Vitamin  A  
  17. 17. •  By  the  summer  of  2012,  the  number  of  iPhone   apps  for  healthcare  professionals  jumped   from  almost  4,000  today  to  nearly  6,000  apps.    •  In  August  2012  there  were  more  than  13,000   iPhone  health  apps  available  for  consumers.    
  18. 18.  mHealth  describes  a  broad  range  of   telecommunica.ons  and  mul.media   technologies  within  a  wireless  care  delivery   architecture.  
  19. 19. Top  ten  targets  for  mHealth  •  Alzheimer’s:  5  million  Americans.  Wireless  sensors  can  track  the  vital  signs  of  pa.ents  as   well  as  their  loca.on,  ac.vity,  and  balance.  •  Asthma:  20  million  Americans.  Wireless  can  track  the  respiratory  rate  and  peak  flow  so   pa.ents  can  use  inhalers  before  an  afack  occurs.  •  Breast  Cancer:  3  million  Americans.  Women  can  use  a  wireless  ultrasound  device  at  home   and  send  the  scan  to  the  doctor–won’t  have  to  go  in  for  a  mammogram.  •  Chronic  Obstruc5ve  Pulmonary  Disorder  (COPD):  10  million  Americans.  Wireless  can   monitor  FEV1,  air  quality  and  oximetry.  •  Depression:  19  million  Americans.  Wireless  can  monitor  medica.on  compliance,  ac.vity  and   communica.on.  •  Diabetes:  21  million  Americans.  Wireless  can  monitor  blood  glucose  and  hemoglobin.  •  Heart  Failure:  5  million  Americans.  Wireless  can  monitor  cardiac  pressures,  fluids,  weight   and  blood  pressure.  •  Hypertension:  74  million  Americans.  Wireless  can  con.nuously  monitor  blood  pressure  and   track  medica.on  compliance.  •  Obesity:  80  million  Americans.  Wireless  scales  can  track  weight  and  wireless  sensors  can   track  calories  in/out  and  ac.vity  levels.  •  Sleep  disorders:  15  million  Americans.  Wireless  sensors  can  monitor  each  of  the  phases  of   sleep  for  quality  of  rest,  detect  apnea  and  track  vital  signs.  
  20. 20.  Physicians  were  not  responsible  for  the   improvement.       –  No  addi.onal  meds   –  No  significant  changes  in  management    
  21. 21. •  The  mechanism  appears  to  be  pa.ent  self-­‐ awareness,  accountability     •  An  adherence  mechanism  is  important       •  Providing  a  monitor  is  not  enough    Hypertension.  2012  Jul;60(1):51-­‐7.    
  22. 22. Overview  of  Tracking  •  69%  of  adults  track  a  health  indicator  for   themselves  or  others.    •  21%  of  individuals  who  track  use  at  least  one   form  of  technology  such  as  apps  or  devices.  
  23. 23. The  Impact  of  Tracking  •  46%  of  trackers  say  that  this  ac.vity  has   changed  their  overall  approach  to  maintaining   their  health  or  the  health  of  someone  for   whom  they  provide  care.    
  24. 24. The  Impact  of  Tracking  •  40%  of  trackers  say  it  has  led  them  to  ask  a   doctor  new  ques.ons  or  to  get  a  second   opinion  from  another  doctor.  
  25. 25. The  Impact  of  Tracking  •  34%  of  trackers  say  it  has  affected  a  decision   about  how  to  treat  an  illness  or  condi.on.  
  26. 26. Tracking  and  Sharing  •  34%  of  trackers  share  their  data  or  notes  with   someone  else.  •  52%  share  with  a  health  professional.  •  22%  share  with  a  spouse/partner.    
  27. 27.    data  
  28. 28. King,  Gary.  2011.    Ensuring  the  Data  Rich  Future  of  the  Social  Sciences.   Science  331(11):719-­‐721.    
  29. 29. Miller,  Geoffrey.  2012.     The  Smartphone  Psychology  Manifesto.  Perspec.ves  on  Psychological  Science.  7(3): 221-­‐237.  
  30. 30.   world  healthcare  data  is  expected     to  grow  50x  the  current  total    
  31. 31. •  support  research    •  transform  data  into  informa.on  •  support  self-­‐care  •  support  care  providers  •  increase  awareness  •  pool  data  to  expand  the  ecosystem  

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