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Integrating Gender in the M&E of Health Programs: A Toolkit

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Presented during a December 2017 webinar

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Integrating Gender in the M&E of Health Programs: A Toolkit

  1. 1. Integrating Gender in the M&E of Health Programs: A Toolkit Brittany S. Iskarpatyoti, MPH Bridgit Adamou, MPH Jessica Fehringer, PhD MEASURE Evaluation December 12, 2017
  2. 2. Overview Toolkit Development Background & Purpose
  3. 3. Background & Purpose
  4. 4. Gender: Culturally defined set of economic, social, and politicalroles, responsibilities, rights, entitlements, obligations,and power relations associated with being female and male, and the relationships between and among women and men Gender expectations have a significant impact on a person’s health, shaping: • Behaviors and exposure • Beliefs related to risk and vulnerability • Help/health-seeking • How health services are structured and provided Gender, Health, and M&E
  5. 5. Gender integration entails identifying and addressing gender differences and resulting inequalities Gender integration in M&E includes: • Collection and use of • Sex- and age- disaggregated data • Gender-sensitive data • Analyze whether programs are changing gender norms; reducing inequalities; and improving service delivery, access to services and health outcomes Gender, Health, and M&E
  6. 6. Principles, Policies & Frameworks
  7. 7. Purpose This toolkit provides: •Processes and tools for integrating gender in a health program’s M&E activities •Guidance on facilitating communication with primary stakeholders on the importance of gender and M&E •Additional resources on gender-integrated programming and M&E
  8. 8. Development
  9. 9. Methods Women, Girls,and Gender Equality(WGGE) Framework Source: Michal Avni, Joan Kraft, Diana Santillan, Ana Djapovic Scholl, Amani Selim, & the M&E Technical Working Group. (2013). Results framework for the WGGE principle. Washington, DC, USA: Global Health Initiative’s Women, Girls, and Gender Equality Principle M&E Technical Working Group.
  10. 10. •Reviewed existing tools on gender and M&E •Developed outline in consultation with GHI WGGE M&E Working Group representatives •Developed content •Feedback from GHI WGGE M&E working Group, other USAID staff, including LGBT experts, and other MEASURE Evaluation experts in gender and M&E and data use •Sought USG offices with which to pilot the tool Methods Development
  11. 11. • Key population HIV project • Capacity building Pilot Ghana Care Continuum Project Evaluate for Health (E4H) • M&E project • Training of trainers
  12. 12. Toolkit
  13. 13. Designed for • Program individuals and teams • Program directors • Gender focal persons • Program officers • M&E officers • Various health programs • Various health agencies and initiatives Audience
  14. 14. Facilitation • Team or single facilitator • Responsible for organizing the process: collecting documents, setting up meetings, and enabling discussion and learning • How to Use this Toolkit Time varies depending on M&E situation and modules planning to complete.
  15. 15. Toolkit Modules MODULE Potential Use MODULE A: Developing a Rationale for Integrating Gender into M&E Begin the process of integrating gender into M&E MODULE B: Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders Choose your stakeholders and/or assign tasks MODULE C: Setting the Stage for Gender Integration into M&E Provide guidance on what to cover in an initial stakeholder meeting on gender integration into M&E MODULE D: Building a Gender- Integrated M&E Plan Identify and develop gender-integrated elements of your M&E plan and create a gender-integrated results framework MODULE E: Developing an Implementation, Dissemination and Use Plan Determine methods for data collection, analysis, dissemination, and interpretation
  16. 16. Toolkit Module Components
  17. 17. Toolkit Activities MODULE Gender-Related M&E Activities MODULE A: Developing a Rationale for Integrating Gender into M&E Activity A.1: Gathering background information Activity A.2: Organizing background information MODULE B: Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders Activity B.1: Identifying stakeholders Activity B.2: Engaging stakeholders MODULE C: Setting the Stage for Gender Integration into M&E Activity C.1: Reviewing gender-integrated programming Activity C.2: Introducing fundamentals of M&E Activity C.3: Introducing gender-integrated M&E Activity C.4: Presenting the country’s gender, gender-related programming, and M&E situation MODULE D: Building a Gender- Integrated M&E Plan Activity D.1: Adapting program goals and objectives and reviewing the scope of the M&E system Activity D.2: Building your gender-integrated M&E results framework Activity D.3: Defining indicators to measure gender-related outputs and outcomes Activity D.4: Creating your gender indicators to measure gender-related outputs and outcomes Activity D.5: Identifying data sources MODULE E: Developing an Implementation, Dissemination and Use Plan Activity E.1: Determining methods for data collection Activity E.2: Developing a plan for analyzing, disseminating and using your data
  18. 18. Toolkit
  19. 19. Activities are supported by relevant tools: • Spreadsheets are designed to help you organize program and M&E information. Toolkit Tools
  20. 20. Toolkit Tools
  21. 21. Activities are supported by relevant tools: • Spreadsheets are designed to help you organize program and M&E information. • Sample agendas are provided to guide in-person meetings. Toolkit Tools
  22. 22. Toolkit Tools
  23. 23. Activities are supported by relevant tools: • Spreadsheets are designed to help you organize program and M&E information. • Sample agendas are provided to guide in-person meetings. • PowerPoint (PPT) presentations are designed to guide your discussions, ensuring that essential points on each topic are covered. Speaker notes are included with the PPTs. Toolkit Tools
  24. 24. Toolkit Tools
  25. 25. Activities are supported by relevant tools: • Spreadsheets are designed to help you organize program and M&E information. • Sample agendas are provided to guide in-person meetings. • PowerPoint (PPT) presentations are designed to guide your discussions, ensuring that essential points on each topic are covered. Speaker notes are included with the PPTs. • Handouts highlightimportant informationfor each activity. They may be distributed to your stakeholders or other interested parties that the team involves inthe process as reference or to work through an activity. Toolkit Tools
  26. 26. Toolkit Tools
  27. 27. By working through the activities and companion tools, programs will have: • An understanding of the relationship between gender, programs, and M&E • A working gender-integrated M&E plan/framework • A implementation, dissemination, and use plan for gender data Toolkit
  28. 28. Available Now! www.measureevaluation.org/ resources/tools/gender/toolkit -for-integrating-gender-in-the- monitoring-and-evaluation-of- health-programs
  29. 29. Questions/Feedback If you have already reviewed the tool and have feedback – we would love to hear it so that we can make improvements. bschriver@unc.edu
  30. 30. Acknowledgments • MEASURE Evaluation Project and the MEASURE Evaluation Population & Reproductive Health Project (2009–2014) • Bridgit Adamou • Shelah Bloom • Jessica Fehringer • Brittany Iskarpatyoti • Jessica Levy • Tara Nutley • Knowledge Management Team • USAID • Michal Avni • Joan Marie Kraft • Vy Lam • Ana Djapovic Scholl • Annie Schwartz • Amani Selim • Women, Girls, and Gender Equality (WGGE) Technical Working Group & Global Health Initiative • Evaluate for Health • Care Continuum Project
  31. 31. This presentation was produced with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under the terms of MEASURE Evaluation cooperative agreement AID-OAA-L-14-00004. MEASURE Evaluation is implemented by the Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partnership with ICF International; John Snow, Inc.; Management Sciences for Health; Palladium; and Tulane University. Views expressed are not necessarily those of USAID or the United States government. www.measureevaluation.org

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