Sudan Media Report 2011 - Middle East

2,701 views

Published on

The report aims to analyze the media coverage of Sudan in the Middle East’s print media. Coverage was categorized into ‘Business’, ‘General’, ‘Politics’ and ‘Social’ classifications. A total of 20,134 articles were covered from newspapers and magazines throughout the year 2011.

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,701
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
753
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Sudan Media Report 2011 - Middle East

  1. 1. SUDAN MEDIA REPORTMiddle East - 2011
  2. 2. Objectives of the Report The report aims to analyze the  This report looks in detail at the media coverage of Sudan in the coverage metrics, as well as the Middle East’s print media. Coverage content, including prominence, was categorized into ‘Business’, tonality, coverage highlights, ‘General’, ‘Politics’ and ‘Social’ business coverage classifications, classifications. A total of 20,134 highlights, trends, tonality and articles were covered from countrys’ media sentiments in the newspapers and magazines GCC, Egyptian, Jordanian and throughout the year 2011. Lebanese media.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  3. 3. Call Us: +971 4 368-8444© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  4. 4. Executive SummaryThe Political Environment The past year has been a busy year for Sudan. More than six years after signing the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), South Sudan became independent on 9 July 2011. The Three Protocol Areas thus became part of the front line between the two countries, and were the scene of conflict prior to the separation. Meanwhile humanitarian access to conflict-affected areas was impeded following the departure of the UN Mission in Sudan, which had hitherto supported the implementation of the CPA. In June 2011, the Security Council adopted Resolution 1990, calling for the establishment of the UN Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA). The operation will monitor the border between north and south, and protect civilians and humanitarian workers. In August 2011, Sudan amended its Nationality Act, depriving individuals who acquire South Sudanese nationality of their Sudanese nationality. Meanwhile, the return of civilians to South Sudan continued with the support of the Governments of Sudan and South Sudan as well as the international community. In Darfur, the Doha Peace Agreement was signed in July 2011 by the Government and one of the rebel groups. The Government also announced a new Peace and Development Strategy for Darfur.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  5. 5. Executive SummaryThe Coverage The mention of Sudan in the GCC, Lebanese, Egyptian and Jordanian newspapers and magazines were carefully monitored  General coverage (347 clippings) featured a variety of positive, and analyzed in this report. Approximately 18K clippings were neutral and negative topics with varying volumes of coverage. analyzed, classified and tallied, reflecting Sudan’s media presence Economic factors such as droughts and inflations had an impact on in the Arab media in 2011. the general coverage with mentions talking on the public’s discontent or on food aid. Political mentions took a significant lead with 12,831 clippings,  While there was a respectable amount of positive general coverage energized primarily by the referendum and session but also with on various forums of events and participations, it pales in news on Sudan’s various conflict zones; Abyei, Darfur, Kordofan comparison to what it needs to be at to reach a more favorable and and Blue Nile State. This great volume of coverage with heavy positive overall sentiment. negative under-tones tilted the tonality of the overall coverage towards the negative.  Business mentions (1,617 clippings) were also a variety of positive and negative topics with varying volumes of coverage. It must be Social mentions were almost totally absent. While it is to be noted that there was a very decent volume of positive coverage with expected that social mentions find a harder time penetrating the various deals, projects, new productions and forums of foreign walls, having an average of less than ½ an article a month cooperation with other countries. However, with a decent amount of in all the monitored countries seems strikingly low. negative coverage, the positive coverage is dimmed.  Inflation, currency wars, business impact of political tensions, plummeting of the pound and shortening of the sugar supply, were the dominant negative business topics for the year.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  6. 6. Executive SummaryThe Breakdown Arabic was the favorite language of choice for Politics, Business and Social mentions, while General mentions had higher English coverage. Political mentions had the highest ratio of Arabic to English mentions with 5.5:1, while Social had a ratio of 4:1 and Business a ratio of 2.8:1. General mentions on the other hand scored a ratio of 0.9:1 (English:Arabic). This clearly states that political mentions are almost exclusively for the Arab audience. The UAE print media had the highest volume of coverage for Sudan in 2011 with 3,293 clippings, followed by Qatar with 2,685 and KSA with 1,696. Jordan had the least mentions of Sudan relative to the monitored countries in 2011. ‘News & Politics’ was the most common publication genre that featured mentions of Sudan, followed by ‘Business’, ‘Lifestyle & General Interest’ and then almost equally by ‘Travel & Tourism’, ‘Oil & Gas’ and ‘Communications’ publications. This order is in sync with the actual coverage’s breakdown in terms of Politics, Business and General classifications.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  7. 7. Executive SummaryThe Countries The UAE, Qatari and KSA media showed the highest interest in Sudan’s affairs with high volume neutral-sentiment coverage, featuring both the good and the bad. KSA, however scored the highest ratio of negative to positive topics in the year while the UAE scored the 2 nd highest negative to positive topics ratio. Despite that, the UAE media scored the 2 nd most favorable negative to positive volume of coverage ratio of 3.5:1. Qatar,  The Bahraini and Omani media scored comparable negative to positive on the other hand, scored the most favorable ratios in terms of topics topics’ ratios, but a deeper look at the tonality volume of coverage puts and volume of coverage with 4.16:1 and 1.27:1, respectively. Bahrain as the 2nd most favorable with 2.8:1, while Oman was the 2 nd The Egyptian and Jordanian media featured the least amount of least favorable with a ratio of 10.1:1 (Negative:Positive) volume of coverage for Sudan in 2011. The Egyptian media is likely excused for its coverage. This indicates a higher propensity for Bahrain to feature preoccupation with local affairs. Interestingly, the Jordanian media positive mentions of Sudan scored the 2nd most favorable negative to positive topics ratio with 4.4:1.  The Lebanese media was most interesting, with a volume of coverage . Kuwait had a relatively high volume of coverage that was well that exceeds Jordan and Egypt. Lebanon was the absolute least diversified, and stayed in the middle, relatively, in terms of the ratios. favorable to Sudan with a ratio of 15.6:1 (Negative:Positive) volume of Business relations with Kuwait, such as with Zain, keep the Kuwaiti coverage. That, along with sarcastic negative choice of coverage as in media interested in Sudanese affairs but coverage on this relationship the case of the article on Sudan’s railway running out of steam, there remains relatively low. seems to be a more defined negative sentiment from Lebanon relative to the other countries, which seemed primarily passive and in some cases positive.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  8. 8. Executive SummaryThe Sentiments The year 2011 is an exceptionally busy year. Analysis and gauging of media sentiment should be continuous. As the year began with the referendum, it created with it the theme of the year. The theme is political and economic troubles for the north. It seems evident that the GCC media, especially the UAE, Qatar, KSA and Kuwait media are receptive, with interest in affairs in Sudan, judging not only from the sheer volumes of coverage but also from the diversity of categories and topics. If Sudan is to boost more positive coverage, it will do well to utilize those media heavily. The Omani and Jordanian media seemed very passive, mentioning Sudan only when necessary, yet no negative sentiment is especially felt from those two countries. A boost in positive coverage might stimulate better relations and economic cooperation. The Lebanese media is one in need of a change of perception of Sudan, if it is to start having a more balanced sentiment. The Egyptian media, while also penetrating the common negative topics, yet featured a variety of positive topics, indicating a general positive sentiment.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  9. 9. Executive SummaryThe Conclusion Sudan is a country in dire need of a major regional shift in media image. Negative topics and coverage exceed positive in folds. The variety of negative topics on its own is likely to have a profound impact on its image in the region. This data should be utilized to focus on weak areas, such as politics. With various political operations attaining positive coverage, establishing network with journalists in the region and boosting forums of cooperation with regional countries, the positive image might surface again. It might be far-fetched to say, but the absence of social mentions might give clue to the negative overtones in the other categories. Sudan suffers from a very negative media image across the region with varying degrees. It needs to be engaged in various activities to combat that, and particularly in the media field.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  10. 10. Email: contact@mediastow.com© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  11. 11. Facets of CoverageMetrics & Penetrations
  12. 12. Facets of CoverageBusinessclippings tookthe lead,followed byGeneral andSocial. JulyandDecemberwere peakmonths.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  13. 13. Facets of CoverageMay and July2011witnessedtwo peaks forBusinessmentions, asthe gapbetweenBusiness andGeneral OTSwiden further.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  14. 14. Facets of CoverageApril, July,October andDecember2011 showan overallincrease innewspapercoveragesize forBusiness andGeneralmentions.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  15. 15. Facets of CoverageMay andAugust 2011were the peaksfor Businessmentions whileMay, July andSeptemberwere themagazinecoveragepeaks forGeneralmentions.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  16. 16. PenetrationsArabic wasthe popularchoice forlanguage,followed byEnglish.French camein 3rd place,particularlyfor Politicsmentions.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  17. 17. PenetrationsThe UAE, Qatarand Kuwait werethe most‘talkative’countries. TheUAE had asignificant leadin terms ofGeneralmentions, whileEgypt had thesmallest ratiosof non-politicalmentions ofSudan.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  18. 18. PenetrationsNews &Politics wasby far themostcommonpublicationgenre withmentions ofSudan in2011,followed byBusiness,Lifestyle &GeneralInterest.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  19. 19. Follow Us: @mediastow© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  20. 20. Content AnalysisTonality & Country Sentiment
  21. 21. Sentiment Analysis© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  22. 22. Sentiment Analysis© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  23. 23. Sentiment AnalysisBAHRAIN Business CoverageBahrain featured a total of 879 clippings with mentions of Sudan in 2011. The vastmajority of the coverage was classified as ‘Politics’, due primarily to thereferendum. Bahrain also penetrated 1 ‘Social’ clipping, 35 ‘General’ clippings and67 ‘Business’ clippings. In terms of topics, Bahrain had a ratio of 4.9:1 negative topositive, but in terms of volume of coverage, it scored a ratio of 2.8:1, negative topositive coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  24. 24. Sentiment AnalysisEGYPT Business CoverageEgypt featured a total of 951 clippings with mentions of Sudan throughout 2011. Common toall countries in 2011, the negative topics exceeded the positive ones. However, it must benoted that Egypt did not feature as many negative topics as the GCC countries have. Politicalmentions took complete dominance in terms of the negative topics, while positive mentionsvaried, but did not contain a unique positive topic, or a topic only penetrated in the Egyptianmedia. A prominent headline unique to the Egyptian media is on the suspension of the rail linkbetween Sudan and Egypt. Egypt scored a ratio of 5:1 negative to positive topics and a ratioof 4.25:1 negative to positive volume of coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  25. 25. Sentiment AnalysisJORDAN Business CoverageThe Jordan media produced the lowest results with only 432 clippings. The negativetopics featured the common negative topics across all countries; north and southtensions, clashes and conflicts in the various regions of Sudan and negative currencyupdates. However, unlike the case of Egypt where the suspension of the rail link projectwas a prominent headline, Jordan did not feature any unique negative or positive topics.Jordan scored a ratio of 4.4:1 negative to positive topics and a ratio of 6.2:1 negative topositive volume of coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  26. 26. Sentiment AnalysisKSA Business CoverageKSA media featured 1,696, ranking 4th. KSA featured a very large array of negative topics onSudan throughout 2011. The only truly unique topic is a positive one and its on the Bank of Sudanloosening restrictions on foreign exchange. Another topic that was only featured in a couple ofcountries including KSA was on talks on introducing full-fledged Sharia law. In addition to thecommon negative topics, KSA media featured other negative topics such as on various protestsin Khartoum and police reaction. The IMF report and the Mini Kaaba were also prominent topictopics in the KSA media. The KSA media scored a ratio of 6.5:1 negative to positive topics and aratio of 4.6:1 negative to positive volume of coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  27. 27. Sentiment AnalysisKUWAIT Business CoverageKuwait ranked 3rd with an impressive 1,951 clippings with mentions of Sudan throughout themonitored year. Interestingly unique topics in the Kuwait media were non political, numbering only2, the first is on Sudatel retreating in Q1 earnings and the other was on Shandi city being addedto the Arab Cities Organization in Kuwait. Another unique topic was on the Sudanese WomenAssociation holding a ceremony in Kuwait. Kuwait did not feature any unique negative topics, buthad a decent share. Kuwait scored a ratio of 4.7:1 negative to positive topics and a ratio of 4:1negative to positive volume of coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  28. 28. Sentiment AnalysisLEBANON Business CoverageThe Lebanese media featured a greater volume of negative topics relative to Egypt and Jordan. Theonly truly unique topic was on Sudan’s railway running out of steam. Lebanon featured a total of 1,064clippings, which earns interest, since it has featured greater volume of coverage, relative not only toEgypt and Jordan but also to Bahrain and Oman. Positive topics were all common, but in terms ofnegative topics, there seemed to be a trend whereby Western or UN statements, which are mainly notfavorable to the Sudanese government were always covered in the Lebanese media. The Lebanesemedia scored a ratio of 5:1 negative to positive topics and an astounding 15.6:1 negative to positivevolume of coverage, ranking 1st in terms of ratio of negative volume of coverage.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  29. 29. Sentiment AnalysisOMAN Business CoverageOman’s coverage consisted of 1,044 clippings in 2011. Oman did not feature anyunique or semi-unique topics in the year, rather picking up mainly on the mostprominent news on Sudan, which was primarily political and negative in nature.Positive topics also covered only the basic common topics across the board. Omanscored a ratio of 5.3:1 negative to positive topics and a ratio of 10.1:1 negative topositive volume of coverage displaying a very large ratio of negative coverage,ranking just after Lebanon.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  30. 30. Sentiment AnalysisQATAR Business CoverageQatar featured a total of 2,885 clippings, ranking 2nd relative to the monitored countries for the purpose of this report in theyear 2011. The Qatari media seemed to take on every news on Sudan that is mentioned anywhere. The overall tonality ofthe Qatari media can not be deduced solely on the ratio of positive to negative topics in the year, as Qatar penetrated alarge volume of both negative and positive, reflecting a rather neutral yet highly informative standpoint. This might be thecase for most of the countries, but with more evidence in the Qatari media than most. The only truly unique topic was onSudan’s participation in the Volleyball Communities League. Qatar also featured semi-unique messages (those sharedonly with one other country), such as Sudan’s Olympic team training in Bahrain and on Khartoum Music Festival. Qatarscored a ratio of 4.16:1 negative to positive topics and a ratio of 1.27:1 negative to positive volume of coverage displayingthe most favorable ratio of negative to positive coverage for Sudan in 2011.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  31. 31. Sentiment AnalysisUAE Business CoverageUAE ranked 1st in terms of volume of coverage with mentions of Sudan throughout 2011. Unique topics in the UAEmedia include the impact on Sudan’s economy due to the relations between USA and China. Other unique topicsincluded Sudan’s 35.5% GDP cut due to the loss of the South, on sugar supply plummeting and on property priceshiking in downtown Khartoum, as well as on property prices stabilizing. The UAE media displayed the same generaltheme as the Qatari media with its high volume neutral-stand coverage of Sudan. One can almost predict that if itweren’t for the referendum and the split of the south, the positive and negative ratios would be significantly altered.The UAE scored a ratio of 5.17:1 negative to positive topics and a ratio of 3.5:1 negative to positive volume ofcoverage, ranking 2nd in terms of favorable coverage ratio.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  32. 32. Call Us: +971 4 368-8444© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  33. 33. Methodology
  34. 34. MethodologyCoverage Scope/BreakdownThe coverage of mentions of Sudan were monitored in the year 2011 from GCC, Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon media.Those clippings were then sorted and filtered to include only relevant mentions of Sudan. The coverage was then furtherclassified into 4 main categories; Politics, Business, General and Social. All actual clippings are stored in a searchabledigital archive.Politics CoveragePolitics coverage was classified by exact highlight summary of the respective mention of ‘Sudan’ in context of the article.Those highlights were then sorted and grouped for cases where a general topic fits for the thousands of articles. This isdone for a number of considerations.The differences are often very subtle. Different angles but same overall topic. To list all variations will create data that ishard to analyze. Various updates within the same topic are also sorted for analysis purposes© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  35. 35. MethodologyThe groupings for the ‘Politics’ coverage were for:North and South ConflictReferendum News/UpdatesNorth and South SplitClashes in AbyeiClashes in DarfurConflict in Blue Nile StateConflict in KordofanDoha Peace Document© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  36. 36. MethodologyBusiness CoverageBusiness coverage was grouped into 4 categories and then further classified into exact highlight for each of thecategories.Macro-Business: All clippings pertaining to a macro-business nature in Sudan are grouped in this category. This includesprimarily industry and sector news or news with large-scale impact.Micro-Business. All clippings pertaining to a micro-business nature in Sudan are grouped in this category. This includescompany-specific and small-scale impact coverage.International. All clippings pertaining to an International business nature are grouped in this category. This includesimports, exports, multinational corporations, foreign investments and other business articles that involve other countries.Government. All clippings pertaining to government involvement in the economy or business of Sudan are grouped in thiscategory. This includes economic aid, government projects, deals and business or economic policies.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)
  37. 37. MethodologyGeneral & SocialGeneral and social coverage were analyzed by taking the root message the article is saying about Sudan from a generalor social context. Their coverage did not require the same type of grouping or sub-classification as political and businessmentions required.MetricsOnce the coverage was filtered, grouped and sorted, metrics were tallies. These metrics included the volume of coverage,OTS (Opportunities To See), NCS (Newspaper Coverage Size), MCS (Magazine Coverage Size), penetrations (language,country, genre and media type), as well as volume of coverage per tonality, topic or country.HighlightsThe highlights or content are broken down in a number of ways, depending on the objective of the analysis. Breakingdown the content by annual quarters and category, helps see the evolution of coverage with time. The breakdown of thecontent by country enables filtering out each country’s media sentiment and focus. The breakdown of the content bycategory enables one to see how each category did on its own.© Copyright 2012 Sudan Media Report – Middle East (2011)

×