Matthew Griffin Design Tools

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Matthew Griffin Design Tools

  1. 1. Alot of Plastic by Cymonscrewless heart gears by emmettDigital Bolex Xmas Ornament by digitalbolexGolf in Miniature by Beekeeper Sphinx of Hatshepsut by OZAR Barrel Of Octopi by yeoldebrianOctopod Underwater SalvageVehicleby Sean CharlesworthFriday, April 26, 13
  2. 2. Fenway Park by Objet’s Boston TeamAutomatic Transmission by emmettIndustrial Habitat by Micah GanskeHead of a Horse of Selene by CosmoWenmanFriday, April 26, 13
  3. 3. Nelson Marshmallow Sofa by TeamTeamUSA SciFi Control Room by PrettySmallThingNuke Lamp by Maxim Films TIMESQUARE watch body by mifgaFriday, April 26, 13
  4. 4. Lamp T3 by Emmett LalishWinterfell by damm301DiagridBracelet by Nervous System Maneval Bubble House Lamp by vinylFriday, April 26, 13
  5. 5. CAD & Animation ToolsFriday, April 26, 13
  6. 6. Polygonal:Box ModelingFace Modeling 1/3 “Blocking Topology” Sergi CaballerFriday, April 26, 13
  7. 7. Polygonal:Box ModelingFace Modeling 1/3 “Blocking Topology” Sergi CaballerFriday, April 26, 13
  8. 8. “Modeling A Female Head” by Jonathan Williamson (Blendercookie.com)Polygonal:Edge/Contour ModelingFriday, April 26, 13
  9. 9. “Modeling A Female Head” by Jonathan Williamson (Blendercookie.com)Polygonal:Edge/Contour ModelingFriday, April 26, 13
  10. 10. Digital Sculpting“Head Modeling in Sculptris” by 333taronFriday, April 26, 13
  11. 11. Digital Sculpting“Head Modeling in Sculptris” by 333taronFriday, April 26, 13
  12. 12. NURBSNon-uniform rational B-splineFriday, April 26, 13
  13. 13. Surfacing Continuity“Dreaded 3-Way Corner” by Adam O’Hern, cadjunkie.comFriday, April 26, 13
  14. 14. Surfacing Continuity“Dreaded 3-Way Corner” by Adam O’Hern, cadjunkie.comFriday, April 26, 13
  15. 15. Procedural ModelingCellular Form Generation Test 003c5 by andylomas99Friday, April 26, 13
  16. 16. Procedural ModelingCellular Form Generation Test 003c5 by andylomas99Friday, April 26, 13
  17. 17. 3D design apps for makers• solid• sculpting• parametric• polygonal (mesh)Friday, April 26, 13
  18. 18. solid modeling (free)Friday, April 26, 13
  19. 19. solid modeling (paid)Friday, April 26, 13
  20. 20. sculptingFriday, April 26, 13
  21. 21. Friday, April 26, 13
  22. 22. Friday, April 26, 13
  23. 23. parametricFriday, April 26, 13
  24. 24. polygonal (mesh)Friday, April 26, 13
  25. 25. STL Repair UtilitiesFriday, April 26, 13
  26. 26. Friday, April 26, 13
  27. 27. #1. Print often; learn something from every print.TextWatching your draft — or a part of your draft print — will tell you off the bat a lot about the health of yourdesign file. And if you are hoping what you produce will fit something in the real world, taking time early toknock a dirty imperfect draft out might save you a lot of effort later in the process of working the model: thequestion of toleranceFriday, April 26, 13
  28. 28. #2. Save not only your design file, but also copycurves, faces, and solids you use to buildgeometry and commit booleans for future fixes!Create a safe way to be messy, to take risks. You will want to try multiple approachesA history tool doesn’t necessary take the place of your layer full of reference items — those representideas you tried and you might want to return to that reference elsewhere in your model. This isparticularly helpful when you begin stacking boolean operations and other processes where it is easy tolose track of the steps you take as you switch into responding aesthetically to the results.Friday, April 26, 13
  29. 29. #3. Document the steps you takepreparing your models for printing.Even if tuning the slicing profile to get gorgeous prints isn’t really your favorite part of the process, makesure to record what steps you do take. The reason being, it is important to separate the decisions youmake designing your model form the settings for execute — or you will begin to deceive yourself as tohow healthy your model is or how reliable your machine profile.Friday, April 26, 13
  30. 30. #4. When selecting a software package,add the user community into consideration.As the more popular design packages continue to gain new tools and add-ons to bring in the excitingfunctionality from the other options available, the liveliness of the community plays a bigger and biggerrole in helping you solve decisions with your tool and generate the market for 3rd party plugins to extendyour capability. Engage in your community — ask questions, share findings, and share love — and youwill find that you are making connections for how to use your software and solve the endless unexpecteduse-cases crop up.Friday, April 26, 13
  31. 31. #5. Don’t start empty.It is a known thing that the empty 3D design is far scarier than any blank canvas you might have startedwith before. The advice I hear time and time again is to cheat — don’t start empty, start with tools thatyou find helpful. For many people, this will be at the very least a scale model for the print surface of yourtarget printer. But it is important to add enough constraint to reduce the feeling of being overwhelmed bythe tremendous abundance of design opportunities available to you.But there are other things to throw in there. Flat reference files grabbed from the web or a camera. Scanfiles for related objects, even if you won’t use them in your design. And a really helpful suggestion that Ihave started trying myself is to throw in both abstract noisy references (patterns, thresholded photos ofasphalt) and references from nature (dense foliage, underwater images, etc.). Where these becomehelpful is when you are looking to add a little asymmetry or introduce a curve or a posture. Instead oftrying to choose one, snatch one from your reference files and keep modeling — these tools help you getbeyond your first instincts so that you can respond to what is happening in your design document,instead of what you WANT to happen there.Friday, April 26, 13
  32. 32. Matthew GriffinWriter, Design and Modeling for 3D Printing O’Reilly/MAKE (Sept 2013)Director of Community, Support, & Evangelism,ADAFRUIT Industriesmattgriffin@tornticket.comFriday, April 26, 13

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