New Media in education

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New Media in education

  1. 1. .s g d u .e New media in education: n ie Redefining the digital architecture r @ of classroom interaction ik e .zu Dr. Steven Zuiker n steven.zuiker@nie.edu.sg e Learning Sciences & Technologies e v t Festival Di Arts 2009 s Keynote Presentation 07 September 2009 1
  2. 2. .s g d u ie .e In times of change, learners inherit the beautifully equipped to@ nwith a world earth while the learned find themselves e r exists. deal u ik that no longer .z Reflections on the Human Condition e n Eric Hoffer e v s t 2
  3. 3. g New media in education: .s Redefining the digital architecture of classroom interaction d u t .e Perhaps unsurprisingly, interest in new media is actually not very c ie new at all. Singapore has been exploring the uncertain terms and r a n uses of innovative technologies for many years, and the education t @ system is no exception to this inquiry. In 2005, MOE launched an b s e r ambitious S$50M effort to research interactive digital media in ik a education that features seven Future Schools and fifteen u university-based research projects. Moreover, MOE’s research .z portfolio synergizes with work being done in other nations that use n new media in order to enhance the learning opportunities available v e to youth. Drawing on initiatives in Singapore and overseas, Dr. e Zuiker’s presentation will explore an underlying structure that cuts s t across these new media phenomena and consider its relevance to learning and teaching in Singapore classrooms as well as in informal settings beyond schools. 3
  4. 4. g underlying structures of new media in education u .s .e d new media aims to ... n ie r @ make learning an active dynamic process of personal e experience rather than a passive product of another’s ik experiences u motivate primarily through learners’ intrinsic interests .z rather than extrinsic rewards n embed or immerse learning in experiences within v e meaningful, relevant contexts te s 4
  5. 5. g aims of keynote address u .s .e d ie who am I? @ n one perspective on new media and its implications for e r learning and teaching in and out of Singapore schools u ik looking back .z looking around n looking forward e v e s t 5
  6. 6. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 6
  7. 7. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 7
  8. 8. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 8
  9. 9. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 9
  10. 10. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 10
  11. 11. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 11
  12. 12. .s g d u ie .e @ n looking back k e r u i n .z e v e s t 12
  13. 13. g looking back u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v e n te s images in this part of my presentation are credited to these two volumes 13
  14. 14. Singapore d u .s g ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 14
  15. 15. g technological frontiers - “Chinese Harbor” u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s 15
  16. 16. g technological frontiers - Straits Times u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s 16
  17. 17. g technological frontiers - trading stocks u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s 17
  18. 18. g technological frontiers - first railroad u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 18
  19. 19. g technological frontiers - first airport u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 19
  20. 20. g technological frontiers - first Cold Storage u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s 20
  21. 21. g technological frontiers - cooking u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 21
  22. 22. g technological frontiers - play u .s .e d n ie r@ ike .zu v en te s 22
  23. 23. g technological frontiers - schools & classrooms u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s 23
  24. 24. g technological frontiers - schools & classrooms u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s 24
  25. 25. g looking back - ratchet effect u .s d technological frontiers - schools & classrooms ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 25
  26. 26. g looking back - ratchet effect u .s .e d ie “The inventor of the system n best contributors @ learning deserves to be ranked among the e r the greatest to k iof [hu]mankind.” u -Josiah Bumstead and science if not .z benefactors v e n te 1841 s talking about the chalkboard 26
  27. 27. g technological frontiers - the transistor generation “Chances are that 7 out du .s e of ie .a n 10 of them will make future career in@business or industryike r depends on that a .z u n the transistor for growth.” e v e s t 27
  28. 28. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t www.computerhistory.org 28
  29. 29. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t www.computerhistory.org 29
  30. 30. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik .z 45nm Hi-k Xeon processors en November 2007 e v s t 30
  31. 31. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik .z Atom en November 2008 e v s t 31
  32. 32. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik .z FinFET en 2010+ e v s t http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/01/science/01trans.html 32
  33. 33. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 33
  34. 34. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 34
  35. 35. .s g d u ie .e @ n lookingeraround k u i n .z e v e s t 35
  36. 36. g looking around u .s .ed nie r@ ike .zu v en te s 36
  37. 37. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 37
  38. 38. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 38
  39. 39. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 39
  40. 40. g Gartner’s hype cycle of emerging technologies u .s .e d ie 2003 @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 40
  41. 41. g Gartner’s hype cycle of emerging technologies u .s .e d ie 2003 @ n 2004 e r u ik n .z e v e s t 41
  42. 42. g Gartner’s hype cycle of emerging technologies u .s .e d ie 2003 @ n 2004 e r u ik .z 2007 v en te s 42
  43. 43. g Gartner’s hype cycle of emerging technologies u .s .e d ie 2003 @ n 2004 e r u ik .z 2007 v en 2008 te s 43
  44. 44. g Gartner’s hype cycle of emerging technologies u .s .e d ie 2003 @ n 2004 e r u ik .z 2007 v en 2008 te 2009 s 44
  45. 45. g how new is new u .s .ed ie What does it mean to study n new media other than to study media that exist now? r@ recursive definition ik e new media not emerging so u much as media with uncertain .z terms and uses n new media studies quickly v e become history te s 45
  46. 46. g ongoing hype cycle(s) of emerging technologies u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s 46
  47. 47. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 47
  48. 48. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 48
  49. 49. s te v e n .z u ik e r @ n ie .e d u .s ongoing hype cycle(s) of emerging technologies g 49 http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/bionics/augmented-reality-in-a-contact-lens/0
  50. 50. .s g d u ie .e @ n lookingkeforward r u i n .z e v e s t 50
  51. 51. g looking forward u .s .ed nie r@ ike .zu v en te s 51
  52. 52. g looking forward u .s .e d ie “if infrastructure is n required for an r @ industrial economy, ike then we .zu could say that n cyberinfrastructure e v e is required for a s t knowledge economy.” 52
  53. 53. g (more) people have (more) computers u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s http://www.ida.gov.sg/Publications/20070822125451.aspx 53
  54. 54. g (more) people have internet access u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s http://www.ida.gov.sg/Publications/20070822125451.aspx 54
  55. 55. g more people have broadband u .s .e d n ie r@ ike .zu v en te s http://www.ida.gov.sg/Publications/20070822125451.aspx 55
  56. 56. g older people use computers & internet less u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s http://www.ida.gov.sg/Publications/20070822125451.aspx 56
  57. 57. g youth use more media to participate; elders “VoIP” u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s http://www.ida.gov.sg/Publications/20070822125451.aspx 57
  58. 58. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 58
  59. 59. g looking forward u .s .ed nie r@ ike .zu v en te s 59
  60. 60. g ubiquitous comp .s uting/networking new d u collaborative modes pen resources ie .e n o r @ ik e u .zeb culture v e n participatory w ease of deploying te at scale s market niches across the “long tail” 60
  61. 61. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.bytelevel.com/map/ccTLD.html 61
  62. 62. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.bytelevel.com/map/ccTLD.html 62
  63. 63. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.bytelevel.com/map/ccTLD.html 63
  64. 64. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.bytelevel.com/map/ccTLD.html 64
  65. 65. .s g d u ie .e n twitter r @ wikipedia ik e email u facebook .z blogs v en te s 65
  66. 66. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 66
  67. 67. .s g d u ! ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t Nexus World - Quest Atlantis designed by Asmalina Saleh, Steve Zuiker, 3 QA interns, and Enkar 67
  68. 68. .s g d u .e New ie r @ n ik e v e Media n .z u te s 68
  69. 69. g Learning Participatory u .s .e d n ie r@ ike .zu v en te s 69
  70. 70. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 70
  71. 71. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 71
  72. 72. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .ed n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s digitallearning.macfound.org 72
  73. 73. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 73
  74. 74. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 74
  75. 75. .s g u technological transformation .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s www.amazon.com 75
  76. 76. experiential transformation .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.themorningnews.org/archives/galleries/the_laptop_club/ 76
  77. 77. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 77
  78. 78. transmedia experiences .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t www.amazon.com 78
  79. 79. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 79
  80. 80. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 80
  81. 81. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/04/us/politics/04memo.html?ref=politics 81
  82. 82. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://gigaom.com/2008/10/13/confirmed-obama-is-campaigning-on-xbox-360/ 82
  83. 83. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .e d ie nthe Unexpected Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Digital Young, Innovation,@ r e Online: and Civick i Life Can Engage Youth   .z u n Learning How Digital Media e v e s t http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/dmal/-/1 83
  84. 84. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s Learning Race and Ethnicity:d ie .e n Youth and Digital Media @ r and Learning Connecting Youth, e ik The Ecology of Games: u Youth, and Credibility Games, n .z e Digital Media, e v s t http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/dmal/-/1 84
  85. 85. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v e n te s the goodplay project harvard university 85
  86. 86. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .e d n ie @ disciplined synthesizing e r ik creating .z respectful u v e n ethical te s 86
  87. 87. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v en te s 87
  88. 88. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s disciplines .e d subject n ie @ way of thinking about or r “seeing” the world matter ike u observe, create, define, .z revise e n facts, formulas, figures v (professionals and te memorize, accumulate students are not the same) s (Gardner, 2006) 88
  89. 89. g MacArthur Foundation | Digital Media & Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u v e n te s the games school new york city 89
  90. 90. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r enable students to take on the ik identities and behaviors of u uses the structure explorers, mathematicians, .z of games writers, and historians, to create en evolutionary biologists as they v powerful educational e work through a dynamic, challenge- t tools s based curriculum with content- rich questing to learn at its core 90
  91. 91. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d ie • 2007 class project for Anthropology course @ n r • thinking like an anthropologist e (disciplined mind) u ik • learning by doing a video .z ethnography e n • more available here: http:// e v mediatedcultures.net/ t youtube.htm s http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/ 91
  92. 92. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 92
  93. 93. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 93
  94. 94. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 94
  95. 95. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s http://docs.google.com/ 95
  96. 96. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 96
  97. 97. g Example of Participatory Learning u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s 97
  98. 98. g A Vision of Students Today u .s .e d n ie r@ ike .zu v en te s http://youtube.com/watch?v=dGCJ46vyR9o 98
  99. 99. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z ? e v e s t 99
  100. 100. g learning by doing u .s .e d n ie “Tell me and I will forget. Show me, @ and I may remember. Involve me, and I will understand” e r Confucious (450 B.C.E.) u ik “we learn by doing only after reflecting on what we have done” .z John Dewey (1929 C.E.) v e n “learning comes from and with the doing” te James Gee (2008 C.E.) s 100
  101. 101. g learning by doing u .s .e d n ie Pedagogy Driving a Car Speaking a Lanuage r @ drill & practice changing gears vocabulary, verb forms ik e expository reading “rules of the road” lecture on verb functions u gradually switch controls from scene where student increasingly apprenticeship .z master shapes interaction n demo, copy, and generalize signal by example multiple example situations e maneuver e v guided coaching running commentary while driving conversation and feedback s t by doing just driving (start simple) immersion adapted from Helen Pain, http://www.inf.ed.ac.uk/teaching/courses/aile/ 101
  102. 102. g learning by doing u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e u erosion .z i-'rO-zh&n e n the recession of surfaces by repeated localized e v mechanical trauma as, for example, by suspended s t abrasive particles within a moving fluid. 102
  103. 103. g learning by doing u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e u erosion .z i-'rO-zh&n e n the recession of surfaces by repeated localized e v mechanical trauma as, for example, by suspended s t abrasive particles within a moving fluid. 103
  104. 104. g learning by doing u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e u erosion .z i-'rO-zh&n e n the recession of surfaces by repeated localized e v mechanical trauma as, for example, by suspended s t abrasive particles within a moving fluid. 104
  105. 105. g learning by doing u .s .e d nie r@ ike .zu v en te s 105
  106. 106. g quest atlantis u .s .ed nie r@ ike .zu v en te s questatlantis.org 106
  107. 107. g quest atlantis is a digital play space u .s .e d n ie r @ ike .zu v en te s questatlantis.org 107
  108. 108. g quest atlantis is a community u .s .e d n ie r@ ike .zu v en te s questatlantis.org 108
  109. 109. g quest atlantis is a community u .s .e d ie  Meetings: collaborate via online and face-to-face n meetings @  Members: share and learn about other QA teachers e r  Forums: participate in online discussions ik  Circles: collaborate via private online meetings u Resources: download unit plans and other teacher .z  support documents v e n te s questatlantis.org 109
  110. 110. g quest atlantis features learning by doing u .s .e d n ie r @ ik e .zu v en te s 110
  111. 111. .s g d u ie .e *WANTED* n field investigator r @ •help Ranger Bartle with an e investigation: why are the fish ik dying? .zu •interview park stakeholders and n report findings v e •formulate and test a hypothesis te •collect and analyze water s samples •submit a proposal to resolve the 111
  112. 112. .s g d u ie .e @ n Taiga e r ik National .zu Park v e n te s 112
  113. 113. .s g d u ie .e @ n Sport e r ik Fishing .zu Outfit v e n te s 113
  114. 114. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r ik Indigenous .zu community v e n te s 114
  115. 115. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r ik Logging .zu Company v e n te s 115
  116. 116. .s g d u ie .e @ n e rlaboratory credential ik *NEEDED* .zu n •earn certification from lab v e technician te •water quality indicators (e.g., pH) s •relate to erosion & eutrophication •evaluate hypothesis 116
  117. 117. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 117
  118. 118. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 118
  119. 119. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 119
  120. 120. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 120
  121. 121. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 121
  122. 122. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 3.1 te s pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 122
  123. 123. .s g d u ie .e n A B C r@ Turbidity 6 27 22 ik e Dissolved Oxygen 5.5 4.5 4.0 u Temperature 17.5 22.5 22.0 n .z Nitrates 3.15 0.96 2.08 v e Phosphates 3.6 1.7 e 3.1 s t pH 6.6 7.0 7.3 123
  124. 124. g subject matter versus discipline disciplines u .s subject .e d ie way of thinking about or n “seeing” the world matter r @ ik e observe, create, define, revise .z u facts, formulas, figures n (professionals and v e memorize, accumulate students are not the same) te s (Gardner, 2006) 124
  125. 125. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t 125
  126. 126. .s g u Some Nobel Laureates in Medicine .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u n 1957 1967 1977 1987 1997 2007 e v e s t 126
  127. 127. .s g u Some Nobel Laureates in Literature .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u n 1957 1967 1977 1987 1997 2007 e v e s t 127
  128. 128. .s g u Some Nobel Laureates in Chemistry .e d n ie r @ ik e .z u n 1957 1967 1977 1987 1997 2007 e v e s t 128
  129. 129. Literature .s .e d g u n ie Medicine .z u ik e r @ v e n Chemistry s te 129
  130. 130. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t Spore http://www.ea.com.sg/spore 130
  131. 131. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/322/5901/531b 131
  132. 132. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z v e Game Design Team: e Curriculum Design Team: Chee Yam San t Judy Lee Ahmed Hazyl Hilmy Steve Zuiker s Liu Qiang Kate Anderson Steve Zuiker Chee Yam San 132
  133. 133. .s g d u ie .e @ n e r u ik n .z e v e s t Escape from Centauri 7 133
  134. 134. .s g d u ie .e Dialogic Unit Structure @ n e r ik Dialogic Activity Cycle .z u e n Small Group Whole Class v Game Play e Discussion Debriefing s t 134
  135. 135. g underlying structures of new media in education u .s .e d new media aims to ... n ie r @ make learning an active dynamic process of personal e experience rather than a passive product of another’s ik experiences u motivate primarily through learners’ intrinsic interests .z rather than extrinsic rewards n embed or immerse learning in experiences within v e meaningful, relevant contexts te s 135
  136. 136. .s g d u ie .e @ nThank you e r u ik n .z e v e s t 136
  137. 137. .s g d u .e questions | answers | comments n ie r @ ik e z u .steven.zuiker@nie.edu.sg v en te s 137
  138. 138. .s g d u ie .e @ n r http://twitter.com/szuiker ik e .z u v en te s 138

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