June                                                                                              1Smart Grids and the New...
Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................
         COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES ENABLING THE SMART GRID ..................................... 27              SMART...
VIII. SMART GRID CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES........................................... 47              INTEROPERABILITY...
XI. CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS................................................................... 62          o      M2...
        “We need a new industrial revolution.”     •        Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy.                         ...
 Select Questions Answered In “Smart Grid & the New Utility” 1. What does the ‘Smart Grid’ mean and how is it defined to d...
 Executive Summary   The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) allotted $11 Billion for upgrading the U.S. e...
Where does the ‘Smart Grid’ rest among company priorities? What are the key drivers, technologies, obstacles and trends im...
Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Xcel, have begun to pave a path for other...
    Carrier Services. Will utilities ultimately emerge as a new breed of carrier after embracing IP     technologies, wir...
taking advantage of alternative energy sources are able to ‘run their meter forward’.      Growing awareness of this, coup...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Smart Grid & The New Utility

1,125 views

Published on

Market brochure produced for Maravedis on Smart Grid strategies. Includes carrier / utility wireless initiatives for smart grid deployments.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,125
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
66
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Smart Grid & The New Utility

  1. 1. June 1Smart Grids and the New Utility A Maravedis Study in Conjunction with the University of Maryland University College Authors:Eric Ashie Leanne McAfeeJoseph Feilinger Joseph MaceiraDavid Gleason Paul ObiLucas Kimanzi Heather SamuelAdvisor:Mead Alexander Eblan    410 rue des Recollets, Suite 301, Montreal, Quebec H2Y 1W2, 
  2. 2. Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................... 7    OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY ................................................................................................... 7    BACKGROUND ...................................................................................................................... 7    SELECT FINDINGS ................................................................................................................ 9 II. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................. 12 III. WHAT’S DRIVING THE SMART GRID......................................................................... 15    GOVERNMENT POLICIES..................................................................................................... 15    Agency Research Projects – Energy (ARPA-E) ............................................................ 15    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) ............................................... 15    American Clean Energy and Security (ACES) Act of 2009 .......................................... 15    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) ......................................... 16    GROWING ENERGY DEMAND ............................................................................................. 19    ENERGY INDEPENDENCE AND SECURITY............................................................................ 19    REDUCING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT ................................................................................. 20    ECONOMIC GROWTH .......................................................................................................... 20    TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT ..................................................................................... 21    GRID EFFICIENCY............................................................................................................... 21    CONSUMER EMPOWERMENT .............................................................................................. 21    GRID DEPENDABILITY........................................................................................................ 22 IV. GETTING INSIDE THE GRID .......................................................................................... 23    NO SMART METER, NO SMART GRID ................................................................................. 23    OPERATING COMPONENTS ................................................................................................. 24    SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES............................................................................................. 25 2 Copyright Maravedis © Inc 2010 – All Rights Reserved
  3. 3.   COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES ENABLING THE SMART GRID ..................................... 27    SMART GRID COMMUNICATIONS ....................................................................................... 29    A NEED FOR NEW STANDARDS .......................................................................................... 31    BRAINS BEHIND THE GRID.................................................................................................. 31    PRIVACY & SECURITY IMPLICATIONS ................................................................................ 33 V. BEYOND THE GRID............................................................................................................ 34    APPLICATION AND THE SECURITY IMPLICATIONS .............................................................. 34    STANDARDIZING STANDARDS ............................................................................................ 35    TRANSITION WITHOUT DISRUPTION ................................................................................... 35    SMART GRID AND THE CONSUMER .................................................................................... 36    UTILITIES LEADING THE CHARGE ...................................................................................... 37  A SNAPSHOT OF SMART GRID ACTIVITIES .............................................................................. 38    Austin Energy ................................................................................................................ 38    Duke Energy.................................................................................................................. 39    Dominion....................................................................................................................... 39    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) ................................................................ 40    San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E) ........................................................ 40    Xcel Energy ................................................................................................................... 41 VII. FROM HOMEFRONT TO CITYSCAPE ........................................................................ 42    RATE PLANS ...................................................................................................................... 42    ASSOCIATION OF HOME APPLIANCE MANUFACTURERS (AHAM) ..................................... 44    SMART APPLIANCES AND INNOVATIONS ............................................................................ 45    PROGRESSIVE CITIES.......................................................................................................... 45    Austin, Texas ................................................................................................................. 45    Boulder, Colorado ........................................................................................................ 46 3 Copyright Maravedis © Inc 2010 – All Rights Reserved
  4. 4. VIII. SMART GRID CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES........................................... 47    INTEROPERABILITY STANDARDS ........................................................................................ 47    FUTURE PROOFING UTILITY SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE ...................................................... 47    RE-DEFINING UTILITIES BUSINESS MODELS AND INCENTIVES ........................................... 48 IX. THE NEW BUSINESS OF UTILITIES ............................................................................. 49    OPEN PLATFORM ............................................................................................................... 49    OPEN SOURCE .................................................................................................................... 50    REAL-TIME ENERGY DATA ................................................................................................ 50 X. THE GRID AS A COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK ..................................................... 52    APPLICATION AND SOLUTIONS DEVELOPMENT .................................................................. 52    HOW ARE CARRIERS REACTING? ........................................................................................ 54    AT&T............................................................................................................................. 54    Verizon Wireless ........................................................................................................... 55    Sprint ............................................................................................................................. 56    WIMAX AND THE SMART GRID ........................................................................................ 57    COMMUNICATIONS VENDORS GIRDING THE GRID ............................................................. 59    Airspan .......................................................................................................................... 59    Alcatel-Lucent ............................................................................................................... 59    Alvarion......................................................................................................................... 59    Cisco ............................................................................................................................. 59    Motorola ....................................................................................................................... 59    OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ........................................................................................... 60 4 Copyright Maravedis © Inc 2010 – All Rights Reserved
  5. 5. XI. CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS................................................................... 62  o  M2M Transaction & Billing processing ....................................................................... 62  o  Monitoring facilities, outages ....................................................................................... 62  o  Work order management inventory .............................................................................. 62  o  Customer information relay .......................................................................................... 62  o  Transmitting data/information sharing ........................................................................ 62  o  Communications platforms ........................................................................................... 62  o  Data aggregation backhaul .......................................................................................... 62  o  Customer connectivity ................................................................................................... 62  o  Meter connectivity ......................................................................................................... 62  o  Back-up / redundant connectivity ................................................................................. 62    ROLE OF THE AMERICAN RECOVERY & REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009 .............................. 63    RECOMMENDATION: CONSUMER EDUCATION ................................................................... 65    RECOMMENDATION: STANDARDIZATION HARMONIZATION ............................................... 65    RECOMMENDATION: BUILD ON SUCCESS, LEARN FROM FAILURE ...................................... 65 XII. REFERENCES .................................................................................................................... 67  5 Copyright Maravedis © Inc 2010 – All Rights Reserved
  6. 6.      “We need a new industrial revolution.”  •  Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy.           Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  7. 7.  Select Questions Answered In “Smart Grid & the New Utility” 1. What does the ‘Smart Grid’ mean and how is it defined to different stakeholders? 2. Why is a ‘Smart Grid’ important, and what are its key drivers, trends, opportunities and  obstacles? 3. What government policies, agencies, and regulations are helping drive Smart Grid efforts? 4. What AARA funding programs are available? 5. Who are the key operatives behind Grid policy today? 6. What makes the grid ‘smart’?  Maravedis peels back all the components, from AMI to ADO,  ADM and AAM. 7. What technologies are important for deploying Smart Grid infrastructure and solutions? 8. Where do communication technologies and wireless come into play? 9. Which utilities are most progressive in their Smart Grid strategies, and why? 10. What do Smart Grid solutions look like, today and tomorrow?   11. Who are the key players leading the charge in grid intelligence? 12. How are communication and wireless carriers engaging the Smart Grid marketplace, and  what value can they bring, notably in 4G, WiMAX, and LTE developments? 13. How will electricity pricing look in the wake of smart metering, and to what extent can  utilities learn from mobile communication operators? 14. What are the privacy and security implications, and how are they being addressed? 15. Can the Grid ever become the new communications network, cutting a swath between the  Cable versus Telco duopoly feeding Internet, TV and telephony to today’s households?    Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  8. 8.  Executive Summary   The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) allotted $11 Billion for upgrading the U.S. electrical infrastructure ‐ and the first down payment of $3.4B was announced in October 2009 to equip electrical systems with smart meters and sensors.      This study analyzes how new advances in digital, wireless and information technology can spear‐head improved services and efficiencies in the electrical grid, and provides an analysis of key drivers, leading players, emerging applications, new devices, and the role of the regulatory arena.  A key focus will be how telecommunications carriers and wireless technologies can both benefit from and help enable Smart Grid initiatives ‐ with a particular spotlight on the implications for Electric Utilities and their consumers.         Background  We are collectively encumbered by an electrical grid based on century‐old technology and a 50‐year old infrastructure.   Over the past couple of years, Maravedis has witnessed an increasing number of its customers peeking under the utility hood to get better involved in emerging Smart Grid initiatives.  Hence, we’ve joined up with graduate students at the University of Maryland University College to canvas the Smart Grid landscape, talk to industry leaders and essentially study “Smart Grids and the New Utility” to get a clear understanding of what ‘Smart Grid’ means to its growing community of interested parties – particularly carriers and telecom vendors.      Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  9. 9. Where does the ‘Smart Grid’ rest among company priorities? What are the key drivers, technologies, obstacles and trends impacting its deployment?  Where does wireless and WiMAX have a play – and who are the utilities, telecommunication operators, solutions providers, and vendors leading the charge?    Moreover, how is the ‘consumer sphere’ reacting and what can they expect regarding new features, functionalities, services, and pricing models as intelligence gets baked into the Grid from generation to transmission, and distribution to the home?  What we’re finding is electricity is indeed seeking a ‘new normal’ – a Smart Grid that will transform electricity as a commodity and fully realize the Grid’s real capacity as a modern infrastructure.  Vendors that can provide solutions for real‐time monitoring, data aggregation and consumer feedback get to the front of the line, because the New Grid will reward conservation versus consumption.  Today’s electrical power grid currently provides 99.7 percent reliability. Unfortunately, the remaining 0.03% of the time outages occur costs the economy an estimated $150 billion per year, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. This fact, along with the need to meet growing energy demands, mitigate carbon emissions, achieve energy independence, accommodate renewable energy sources, and shift consumer behavior towards conservation, have all contributed to a sense of urgency for building intelligence into electricity grids everywhere. In the U.S, the federal government has kicked this effort into gear starting with the introduction the Energy Independence Act of 2007 (EISA), the American Clean Energy and Security (ACES) Act of 2009, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) stimulus.  It’s important to note, though, that California’s Assembly Bill 32 (AB‐32) more formally known as the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions  included the introduction of residential Smart Meters in the 73 different line‐items of its scoping plan.  And thirty years prior to AB‐32, Amory Lovin’s seminal 1976 article on “Energy Strategy: The Road Not Taken” had explored the need to upgrade our electrical system to increase energy efficiencies.    The Smart Grid changes the electrical industry’s entire business model, and introduces a decentralized model with greater consumer‐utility interaction. It brings the philosophies, concepts, and technologies that made the Internet possible to the electric grid, providing a new platform enabling two‐way digital communication and plug‐and‐play capabilities.  Cities across the nation will undoubtedly endure the brunt of the changes; however two in particular, Austin, Texas and Boulder, Colorado, have taken a lead in the implementation of Smart Grids. Additionally, with truly innovative techniques and key initiatives to ensure adherence to government regulations, utilities such as Austin Energy, Duke Energy, Dominion,    Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  10. 10. Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Xcel, have begun to pave a path for other utilities to follow with regard to Smart Grid installations.   This transformation will not occur in a one simple upgrade, but instead a total revamp with 21st century infrastructure, to include metering and communications technologies. It is a promise of a new way of reliably delivering the energy at the lowest possible cost and more efficiently. Fostering the grid is not only one of industrys largest opportunities, but it will be the most important turning page in the history of household energy since the U.S. Civil War forced a switch from whale oil to coal in lighting the night sky 150 years ago.   Select Findings    A major ingredient of any Smart Grid effort is efficient communications between the various stakeholders involved in the generation and delivery of electric power – power plants, power marketers, transmission systems, local power companies, and ultimately the end‐user.  Open standards and interoperability ‐ rather than proprietary technologies ‐ will be crucial to effective, widespread use of the Smart Grid, and better enable the Grid to integrate new and innovative devices and energy applications we simply can’t imagine today.  What Maravedis has learned from interviewing network equipment manufacturers, utilities companies, wireless vendors and carriers?  Standards. New levels of standards protocols need to be agreed on, from device to  network, and especially across utilities (IOU, Muni and Coops, all who are regulated  differently) – driving the need for ‘utility‐agnostic’ devices  New Modes of Management. While most of the Smart Grid focus is on micro‐energy  management within the household, the onslaught of Plug‐in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV)  will require new macro‐energy levels of management   Spectrum. Use of licensed spectrum is preferred over unlicensed, placing WiMAX at an  advantage for wireless smart meter communication and the backhauling of aggregated  usage data   M2M.  Wireless carriers see Smart Grid initiatives helping drive machine‐to‐machine (M2M)  services.  Like the Kindle and the iPAD, smart meters offer new opportunities in monetizing  3G wireless services      Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  11. 11.   Carrier Services. Will utilities ultimately emerge as a new breed of carrier after embracing IP  technologies, wireless access and intelligent 2‐way devices?  The consensus is ‘no’ – but we  uncovered some interesting examples of electricity coops rolling out triple play services that  include Internet access, television and wireless solutions.  Government. The government’s role is paramount in moving Smart Grid initiatives forward,  due to the enormous costs, complexity, standards, and regulation needed. The $3.4 billion  in stimulus funds announced in October 2009 targets adding 1.8 million smart meters and  200,000 advanced transformers across the U.S. Challenges The universe of interested stake‐holders circling the Grid makes for an eclectic array of seemingly non‐related challenges.  Key challenges discussed in the report include:  Interoperability Standards:  New devices coupled with new applications and an upgrade to  two‐way, IP‐enabled metering opens a Pandora’s box of issues regarding communication,  encryption, security, privacy and the transmission of usage‐related data. Will an open‐ platform and open source applications render our Grid less secure?  Infrastructure:  How to future‐proof the next‐generation of utility systems architecture,  when you’re tethered to the Net and deploying meters that operate only in certain  spectrum, using wireless technologies that may be surpassed at speeds utilities have yet to  experience?  Will we need to change our electricity meters at the same rate as we replace  our mobile phones someday?  The most revealing thing about ‘infrastructure’ is human –  the U.S. has a dearth of capable IT and engineering talent.  Smart Meter acceptance:  The major challenge for utilities will be how to best position  smart meter deployments in the marketplace.   New Business Models: Energy rates will need to change to encourage conservation, and  one of the capabilities smart metering provides is the ability to ‘time‐shift’ electricity usage  to take advantage of non‐peak hours. Maravedis clearly expects electricity bills to go down  – yet energy rates to rise.  Marginalizing the Grid:  Smart meters are an extension of net‐meters.  While not all net‐ meters are ‘smart’, all smart‐meters will have net‐metering capabilities – wherein homes    Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   
  12. 12. taking advantage of alternative energy sources are able to ‘run their meter forward’.   Growing awareness of this, coupled with newer, less expensive options for ‘going off the  grid’ (e.g. Nanosolar panels, Bloom boxes, backyard windmills), will create pockets of utopia  where any upgrading of the Grid at the distribution point is simply not as significant.   Indeed, despite all the chatter about ‘smart meters’ being phase one of a more intelligent  grid, the real challenge is not at the household ‐ but along the transmission lines. So much  power is lost in transit that investment is more urgently needed for infrastructure efficiency  than for replacing household meters.  Communication Technologies.  Smart Grid initiatives are lighting the fire under carrier  machine‐to‐machine (M2M) sales, yet the jury is still out on which wireless technology will  reign supreme.  Moreover, most smart meter roll‐outs have been in secondary markets  involving small clusters of trial users.  Meanwhile, broadband‐over‐power line (BPL) claws  back out of the grave, mesh networks battle it out with WiMAX, and LTE lurks in the future.   The Grid will need to embrace open‐standards and a homogenized communications  infrastructure for it to truly be ‘smart’, but the marketplace remains a cacophony of  competing communication technologies.  Consumers. A Smarter Grid will turn the utility business model inside‐out, but will smart  meters create smarter consumers?  Do consumers really care to micro‐manage their  electricity usage?  There is a populist back‐lash against smart metering trumpeted by  notions of higher rates, horribly‐managed roll‐outs, ideas of big brother hovering, and who  will own (and get to utilize) the volumes of near real‐time usage data.  Smart metering is  only the start to the Smart Grid transformation, and if its value isn’t properly communicated  then household, township, state‐wide and nationwide economies will end up being the  largest challenge to Smart Grid initiatives.  Research Methodology Maravedis teamed up with graduate students in the Telecommunications Management program (TLMN) at the University of Maryland University College for two capstone studies on Smart Grids and their impact on Utilities and communications Carriers/Vendors.  Student research included surveying and interviewing a number of key players in the equipment vendor, electrical utility, state and federal regulatory, and telecommunication carrier space.    Copyright © Maravedis Inc. 2010   

×