MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint

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MediaFilmExchange.co.uk Powerpoint

  1. 1. MEDIA LANGUAGE EDITING
  2. 2. EDITING • After the completion of filming the final stage is editing, the selection and piecing together of shots to form the completed film. A range of choices can be made when editing a film. • Continuity editing • Shot/Reverse Shot editing • Eye – line match • Cross cutting • The 180 Degree Rule • Discontinuity editing – Montage and Freeze Frame • Transitions
  3. 3. EDITING • Continuity editing: this form of editing is mostly employed in Hollywood films. Action flows smoothly from one frame to another and the audience simply follows the dialogue. • Shot/reverse shot: this form of shot is deployed during conversations. The shots themselves are often over the shoulder shots in which we see part of the back of one person’s head and shoulder and the front of the other person talking to them.
  4. 4. EDITING • Eye – line match: any interaction between characters require an eye-line match. The direction of a character’s gaze needs to be matched to the position of the object they are looking at. • Cross – cutting: this is commonly used for building suspense. It consists of editing together shots of events in different locations which are expected eventually to coincide with each other. • 180 degree rule - handout
  5. 5. EDITING • Discontinuity editing: in this form of editing there is no smooth flow to the shots edited together; there is a disruption from one shot to the next. Meaning is produced by the way the shots are linked and interact with each together.
  6. 6. TRANSITIONS • If scenes were edited straight up against each other, then the narrative could be confusing. The usual convention is to use transitions. • The usual convention is to use a fade to black to end a scene & a fade from black to end a scene. • Dissolves and wipes are usually used to indicate the passing of time.
  7. 7. TRANSITIONS • If scenes were edited straight up against each other, then the narrative could be confusing. The usual convention is to use transitions. • The usual convention is to use a fade to black to end a scene & a fade from black to end a scene. • Dissolves and wipes are usually used to indicate the passing of time.

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