Beach Road, Porous Pavement and Then Some

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Beach Road, Porous Pavement and Then Some

  1. 1. Beach Road – Warren County, Lake George, NY NYS County Highway Superintendents Association 2013 Winter Conference & Trade Show January 23, 2013Integrating Green Infrastructure and Heavy Duty Porous Pavement ….and Then Some
  2. 2. …BackgroundMulti-lane, 1-mile long Collector RoadSouthern end of Lake GeorgeMulti-Modal
  3. 3. …BackgroundFunded for full-depth ReconstructionFederal, State and Local FundsImprovements in Drainage and Subbase, MobilityNo Environmental Objectives in Original Scope
  4. 4. …BackgroundRoadway drains directly to the lakeImpaired Water – Chlorides, Road PollutantsSilt & Sediment from Urban Runoff & Erosion
  5. 5. Constraints • Little to no opportunity to obtain ROW • Virtually flat roadway • Elevation 4’ above Lake Level • High Water Table • Curbed Section
  6. 6. …Proposed Maintain Existing X-Section
  7. 7. SedimentDelta Formation – English Brook – Lake George
  8. 8. ROADWAY POLLUTANTS Photo credit: Jeremy Walker, Science Photo Library
  9. 9. Pollutants and Sources of Highway RunoffPollutant SourceParticulates Pavement wear, vehicles, atmospheric deposition, maintenance activities.Nitrogen, Phosphorus Atmospheric deposition and fertilizer application.Lead Tire wear.Zinc Tire wear, motor oil, and grease.Iron Auto body rust, steel highway structures such as bridges and guardrails, and moving engine parts.Copper Metal plating, bearing and brush wear, moving engine parts, brake lining wear, fungicides and insecticides.Cadmium Tire wear and insecticide application.Chromium Metal plating, moving engine parts, and brake lining wear.Nickel Diesel fuel and gasoline, lubricating oil, metal plating, bushing wear, brake lining wear, and asphalt paving.Manganese Moving engine parts.Cyanide Anti-caking compounds used to keep deicing salts granular.Sodium, Calcium, Deicing salts.ChlorideSulphates Roadway beds, fuel, and deicing salts.Petroleum Spills, leaks, antifreeze and hydraulic fluids, and asphalt surface leachate.Trash/Litter Items discarded or fallen out of moving vehicles found alongside roadways (e.g., paper/plastic cups, food containers, etc.) Source: Stormwater Management Planning Guide for Transportation Projects, NYSDEC, 2005
  10. 10. Targeted Pollutants and Their SourcesAutomobile By-Products Chlorides – Salt
  11. 11. Targeted Pollutants and Their Sources SedimentAutomobile By-Products Chlorides - Salt
  12. 12. Three Segments of the Corridor Ponds – No Swales – No West End Sheet Flow - No Sand Filters – No Rain Gardens – No Green Roofs – No Stormwater Planters – No Infiltration – Yes Proprietary Structures – Yes NYSDEC East End
  13. 13. Porous Pavements• Parking areas, access roads, walkways, driveways, cul-de-sacs, urban and suburban roads, etc. Porous HMA Porous PCC
  14. 14. Porous Pavements• Parking areas, access roads, walkways, driveways, cul-de-sacs, urban and suburban roads, etc. Porous Pavers
  15. 15. If We Can …Where Can We Install Porous Pavement?
  16. 16. East EndSedimentFormedDelta Off-Site Sand and Salt NYSDEC Forest Preserve
  17. 17. East End Profile 12.75%5.75%
  18. 18. East EndSedimentFormedDelta Off-Site Sand and Salt SWTS NYSDEC Forest Preserve
  19. 19. Downstream Defender
  20. 20. Downstream Defender
  21. 21. Downstream Defender10 ft. Diameter Proprietary Structure – 25 CFS Capacity, 8.5 CY Sediment Storage – NYSDEC – Says Need 80% TSS Removal & NJDEP Approval – However,…NJDEP Tests at 50% TSS Removal Approved DD => 7 CFS…….(10’ Unit) (8’ unit = 4.4 CFS) – No NJDEP Tests at 80% – WQv Treatment (0.22 ac-ft) for contributing Area = WQv Flow Rate of 4.0 CFS --->…At 7.0 CFS we have 50% TSS Removal, Then at 4.0 CFS we must have more Manufacturers Spec’s claim 95% TSS Removal @ 4.0 CFS. Test Results from NJDEP Testing rated the DD at 70% Removal Efficiency using the following Equation where Q=gpm, D= feet. Q=502 (D/4) ^2.5 = 11 CFS at 70% TSS RemovalNYSDOT Specifications – ITEM 604.5102nn15 (Serialized by Max Flow Rate) • 80% TSS Removal for WQv Storm • Pass the Design Year Storm = 10 Year, 24-hour => 13.7 CFS (100 yr = 19.6 CFS) • Use 10’ Diameter Unit = 25 CFS Capacity, Sediment Storage • Manufacturers Specs – 50% TSS Removal at 25 CFS 80% TSS Removal Rate at 15 CFS
  22. 22. Stormwater Treatment Structures West End NYSDEC East End
  23. 23. West Brook
  24. 24. SedimentWest Brook Formed Delta
  25. 25. Stream Day-lighting & Sediment Removal Existing Culvert 225’ Feet Long
  26. 26. West BrookProposed Culverts2 x 70’ Feet Long
  27. 27. Low Flow (90%) Channel High Flow Channel
  28. 28. West Brook
  29. 29. West BrookLooking West January 14, 2013
  30. 30. West End - Porous Pavement West End NYSDEC East End
  31. 31. Porous Asphalt Pavement “The Year of Porous Asphalt: Salem, Oregon Proves Trend -- Water-absorbing Pavement is Vogue in 2012” LANHAM, Md., Oct. 15, 2012 /PRNewswire- USNewswire “Water Absorbing Porous Asphalt Pavement Use Increases in 2012” – Too many to list “Pavement That Actually Drinks Water? “ | YNN “It was all absorbed into the pavement “
  32. 32. Porous Asphalt Pavement• Groundwater recharge augmentation• Runoff Reduction• Effective pollutant treatment for solids, metals, nutrients, and hydrocarbons• Safety Improvements – Glare, Road Spray• Reduced Hydroplaning – Friction when wet• Reduced de-icing Materials – Reduced Black Ice• Less Susceptible to Frost – No Capillary Action• Noise Reduction• Little to No Closed Drainage System Needed
  33. 33. Porous Asphalt Pavement• Typically Parking areas, Low Volume, Low Speed Roads, Driveways Similar to Open Graded Asphalt Courses used by NYSDOT (10FX) - Porous Asphalt Pavement Not Successful US EPA However, It was not a Porous Asphalt SYSTEM
  34. 34. University of New Hampshire Model Pervious pavement: 4-6” (10 - 15 cm) of porous asphalt Choker Course: 4”-8” (10 – 20 cm) minimum thickness of ¾” crushed stone Filter Course: 8” - 12” (20 - 30 cm) minimum thickness of subbase (aka. bank run gravel or modified 304.1)Filter Blanket: intermediate setting bed: 3” (8 cm) thickness of 3/8” (1 cm) pea gravelReservoir Course: 4” (10 cm) minimum thickness of 3/4” (2 cm) crushed stone for frost protection, 4-6” (10-15 cm) diameter perforated subdrains with 2” cover Optional-Liner for land uses where infiltration is undesirable (e.g., hazardous materials handling, sole-source aquifer protection) Native materials
  35. 35. Research: Maine Pilot Project December 2010 – Porous Asphalt Feasibility Study – Warren County, Lake George Association (LGA), County Soil and Water Conservation• 4-lane arterial in South Portland• Installed in Fall of 2009 – ARRA Funded• 20,100 Design AADT, 5% Heavy Trucks (3.0 M ESALS• Highly developed retail and commercial corridor• No signs of rutting or deterioration In July, 2012• Custom mix designed for test section, NAPA, UNH• Warmer Temperatures than Lake George (5-100 F )
  36. 36. Porous Asphalt Pavements New Heavier Duty Applications Maine Mall Road (Portland, Maine) Photo Credit: Maine DOTMaine Mall Road (Portland, Maine) Photo Credit: Maine DOT
  37. 37. Maine Mall Road – Portland Maine 850’ feet Long 60,000 SF of Porous Asphalt
  38. 38. The Maine DOT Section9” Asphalt, 15” Reservoir Course, Variable Sand Layer 60,000 SF of Porous Asphalt Photo Credit: Maine DOT
  39. 39. Beach Road Design Considerations• Infiltration Tests – 3”/ hr and up• Design Traffic Loading 1.05 M ESALS - 8600 AADT, 5% Trucks• Heavy Duty Pavement System• Sand Layer – (in UNH and Maine design) May Not Be Feasible• Frost Penetration With high Water Table and Lake• Constructability Requirements – Economic Impact to Area• Targeted Primary Pollutants• Lake Backflow – Irene and Lee• Contamination from offsite – Irene and Lee• Extreme Storm Planning – Irene and Lee• Redundant Drainage System – FHWA Funded, GIGP Grant• Parts of Existing Drainage System permanently underwater
  40. 40. Consensus Building• WORK CLOSELY WITH Owner and Agencies• Warren County and Warren County Board of Town Supervisors – Lake George Association, Warren County Soil and Water Conservation District, NYSDEC, – EFC – GIGP, EPA - $415,000 from GIGP Grant• FHWA involved at the onset – Experimental status, Requested testing and monitoring – Should project not function as intended, repairs will be reimbursed (prorated) by FHWA during time frame of 8 yrs.• NYSDOT (Region 1 & Main Office) involved at the onset – Work w/B&L to develop testing and monitoring protocols• KEY PLAYERS AND STAKEHOLDERS Involved EARLY ON
  41. 41. Design Criteria• AADT – 8,600 • Roadway Grade < 5%• 5% Trucks • Minimize Traffic Control• 30 MPH Speed Limit Devices and abrupt Speed• DHV = 800 Changes
  42. 42. Beach Road System
  43. 43. Beach Road Section
  44. 44. Beach Road System Safeguards• Frost Penetration Requirements (FAA Design) Thicker Section• Minimize contamination from offsite• Accelerated Ground Stabilization – Sod, High Performance Blankets• No intermediate Sand Layer• Flanking Drainage Structures – Irene and Lee• Regular Vacuuming• Education – Public and Municipal• Upgrade or Improve Other Nearby Systems – West Brook
  45. 45. Beach Road System Safeguards
  46. 46. Beach Road System Safeguards
  47. 47. Beach Road System Safeguards
  48. 48. Beach Road System Safeguards
  49. 49. Beach Road System Safeguards
  50. 50. Beach Road System Safeguards No Sand Layer
  51. 51. Beach Road System Safeguards VACUUM
  52. 52. Beach Road System Safeguards VACUUM
  53. 53. Beach Road System Safeguards Power Wash
  54. 54. Beach Road System Safeguards Power Wash
  55. 55. Beach Road System Safeguards Clogging Layer Lost Storage Capacity
  56. 56. Beach Road System Safeguards Power Wash
  57. 57. Beach Road System Safeguards Slower Infiltration Maintain Adequate Storage Capacity
  58. 58. Beach Road System Safeguards Offsite Contamination Protection Flanking Structures
  59. 59. Beach Road System Safeguards 72” Existing Pipe Flanking Structures Stormwater Treatment System
  60. 60. Specifications
  61. 61. Typical Top Course -100% Can pass the½” SieveTypical Top Course - 2.36 mm16% Can pass the #8Sieve
  62. 62. Beach Road Testing Protocol
  63. 63. Beach Road Testing ProtocolOxidation of the BinderHydraulic Scouring/StrippingImproperly Stored orOverheated Binder
  64. 64. No ChokerCourse Choker Course
  65. 65. Beach Road Testing Protocol
  66. 66. Beach Road Testing Protocol
  67. 67. Demonstration
  68. 68. Beach Road Testing Protocol
  69. 69. Sample Cores
  70. 70. BASE COURSEBASE or Binder Course
  71. 71. TOP CourseTop COURSE
  72. 72. Demonstration
  73. 73. Demonstration
  74. 74. Demonstration
  75. 75. Water Quality• Redevelopment Project with reduction in impervious – From 94% impervious to 50% impervious – WQv treatment and Water Quantity not actually required Since Greater than 25% reduction in Impervious• Installing 3 Proprietary SWTS to treat runoff• Biological activity within the asphalt layers – 98% “Oil bio-degradation in permeable pavements by microbial Communities” , A.P. Newman, C.J. Pratt, S.J. Coupe and N. Cresswell
  76. 76. Water Quality• Reduced Chlorides by Using Less UNHSC concludes that de-icing materials can be reduced by approximately 50%• Metal Removal - Zinc, Lead, Copper, Cadmium• Suspended Solids - Typically Sand, Metals Attached• Digestion of Hydrocarbons by Aerobic Bacteria Oil bio-degradation in permeable pavements by microbial Communities” , A.P. Newman, C.J. Pratt, S.J. Coupe and N. Cresswell Franklin Institute
  77. 77. PDH Questions• Of the following Roadway Grades, which would be considered acceptable for Porous Pavement Applications? – 10% – 2% – 0% – 0.5%
  78. 78. PDH Questions• A Porous Asphalt roadway system Should NOT be described as: – A Green Infrastructure practice – An Infiltration Practice – An Absorbent Roadway – Part of a Recharge System – All of the Above
  79. 79. PDH Questions• A Porous Asphalt roadway system may not be advisable when: – It is Adjacent to a “Brownfield” or contaminated soil site – Operating Speeds are over 45 mph – Proposed for use at a fueling station – Installed along an Ocean Frontage Road – All of the Above
  80. 80. PDH Questions• True or False – Quality Control throughout the project construction is of Paramount Importance?
  81. 81. PDH Questions• At what ambient air temperature range is it recommended to place and finish Porous Asphalt? – 75 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit – 30 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit – 867 5309 degrees Kelvin – 98.6 degrees Celsius – 50 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit
  82. 82. PDH Questions• Applying a Choker Course Can help you accomplish which of the following: – Get Arrested – Win the WWF Wrestling Championship – Keep your dog from biting your neighbor – Stabilize the larger stone course or courses
  83. 83. Maintenance • Design Offsite Protection Systems into your project • Maintain Vegetated Areas • Vacuum 2 - 3 X / Year • Slope Vegetated Areas Away from Roadway • Use Sod to Establish Turf • Education – Public and Municipal • Deep Clean Promptly if Accident Occurs Expect Continued Improvements in Maintenance Options and Equipment
  84. 84. Maintenance
  85. 85. Why is the Beach Road Project Significant ?Higher Traffic and Traffic Loading ApplicationsStandardized Specifications – NYSDOTStandardizes Protocols and Quality ControlOpens up the Practice to Thousands of miles ofRoadways & where HD Pavement is NeededHigh Water Table Application Next to a Lake
  86. 86. Thomas Baird, PE, CPESC Barton & Loguidice 10 Airline Drive Suite 200 Albany, NY 12205 (518) 218-1801tbaird@bartonandloguidice.com

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